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Park River , North Dakota
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November 19, 2014     Walsh County Press
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Pa00e 4 FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK... BY ALLISON OLIMB EDITOR, WALSN COUNTY PRESS The Aggies took this football sidelines or from the other side of season one game at a time and the live-streaming game or from came out victorious. We all behind the radio play-by-play while whooped and hollered from the angling the antenna for a clear sig- PRESS PERSPECTIVES THE/ALSH COUNTY PRESS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 20 / nll. The score doesnt tell the true but you also earned the respect of a tet of character, though, lot of people who have been watch- [We saw you make that tackle, ing you. but we also saw you help your op- ponent back onto his feet. We saw you make that touch- down, but we also saw that you did- n't carry on like some NFL stars are know to do. We saw you be good teammates and good students. That is why we cheer for you. You earned the points on the board Hello, We have a neighbor who is a teamster. Now, he is not like a De- mocrat Teamster. He is a teamster that drives horses. He gives our grandkids rides with a nice dun team of quarter cross horses. And this year he even mowed the ditch- es with a five foot horse drawn mower! And that got me to thining about Clyde. Clyde was a huge Percheron cross that Linseth owned. He was blacker than the inside of a cow and stood about seventeen hands tall. Maybe a little better. I couldn't stand the sight of him just standing in the pen. I had to drive him. You know, like a painter who can't stand looking at a blank canvas. Trouble was, I knew very little about breaking a team. If you haven't already figured that out. I had Lee, our neighbor come down to help me. We called Lee for lots of help over the years. I had been driving Clyde and another pretty much unbroken horse around the corral. Being the fixer upper that I am, I had put a pole on an old wag- on and figured I had a pretty good outfit put together. Lawrence was a construction worker that was staying at our place at the time. He was part of a road crew working in the area. And an old family friend. He had just Hat Tips come home from work and had cleaned up to head into Joe's Bar. Joe had a sign that advertised "Free Beer Tomorrow" hung behind the bar. Lawrence had seen the sign the day before and didn't realize that the same sign would be there that night. Anyway, Lee helped me adjust the harness. Kelly mounted up on Zip and was going to snub the team up to prevent any runaway. Lawrence stood under the shade of a tree with a beer in his hand, go- ing to watch this deal before he headed for town. Clyde, the Percheron, was a little antsy. He was throwing his head and pranc- ing around. The other horse didn't seem to pay him much never mind. We got that team hooked up to the wagon and I told Lee to jump on. Lee just looked at me and grunted. "I never trusted a prancer", he said as he declined the maiden voyage of my outfit. The first few steps seemed to go alright. And then that wagon box started to rattle a little. Clyde start- ( ;(x xl Happenings at Our Samaritan Good Samaritan ! a Rs'r.a Nannette Hoeger, Activities Dir. ed to throw a fit and the wagon rat- tled a little more. The off horse got excited and started to lunge in the harness. Zip, our snubbing horse, blew up and started to buck with Kelly. Kelly pitched the rope in the air and had his hands full. Like usu- al, I was on my own. Clyde and his partner ignored my screams and headed out of the yard. I was bounding around that wagon like a bb in a box and try- ing to pull on the lines. Things were happening pretty fast and I was pulling on the right line with all my mite. We made a circle in front of the house, tore through the garden and scarred an oak tree with a tire swing on it. By then, I had lost all control, and was pretty much just pulling for my own exercise. We ran by Lawrence and caused him to throw his beer in the air and run for the house. The horses were in full stride when we struck the side of Lawrence's pickup. And this one wasn't a glancing blow. The pole A BIG THANK YOU to Mayor Dan Stenvold of Park River and Marquita Novak. The Veterans Pro- gram was a HUGE HIT!!!! The Vet- erans were very pleased that you thought of them in such a wonder- ful way. They know first hand that Freedom is not Free. We would love to have people come in to visit us, if you have a talent you would like to come share, please call me at 701- 284-7115. This Week of Nov. 16th-22nd Nov. 16th 2:30 Worship w/Father Luiten, 3:30 N2L Nov.17th 10am Embroidery Group, l pm Making Fudge, 5pm Rosary, 6:45 Men's Night Nov. 18th lpm Thanks Tree, 3pm Wine and Cheese Party Nov. 19th 3pm Bingo Nov. 20th 3pm Thanks for Giv- ing Luncheon, 6:30 Movie Night Nov. 21 st 3:30 Beading Nov. 