"
Newspaper Archive of
Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
Lyft
December 22, 1955     Walsh County Press
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December 22, 1955
 

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DECEMBER 22, 1955 WALSH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA PAGE THREE boy was born Dec, 15 to Mr.] Born: Dec. 13, a boy to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Vorachek, Lank|n, I Mrs. Jerry Leedahl, Hoople. W00lf3 0000dio. As Christmas bills ring aMd angels sing -- The joyous song of our sincere w|shes for all, is l resounding chorus that echoes "Good Health... Good Cheer ond Much Happiness at Yuletide." Ad 34, Fore ]7 Samson Electric ... We're popping up now to say "Thank You"... and to extend to you our best wishes for a wonderful, CHRISTMAS! v Wiliie's Mobit Service Grandpa 00,oved 7"rees, Children By John Bttrnham. Fargo, N D. Grandpa loved trees. He also lov- ed children and the amily-together glow of Christmas. Once a year those feelings got in each other's way and Grandpa was distressed by his conflict of emotions and loves. Grandpa was a Yankee, trans- planted from the woods of New England to the woods of northern Wisconsin. He coul swing through a section of pine and tell you how many feet of timber it would scale He was all man. handling a team in the dangerous job of snaking logs to the runway or taking his turn with the chopping ax or at the end of a crosscut saw. He loved the trees he worked with and they seemed to sense it, as a cow or dog or horse senses the undertanding of a man who works with them Grandpa could plant any kind of tree at any time of year-- and almost anywhere---and that tree would grow and flourish Our own efforts have been barely rewarded fl though we always chose the best of conditions to move a tree About two weeks before Christ- mas Grandpa would say, "Dan, it's time to go down to the swamp and get a tree Take the young folks along, to get them out from under foot." Grandpa, first testing its blade against his finger, would take his chopping ax and head for the woods, us younsters following. Now came the strain, the conflict of emotion. For to grandpa no tree should be cut unless it was ill-shaped and wouldn't make a saw log, or if it were crowding other treesin too limited a space, or if it were a ripe forest giant which had reached full growth and was ready to be felled for timber. Grandpa's idea of a Cristmas tree was a five or six foot spruce, well rounded and perfectly propor- tioned the kind of a perfect young- ster of a tree which it broke grand- pa's heart to cut. Now, at this gay time, we are pleased to greet those whose friendship we prize: Our best wishes to you! Huitstrand Studio May happiness, peace and conenmamt be in sto00 for all of mankind. May your :holiday be rich with the Spirit A that makes Christmas new w00do00u, -::2- - ....... _::::::: - _. : .......................... Hardy's Standard Garage As we went beyond the lane to the woods, then across the strip of hay marsh to the spruce swamp, grandpa would scan the small clumps of evergreens. Quickly he'd spy a tree such as Grandpa wanted a tree set a bit apart, so its growth had been even. He'd walk all around the little tree, put out a hand to touch its waxy greenness. Then he'd walk on. There would be half an hour or an hour of this. Invariably, how- ever, his choice would narrow to a tree not quite perfect, one crowd- ed into the clump so that both its value and its future were doubtful. With the ax handle he would tuna- ble the snow off its palmated limbs. Then he'd trim the dead twigs near the base. Finally, after a practice swing to be sure he had room clear of surrounding brush, grandpa would cut that tree at the base in one smooth, even cut. It looked easy the way he did it. We made quite a procession going back, grandpa with the tree on his back because dragging it would have distrubed the full flare of the branches. At the house the old gentleman would shoo us away, then carefully put the tree in the "summer kitchen," leaning with its bad side to the wall; for certain- ly Grandma, drying her hands on her apron, would step out to size up this year's tree. Grandpa, out in the shop, would ri up a wooden base then stand the tree straight while nailing or wiring,, the final anzle braces to the trunk. He would place the tree in- side the house; then. careful to get that stunted side next to the wall, where Grandma could not see. That way the tree--three-fourths well branched and those three-fourths facing into the roomwas as good as any tree could be. In that way grandpa solved his cross currents of love and loyalty. He hadn't cut a perfect tree. a tree which should be left to grow to timber size. yet he had furnished a tree which--when carefully placed runt side to the wall--was a perfect tree for Christmas. Name Von Rueden Polio Drive Aide The appointment of Kenneth Von Rueden of Park River as county chairman of the "Teens Against Polio" department of the March of Dimes campaign in Waish county, was announced this week by Tom Kelly, of Park River, cottnty cam- paign director. Drive Runs Through 3anuary The March of Dimes drive runs throughout the month of January. Kelly says township and city chair- men are being named and arrange- ments are being made for a banquet in Park River Dec. 29 to kick off the drive in the county. The "Teens Against Polio" por- tion of the drive Will consist main- ly of a "blue crutch" day on which teenagers in towns around the area will sell miniature blue crutches. Kelly and Dr. Earl Infetd of Graf- ton. county chapter chairman at- tended a