22nd 9:30 Mass w/Father Luiten, lpm N2L, 2:15 Bingo Next Week Nov. 23rd- 29th Nov. 23rd 2:30 Worship w/Pas- tor Marchant, lpm Peeling Potatoes Nov. 24th 10am Embroidery Group, lpm Making Lefse, 4pm Hymn Sing, 5pm Rosary, 6:45 Bin- go Nov.25th 3:30 Bible Study Nov. 26th 11:15 Resident Coun- cil, lpm Baking Pies, 3pm Bingo Nov. 27th Happy Thanksgiving Nov. 28th 10:30 Nail Time, Christmas Decorating Nov. 29th 9:30 Mass w/Father Luiten, lpm Christmas Craft, 2:15 Bingo Thank you to our many volun- teers: Father Luiten, Shirley Sobo- lik, Linda Larson, Dorothy Novak, Pastor Hinrichs, Terry Hagen, Corinne Ramsey, and anyone I for- got I am sorry. NDSU Agriculture Communication s,,,,,. ! Publtc00 Walsh County Health District I P ..... " ....... Short Shots | ...... i frrri fl r IIFi ................ What is strep throat? "Strep" is short for streptococ- cal, which can cause a variety of diseases such as strep throat and skin infections such as impetigo. This same organism sometimes causes more severe illness such as kidney infections, scarlet fever, heart valve infections, deep skin and muscle infections and rheu- matic fever. Who is at risk for strep throat? Anyone can be at risk for strep throat, although it typically occurs in children between the ages of 6 and 12. Strep throat occurs most often during the late fall, winter and early spring. For the most part, humans are the only source of the bacteria. What are the symptoms of strep throat? People with strep throat may have few or no symptoms. Gener- ally they will have sudden onset of fever, sore throat and tender and enlarged tonsils. Symptoms usu- ally occur one to three days after being infected. How is strep throat spread? Strep throat is spread through large respiratory droplets (cough- ing, sneezing) or direct contact with people who are ill. It is rarely spread by touching surfaces or ob- jects. How is a person diagnosed? Usually, a rapid strep test is done by swabbing the throat. Other tests include growing the bacteria in cultures. What is the treatment? Penicillin or other antibiotics are used to treat strep throat. Make sure to follow all directions when taking antibiotics to reduce the chance of relapse and developing antibiotic resistant strains. Does past infection make a person immune? Repeated infections of strep throat are common. Should children or others be excluded from day care, school, work or other activities if they have strep throat? Recommendations from the health department include: People with strop throat should stay home until they have been on appropriate antibiotics for 24 hours. During an outbreak, people with sore throats should stay home until strep has been ruled out. What can be done to prevent the spread of streptococcal? If diagnosed with strep, persons should take the appropriate antibi- otics and remain at home for 24 hours. Wash hands often with soap and water or use a hand sanitizer. Always use appropriate respiratory etiquette and don't share food or drinks. Congratulations on a great sea- son, Park River/Fordville-Lankin football. We are proud to say that we were there when the Aggies won the title. We can't wait to see what next year brings. Like" the Walsh County Press on Face- book.com. struck the drivers side door right in the center. I can now tell you from experience that a when a team hits the side of a four-wheel drive pick- up, the team will stop. Much like my mule driving deal, I flew through the air and land- ed atop the team. My patched up harness was pretty much demol- ished. My wagon was wrecked. We had broken a wheel on the oak tree. Lawrence's pickup had a couple thousand dollars damage. He had spilled his beer. Kelly had ridden Zip to a standstill. I crawled off the top of the team and walked shakily over to Lee, who was still standing by the cake house steps. The whole deal had taken about ten seconds. Lee lit up a Pall Mall, shook his head, and said, "I never trusted a prancer". That reminds me of what the auctioneer said at the horse sale. This ranch had a pretty dam nice horse in the ring. But the horse was a little plain looking and not bring- ing the dollars he deserved. Lynn was begging for bids and com- mented, "He's a little plain, but dancing girls don't make the best cooks!" I mentioned to Shirley that they don't need to and she hit me! Later, Dean U. S. Constitution Requires Lower Expectations nificant changes in public policy. They did adopt the Affordable Care Act that terrorized and in- flamed Republicans. Even though Republicans now control both houses of Congress, their ef- forts to repeal the program will be stalled because the President has a veto. This big cumbersome govern- mental system minimizes the ef- fectiveness of any one person, even the President. However, In order to win candidates must ex- aggerate their ability to get the country moving. By themselves, they can't. But that doesn't impair their campaigns. In order to get voters to take them seriously in a system of government that doesn't, can- didates pledge on Bibles that they will single-handedly change the direction of the country. You can take that to the bank. If you do, you will be charged with scam- ming. In 2008, the President won by promising any number of pro- grams that could not overcome the status quo system. In 2014, Republicans boldly promised to repeal Obamacare but they can't. Despite all of the pontificating, the voters are not fooled. They sense that it is a status quo system and the results of a single election will not shake the world. So they don't vote. In fact, 60 percent of the voters stayed home in No- vember. For the past six years, the sta- tus quo system has been a com- fort to Republicans. It has kept the Democrats at bay. With the Senate now in the hands of the Republicans, the Democrats are comforted because the Republi- cans are the ones stuck the status quo system.. The difficulty of getting action out of this status quo system is now compounded by uncompro- mising interest groups buying both parties. America was prac- tically ungovernable before. With interest groups, it has become more ungovernable than ever. So expect little over the next two years. Even that may be too optimistic. Despite the convincing Re- publican victories in the 2014 off-presidential year election, they will do little to change the Washington gridlock detested by tlhe electorate. At least, that's what the U. S. Constitution says. - Haunted by the abuses of King George III, the Constitution drafters feared any concentration of power so they designed a sys- tem of government that would prevent hasty action. To prevent abuses, the Found- ing Fathers divided governmen- tal powers into three branches and went so far as to divide the legislative branch into two houses. Not only does the struc- tural design prevent change but the fact that each branch has a different constituency creates a major barrier. One third of the Senate is elected every two years, with the rest of the senators representing past elections; the whole House is elected biennially. But then the president has a 4-year term that overlaps two-thirds of the Senate and the entire House. These staggered elections mean that electoral mandates sel- dom exist. To accomplish any- thing, one party has to muster support in both houses and the presidency. So even though Re- publicans just won a convincing election, they still must contend with a carryover president and two-thirds of the Senate. All of this brings governmen- tal scholars to label the American political system as status quo. Translated into practice, that sim- ply means that nothing much happens regardless of strong surges at the polls. The purpose of this point is to warn everyone about expecta- tions based on the results the 2014 election. Nothing is going to happen, just as George Wash- ington, James Madison and those other folks planned. Some religious Republicans may thank God that they escaped the silver bullet when President Barack Obama and the Democ- rats controlled the presidency and Congress and frittered away their opportunity without making sig- These staggered elections mean that electoral mandates seldom ex- ist00 14 Extension Exchange Now's the Time to Shop Small Since 2010, the Saturday after Thanksgiving has been designated "Small Business Saturday." It is a day to recognize small businesses and what they bring to a local com- munity. "You probably know the direct impact of the small businesses in your community," says Glenn Muske, the North Dakota State University Extension Service's ru- ral and agribusiness enterprise de- velopment specialist. 'qhey provide the goods and services I need. My goal is to shop small whenever I Can." "My reason is, I know the peo- ple and I find that they take care of me because we have that local con- nection," he adds. Yet providing goods and servic- es is just the beginning of what small businesses offer. Many of them provide employment. They also generate sales tax revenue that helps support local needs such as roads, parks and emergency services. Research also has found that these small-business owners give back to the community in terms of charitable donations. In addition, some provide people to work at charitable events. Also, check how many posters you see in their win- dows or on their display boards that advertise such events. For some of the bigger events, their entire front window encourages community spirit. In addition to dollars and other re- sources, the small-business owners give their time. Often, you find these small-business owners as lo- cal leaders, elected officials, and par- ticipants in civic and other organi- zations. If the town has a volunteer ambulance or fire service, they probably are involved.. The bottom line: They are crucial in developing and maintaining many of the aspects that form the 'quali- ty of life' in communities, be that community a small, rural town or an identifiable district