district ]arch of dimes meeting at Grand Forks Friday. z OLDSMOBILE SEE YOUR NEAREST OLDSMOBILE DEALER Malde & Sharpe Hardware DECEMBER 22, 1955 WALSH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA PAGE THREE boy was born Dec, 15 to Mr.] Born: Dec. 13, a boy to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Vorachek, Lank|n, I Mrs. Jerry Leedahl, Hoople. W00lf3 0000dio. As Christmas bills ring aMd angels sing -- The joyous song of our sincere w|shes for all, is l resounding chorus that echoes "Good Health... Good Cheer ond Much Happiness at Yuletide." Ad 34, Fore ]7 Samson Electric ... We're popping up now to say "Thank You"... and to extend to you our best wishes for a wonderful, CHRISTMAS! v Wiliie's Mobit Service Grandpa 00,oved 7"rees, Children By John Bttrnham. Fargo, N D. Grandpa loved trees. He also lov- ed children and the amily-together glow of Christmas. Once a year those feelings got in each other's way and Grandpa was distressed by his conflict of emotions and loves. Grandpa was a Yankee, trans- planted from the woods of New England to the woods of northern Wisconsin. He coul swing through a section of pine and tell you how many feet of timber it would scale He was all man. handling a team in the dangerous job of snaking logs to the runway or taking his turn with the chopping ax or at the end of a crosscut saw. He loved the trees he worked with and they seemed to sense it, as a cow or dog or horse senses the undertanding of a man who works with them Grandpa could plant any kind of tree at any time of year-- and almost anywhere---and that tree would grow and flourish Our own efforts have been barely rewarded fl though we always chose the best of conditions to move a tree About two weeks before Christ- mas Grandpa would say, "Dan, it's time to go down to the swamp and get a tree Take the young folks along, to get them out from under foot." Grandpa, first testing its blade against his finger, would take his chopping ax and head for the woods, us younsters following. Now came the strain, the conflict of emotion. For to grandpa no tree should be cut unless it was ill-shaped and wouldn't make a saw log, or if it were crowding other treesin too limited a space, or if it were a ripe forest giant which had reached full growth and was ready to be felled for timber. Grandpa's idea of a Cristmas tree was a five or six foot spruce, well rounded and perfectly propor- tioned the kind of a perfect young- ster of a tree which it broke grand- pa's heart to cut. Now, at this gay time, we are pleased to greet those whose friendship we prize: Our best wishes to you! Huitstrand Studio May happiness, peace and conenmamt be in sto00 for all of mankind. May your :holiday be rich with the Spirit A that makes Christmas new w00do00u, -::2- - ....... _::::::: - _. : .......................... Hardy's Standard Garage As we went beyond the lane to the woods, then across the strip of hay marsh to the spruce swamp, grandpa would scan the small clumps of evergreens. Quickly he'd spy a tree such as Grandpa wanted a tree set a bit apart, so its growth had been even. He'd walk all around the little tree, put out a hand to touch its waxy greenness. Then he'd walk on. There would be half an hour or an hour of this. Invariably, how- ever, his choice would narrow to a tree not quite perfect, one crowd- ed into the clump so that both its value and its future were doubtful. With the ax handle he would tuna- ble the snow off its palmated limbs. Then he'd trim the dead twigs near the base. Finally, after a practice swing to be sure he had room clear of surrounding brush, grandpa would cut that tree at the base in one smooth, even cut. It looked easy the way he did it. We made quite a procession going back, grandpa with the tree on his back because dragging it would have distrubed the full flare of the branches. At the house the old gentleman would shoo us away, then carefully put the tree in the "summer kitchen," leaning with its bad side to the wall; for certain- ly Grandma, drying her hands on her apron, would step out to size up this year's tree. Grandpa, out in the shop, would ri up a wooden base then stand the tree straight while nailing or wiring,, the final anzle braces to the trunk. He would place the tree in- side the house; then. careful to get that stunted side next to the wall, where Grandma could not see. That way the tree--three-fourths well branched and those three-fourths facing into the roomwas as good as any tree could be. In that way grandpa solved his cross currents of love and loyalty. He hadn't cut a perfect tree. a tree which should be left to grow to timber size. yet he had furnished a tree which--when carefully placed runt side to the wall--was a perfect tree for Christmas. Name Von Rueden Polio Drive Aide The appointment of Kenneth Von Rueden of Park River as county chairman of the "Teens Against Polio" department of the March of Dimes campaign in Waish county, was announced this week by Tom Kelly, of Park River, cottnty cam- paign director. Drive Runs Through 3anuary The March of Dimes drive runs throughout the month of January. Kelly says township and city chair- men are being named and arrange- ments are being made for a banquet in Park River Dec. 29 to kick off the drive in the county. The "Teens Against Polio" por- tion of the drive Will consist main- ly of a "blue crutch" day on which teenagers in towns around the area will sell miniature blue crutches. Kelly and Dr. Earl Infetd of Graf- ton. county chapter chairman at- tended a district ]arch of dimes meeting at Grand Forks Friday. z OLDSMOBILE SEE YOUR NEAREST OLDSMOBILE DEALER Malde & Sharpe Hardware