within a large city. The owners just respond when asked. They keep things going. Across the U.S., more than 90 percent of businesses are small. The vast majority of those business have fewer than 20 employees. Many have fewer than 10 or even five employees. Yet they generate a substantial portion of our gross do- mestic product. Small businesses are not only sellers in the economic system, but they also are buyers and consumers of goods and services, thus adding more to their total contribution. They typically also are the point of departure for new ventures that may, one day, be a major corpora- tion. Small businesses are the lifeblood of a community. On Nov 29, stop in at your local small businesses. Make some purchases, but also say thanks for what they do for the com- munity and you as a consumer. For more information about the impact of small businesses or how to start one, contact your local Ex- tension Service office at 284-6624 or email Karl at kari.l.helgoe@ndsu.edu. Also vis- it NDSU's small-business support website at www.ag.ndsu.edu/small- business and sign up for the month- ly newsletter. Or check out Face- book at www.facebook.com/ND- SUextsmallbiz or Twitter at @grnuske. Other resources include http://powerofbusiness.net and www.eXtension.org/entrepreneur- ship. The Small Business Admin- isWation and its related organizations, such as the Small Business Devel- opment Centers and SCORE, also can be valuable resources. For more information, contact glenn.musu.edu or call (701) 328-9F16: You also can visit our website, www.. ag. ndsu. edu/smallbustness. Extension on Ag around the State niol00 F_.ffetfive Wodmlmp Set for Jan. (>8 A biologically effective pasture and harvested forage management workshop will be held Tuesday through Thursday, Jan. 6-8, 2015, at the North Dakota State University Dickinson Research Extension Cen- ter. Traditional beef production con- cepts consider beef weight as a source of income and forage as a major cost. Calf weight is the com- modity sold at market. However, the source of the weight sold is forage nutrients. "The original source of new wealth generated from livestock agriculture are the forage nutrients produced on land that has renewable natural resources," says Lee Manske, NDSU DREC research professor. "Greater calf weight gain is accumulated per acre when greater quantities of crude protein are cap- tured. However, capturing greater quantities of crude protein per acre requires biologically effective man- agement that actively renews the nat- ural resources of the land." Forage plant production requires the four major essential elements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen, plus the minor essential el- ements of seven macrominerals and 10 microminerals. These es- sential elements are transformed be- tween organic forms and inorganic (mineral) forms by the ecosystem bieochemical cycles performed by soil microorganisms. Most of the land used for live- stock agriculture in the northem Plains only has about 50 percent of the soil organism biomass that is needed for potential herbage pro- duction and calf weight gain per acre. "We have discovered how to increase the soil organism biomass above the minimum needed," Manske says. "During the work- shop, bee(producers will be shown how to manage land resources with biologically effective strategies that increase soil organism biomass, herbage production and calf weight gains per acre, resulting in the cap- ture of greater wealth per acre." The workshop will be held in the Red Office Building on the comer of State Avenue and Empire Road in Dickinson. The workshop will run from 1 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Wednesday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday. Dickinson is in the Mountain time zone. The workshop instructors are Manske and Toby Stroh, Dickinson State University assistant professor and AreGIS instructor. The workshop will provide the knowledge for understanding the symbiotic parmership among peren- nial grass plants, soil organisms and grazing animals. Each workshop participant will learn how to devel- op and properly operate a biologi- cally effective management strate- using twine-over rotataon graz- ing on summer pastures in con- junction with a complete 12-month complementary pasture and har- vested forage sequence specific for his or her ranch. To design 12-month forage man- agement strategies specific to indi- vidual ranches during the workshop, ArcGIS maps with each pasture and field for the entire land holdings, in- cluding owned and leased land, need to be made, and acreage of each soil type in each parcel of land needs to be calculated prior to the start of the workshop. Location de- scriptions of land holdings will need to be provided one month pri- or to the workshop to give special- ists sufficient time to develop maps. For workshop information or to register, call Manske at (701) 456- 1118 or email llewellyn.manske @ndsu.edu. 9 Editor s Note The Around the County columnn was not available this week. It will return as soon as possible. Pa00e 4 FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK... BY ALLISON OLIMB EDITOR, WALSN COUNTY PRESS The Aggies took this football sidelines or from the other side of season one game at a time and the live-streaming game or from came out victorious. We all behind the radio play-by-play while whooped and hollered from the angling the antenna for a clear sig- PRESS PERSPECTIVES THE/ALSH COUNTY PRESS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 20 / nll. The score doesnt tell the true but you also earned the respect of a tet of character, though, lot of people who have been watch- [We saw you make that tackle, ing you. but we also saw you help your op- ponent back onto his feet. We saw you make that touch- down, but we also saw that you did- n't carry on like some NFL stars are know to do. We saw you be good teammates and good students. That is why we cheer for you. You earned the points on the board Hello, We have a neighbor who is a teamster. Now, he is not like a De- mocrat Teamster. He is a teamster that drives horses. He gives our grandkids rides with a nice dun team of quarter cross horses. And this year he even mowed the ditch- es with a five foot horse drawn mower! And that got me to thining about Clyde. Clyde was a huge Percheron cross that Linseth owned. He was blacker than the inside of a cow and stood about seventeen hands tall. Maybe a little better. I couldn't stand the sight of him just standing in the pen. I had to drive him. You know, like a painter who can't stand looking at a blank canvas. Trouble was, I knew very little about breaking a team. If you haven't already figured that out. I had Lee, our neighbor come down to help me. We called Lee for lots of help over the years. I had been driving Clyde and another pretty much unbroken horse around the corral. Being the fixer upper that I am, I had put a pole on an old wag- on and figured I had a pretty good outfit put together. Lawrence was a construction worker that was staying at our place at the time. He was part of a road crew working in the area. And an old family friend. He had just Hat Tips come home from work and had cleaned up to head into Joe's Bar. Joe had a sign that advertised "Free Beer Tomorrow" hung behind the bar. Lawrence had seen the sign the day before and didn't realize that the same sign would be there that night. Anyway, Lee helped me adjust the harness. Kelly mounted up on Zip and was going to snub the team up to prevent any runaway. Lawrence stood under the shade of a tree with a beer in his hand, go- ing to watch this deal before he headed for town. Clyde, the Percheron, was a little antsy. He was throwing his head and pranc- ing around. The other horse didn't seem to pay him much never mind. We got that team hooked up to the wagon and I told Lee to jump on. Lee just looked at me and grunted. "I never trusted a prancer", he said as he declined the maiden voyage of my outfit. The first few steps seemed to go alright. And then that wagon box started to rattle a little. Clyde start- ( ;(x xl Happenings at Our Samaritan Good Samaritan ! a Rs'r.a Nannette Hoeger, Activities Dir. ed to throw a fit and the wagon rat- tled a little more. The off horse got excited and started to lunge in the harness. Zip, our snubbing horse, blew up and started to buck with Kelly. Kelly pitched the rope in the air and had his hands full. Like usu- al, I was on my own. Clyde and his partner ignored my screams and headed out of the yard. I was bounding around that wagon like a bb in a box and try- ing to pull on the lines. Things were happening pretty fast and I was pulling on the right line with all my mite. We made a circle in front of the house, tore through the garden and scarred an oak tree with a tire swing on it. By then, I had lost all control, and was pretty much just pulling for my own exercise. We ran by Lawrence and caused him to throw his beer in the air and run for the house. The horses were in full stride when we struck the side of Lawrence's pickup. And this one wasn't a glancing blow. The pole A BIG THANK YOU to Mayor Dan Stenvold of Park River and Marquita Novak. The Veterans Pro- gram was a HUGE HIT!!!! The Vet- erans were very pleased that you thought of them in such a wonder- ful way. They know first hand that Freedom is not Free. We would love to have people come in to visit us, if you have a talent you would like to come share, please call me at 701- 284-7115. This Week of Nov. 16th-22nd Nov. 16th 2:30 Worship w/Father Luiten, 3:30 N2L Nov.17th 10am Embroidery Group, l pm Making Fudge, 5pm Rosary, 6:45 Men's Night Nov. 18th lpm Thanks Tree, 3pm Wine and Cheese Party Nov. 19th 3pm Bingo Nov. 20th 3pm Thanks for Giv- ing Luncheon, 6:30 Movie Night Nov. 21 st 3:30 Beading Nov. 22nd 9:30 Mass w/Father Luiten, lpm N2L, 2:15 Bingo Next Week Nov. 23rd- 29th Nov. 23rd 2:30 Worship w/Pas- tor Marchant, lpm Peeling Potatoes Nov. 24th 10am Embroidery Group, lpm Making Lefse, 4pm Hymn Sing, 5pm Rosary, 6:45 Bin- go Nov.25th 3:30 Bible Study Nov. 26th 11:15 Resident Coun- cil, lpm Baking Pies, 3pm Bingo Nov. 27th Happy Thanksgiving Nov. 28th 10:30 Nail Time, Christmas Decorating Nov. 29th 9:30 Mass w/Father Luiten, lpm Christmas Craft, 2:15 Bingo Thank you to our many volun- teers: Father Luiten, Shirley Sobo- lik, Linda Larson, Dorothy Novak, Pastor Hinrichs, Terry Hagen, Corinne Ramsey, and anyone I for- got I am sorry. NDSU Agriculture Communication s,,,,,. ! Publtc00 Walsh County Health District I P ..... " ....... Short Shots | ...... i frrri fl r IIFi ................ What is strep throat? "Strep" is short for streptococ- cal, which can cause a variety of diseases such as strep throat and skin infections such as impetigo. This same organism sometimes causes more severe illness such as kidney infections, scarlet fever, heart valve infections, deep skin and muscle infections and rheu- matic fever. Who is at risk for strep throat? Anyone can be at risk for strep throat, although it typically occurs in children between the ages of 6 and 12. Strep throat occurs most often during the late fall, winter and early spring. For the most part, humans are the only source of the bacteria. What are the symptoms of strep throat? People with strep throat may have few or no symptoms. Gener- ally they will have sudden onset of fever, sore throat and tender and enlarged tonsils. Symptoms usu- ally occur one to three days after being infected. How is strep throat spread? Strep throat is spread through large respiratory droplets (cough- ing, sneezing) or direct contact with people who are ill. It is rarely spread by touching surfaces or ob- jects. How is a person diagnosed? Usually, a rapid strep test is done by swabbing the throat. Other tests include growing the bacteria in cultures. What is the treatment? Penicillin or other antibiotics are used to treat strep throat. Make sure to follow all directions when taking antibiotics to reduce the chance of relapse and developing antibiotic resistant strains. Does past infection make a person immune? Repeated infections of strep throat are common. Should children or others be excluded from day care, school, work or other activities if they have strep throat? Recommendations from the health department include: People with strop throat should stay home until they have been on appropriate antibiotics for 24 hours. During an outbreak, people with sore throats should stay home until strep has been ruled out. What can be done to prevent the spread of streptococcal? If diagnosed with strep, persons should take the appropriate antibi- otics and remain at home for 24 hours. Wash hands often with soap and water or use a hand sanitizer. Always use appropriate respiratory etiquette and don't share food or drinks. Congratulations on a great sea- son, Park River/Fordville-Lankin football. We are proud to say that we were there when the Aggies won the title. We can't wait to see what next year brings. Like" the Walsh County Press on Face- book.com. struck the drivers side door right in the center. I can now tell you from experience that a when a team hits the side of a four-wheel drive pick- up, the team will stop. Much like my mule driving deal, I flew through the air and land- ed atop the team. My patched up harness was pretty much demol- ished. My wagon was wrecked. We had broken a wheel on the oak tree. Lawrence's pickup had a couple thousand dollars damage. He had spilled his beer. Kelly had ridden Zip to a standstill. I crawled off the top of the team and walked shakily over to Lee, who was still standing by the cake house steps. The whole deal had taken about ten seconds. Lee lit up a Pall Mall, shook his head, and said, "I never trusted a prancer". That reminds me of what the auctioneer said at the horse sale. This ranch had a pretty dam nice horse in the ring. But the horse was a little plain looking and not bring- ing the dollars he deserved. Lynn was begging for bids and com- mented, "He's a little plain, but dancing girls don't make the best cooks!" I mentioned to Shirley that they don't need to and she hit me! Later, Dean U. S. Constitution Requires Lower Expectations nificant changes in public policy. They did adopt the Affordable Care Act that terrorized and in- flamed Republicans. Even though Republicans now control both houses of Congress, their ef- forts to repeal the program will be stalled because the President has a veto. This big cumbersome govern- mental system minimizes the ef- fectiveness of any one person, even the President. However, In order to win candidates must ex- aggerate their ability to get the country moving. By themselves, they can't. But that doesn't impair their campaigns. In order to get voters to take them seriously in a system of government that doesn't, can- didates pledge on Bibles that they will single-handedly change the direction of the country. You can take that to the bank. If you do, you will be charged with scam- ming. In 2008, the President won by promising any number of pro- grams that could not overcome the status quo system. In 2014, Republicans boldly promised to repeal Obamacare but they can't. Despite all of the pontificating, the voters are not fooled. They sense that it is a status quo system and the results of a single election will not shake the world. So they don't vote. In fact, 60 percent of the voters stayed home in No- vember. For the past six years, the sta- tus quo system has been a com- fort to Republicans. It has kept the Democrats at bay. With the Senate now in the hands of the Republicans, the Democrats are comforted because the Republi- cans are the ones stuck the status quo system.. The difficulty of getting action out of this status quo system is now compounded by uncompro- mising interest groups buying both parties. America was prac- tically ungovernable before. With interest groups, it has become more ungovernable than ever. So expect little over the next two years. Even that may be too optimistic. Despite the convincing Re- publican victories in the 2014 off-presidential year election, they will do little to change the Washington gridlock detested by tlhe electorate. At least, that's what the U. S. Constitution says. - Haunted by the abuses of King George III, the Constitution drafters feared any concentration of power so they designed a sys- tem of government that would prevent hasty action. To prevent abuses, the Found- ing Fathers divided governmen- tal powers into three branches and went so far as to divide the legislative branch into two houses. Not only does the struc- tural design prevent change but the fact that each branch has a different constituency creates a major barrier. One third of the Senate is elected every two years, with the rest of the senators representing past elections; the whole House is elected biennially. But then the president has a 4-year term that overlaps two-thirds of the Senate and the entire House. These staggered elections mean that electoral mandates sel- dom exist. To accomplish any- thing, one party has to muster support in both houses and the presidency. So even though Re- publicans just won a convincing election, they still must contend with a carryover president and two-thirds of the Senate. All of this brings governmen- tal scholars to label the American political system as status quo. Translated into practice, that sim- ply means that nothing much happens regardless of strong surges at the polls. The purpose of this point is to warn everyone about expecta- tions based on the results the 2014 election. Nothing is going to happen, just as George Wash- ington, James Madison and those other folks planned. Some religious Republicans may thank God that they escaped the silver bullet when President Barack Obama and the Democ- rats controlled the presidency and Congress and frittered away their opportunity without making sig- These staggered elections mean that electoral mandates seldom ex- ist00 14 Extension Exchange Now's the Time to Shop Small Since 2010, the Saturday after Thanksgiving has been designated "Small Business Saturday." It is a day to recognize small businesses and what they bring to a local com- munity. "You probably know the direct impact of the small businesses in your community," says Glenn Muske, the North Dakota State University Extension Service's ru- ral and agribusiness enterprise de- velopment specialist. 'qhey provide the goods and services I need. My goal is to shop small whenever I Can." "My reason is, I know the peo- ple and I find that they take care of me because we have that local con- nection," he adds. Yet providing goods and servic- es is just the beginning of what small businesses offer. Many of them provide employment. They also generate sales tax revenue that helps support local needs such as roads, parks and emergency services. Research also has found that these small-business owners give back to the community in terms of charitable donations. In addition, some provide people to work at charitable events. Also, check how many posters you see in their win- dows or on their display boards that advertise such events. For some of the bigger events, their entire front window encourages community spirit. In addition to dollars and other re- sources, the small-business owners give their time. Often, you find these small-business owners as lo- cal leaders, elected officials, and par- ticipants in civic and other organi- zations. If the town has a volunteer ambulance or fire service, they probably are involved.. The bottom line: They are crucial in developing and maintaining many of the aspects that form the 'quali- ty of life' in communities, be that community a small, rural town or an identifiable district within a large city. The owners just respond when asked. They keep things going. Across the U.S., more than 90 percent of businesses are small. The vast majority of those business have fewer than 20 employees. Many have fewer than 10 or even five employees. Yet they generate a substantial portion of our gross do- mestic product. Small businesses are not only sellers in the economic system, but they also are buyers and consumers of goods and services, thus adding more to their total contribution. They typically also are the point of departure for new ventures that may, one day, be a major corpora- tion. Small businesses are the lifeblood of a community. On Nov 29, stop in at your local small businesses. Make some purchases, but also say thanks for what they do for the com- munity and you as a consumer. For more information about the impact of small businesses or how to start one, contact your local Ex- tension Service office at 284-6624 or email Karl at kari.l.helgoe@ndsu.edu. Also vis- it NDSU's small-business support website at www.ag.ndsu.edu/small- business and sign up for the month- ly newsletter. Or check out Face- book at www.facebook.com/ND- SUextsmallbiz or Twitter at @grnuske. Other resources include http://powerofbusiness.net and www.eXtension.org/entrepreneur- ship. The Small Business Admin- isWation and its related organizations, such as the Small Business Devel- opment Centers and SCORE, also can be valuable resources. For more information, contact glenn.musu.edu or call (701) 328-9F16: You also can visit our website, www.. ag. ndsu. edu/smallbustness. Extension on Ag around the State niol00 F_.ffetfive Wodmlmp Set for Jan. (>8 A biologically effective pasture and harvested forage management workshop will be held Tuesday through Thursday, Jan. 6-8, 2015, at the North Dakota State University Dickinson Research Extension Cen- ter. Traditional beef production con- cepts consider beef weight as a source of income and forage as a major cost. Calf weight is the com- modity sold at market. However, the source of the weight sold is forage nutrients. "The original source of new wealth generated from livestock agriculture are the forage nutrients produced on land that has renewable natural resources," says Lee Manske, NDSU DREC research professor. "Greater calf weight gain is accumulated per acre when greater quantities of crude protein are cap- tured. However, capturing greater quantities of crude protein per acre requires biologically effective man- agement that actively renews the nat- ural resources of the land." Forage plant production requires the four major essential elements of carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen, plus the minor essential el- ements of seven macrominerals and 10 microminerals. These es- sential elements are transformed be- tween organic forms and inorganic (mineral) forms by the ecosystem bieochemical cycles performed by soil microorganisms. Most of the land used for live- stock agriculture in the northem Plains only has about 50 percent of the soil organism biomass that is needed for potential herbage pro- duction and calf weight gain per acre. "We have discovered how to increase the soil organism biomass above the minimum needed," Manske says. "During the work- shop, bee(producers will be shown how to manage land resources with biologically effective strategies that increase soil organism biomass, herbage production and calf weight gains per acre, resulting in the cap- ture of greater wealth per acre." The workshop will be held in the Red Office Building on the comer of State Avenue and Empire Road in Dickinson. The workshop will run from 1 to 9 p.m. on Tuesday, 8 a.m. to 9 p.m. on Wednesday and 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Thursday. Dickinson is in the Mountain time zone. The workshop instructors are Manske and Toby Stroh, Dickinson State University assistant professor and AreGIS instructor. The workshop will provide the knowledge for understanding the symbiotic parmership among peren- nial grass plants, soil organisms and grazing animals. Each workshop participant will learn how to devel- op and properly operate a biologi- cally effective management strate- using twine-over rotataon graz- ing on summer pastures in con- junction with a complete 12-month complementary pasture and har- vested forage sequence specific for his or her ranch. To design 12-month forage man- agement strategies specific to indi- vidual ranches during the workshop, ArcGIS maps with each pasture and field for the entire land holdings, in- cluding owned and leased land, need to be made, and acreage of each soil type in each parcel of land needs to be calculated prior to the start of the workshop. Location de- scriptions of land holdings will need to be provided one month pri- or to the workshop to give special- ists sufficient time to develop maps. For workshop information or to register, call Manske at (701) 456- 1118 or email llewellyn.manske @ndsu.edu. 9 Editor s Note The Around the County columnn was not available this week. It will return as soon as possible.