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Park River , North Dakota
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November 19, 2014     Walsh County Press
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THE WALSH COUNTY PRESS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2014 Pae 3 I Walsh County Spotlight The merchants below are X proud to announce: Thanksgiving Service, lPark River B00le Camp Area Thanksgiving Service will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 25, at 7 pm at the Park River Bible Camp, rural Park River, ND. Sponsored by the Western Walsh County Ministerium. Interested in becoming a spotlight sponsor? Contact the Press at 701-284-6333 COUNTY ESS Park River PO Box 49 284-6333 / y ('72 .,,Lnarltan I .... Park River l [ 301 County Road 12B 284'7115 [ Park River l Implement 284-6316 [ iR Park River ~ 284-7244 Adams ~ 944-2231 Grafton ~ 352-3668 T UNITED Michigan ~ 259-2112 --"Bank & Insurance Hoople ~ 894-6123 Crystal ~ 657-2168 110 4th St. E Park River 284-7221 Jim'! Super Yalu 284-6433 101 3rd St. W Park River For all your dinner needs! Electri "Where Quality is Standard" RmDENnAt & COMMErCiAL NEW WOV( OR REMOOEL EMERGENCY SERVICE AVAILABLE Call 70 t -33 I - 1579 Scott Wedel, Owner saelectric. 14@g mail.corn Veterans Ave. S,-Park River, ND III |31-2939 ;ment FOR THE TROOPS -Walsh County Veterans Service Office Re/x00says 60,000 0000eransget tr/p/e Nearly 60,000 veterans were triple dippers last year, drawing a total of $3.5 billion in military retirement pay plus veterans and Social Security disability benefits at the same time, congressional auditors report. It's all legal. The average payment was about $59,000, but about 2,300 veterans, or 4 percent of the total, received concurrent payments of $100,000 or more, the Government Accountability Office said. The highest payment was to a veteran who received $208,757 in com- bined payments in 2013. Some lawmakers say the report shows the need for better coordination among government programs that are facing severe financial con- straints. The Social Security Disability Insurance trust fund could run out of money in as soon as two years, government officials say. "We should fulfill our promises to the men and women who serve, but we need to streamline these duplicative programs," said Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., who requested the study. Veterans groups disagree. They say the retirement money was earned for years of service in the military, while disability payments are com- pensation for service-related injuries and wounds. In most cases, veterans who receive a combination of benefits are se- verely disabled. About 4 in 5 veterans who got triple payments had a dis- ability rating of at least 50 percent, the GAO said. Nearly half of those receiving triple payments were at least 60 years old. Louis Celli Jr., a Washington representative for the American Legion, said critics of the multiple benefits are "misguided and uninformed." He said the report "should simply be filed in the category of one of Sen. Cobum's parting shots to loyal upstanding American patriots who have sacrificed so much for this country." Cobum, a longtime critic of government spending, is retiring at the end of the year. He said in an interview that the report raises legitimate ques- tions about whether disability benefits are getting to those who truly need them. "This is billions of doUars a year in duplicative payments," Cobum said. "We ought to reassess and say, 'Are we doing more than take care of peo- pie in need?' I'm not against the military. I don't think they should be triple dipping.;" Most Americans would find it hard to understand how someone mak- ing $86,000 a year in tax-exempt VA income qualifies for Social Secu- rity Disability Insurance, when civilian workers are disqualified from the program if they make as little as $13,000 a year, Cobum said. Only ! 7 percent of those who received multiple forms ofcompensati0n had suffered a combat-related disability, according to the GAO. Veterans have long been exempted from rules that deny Social Secu- rity benefits to anyone with other income exceeding $13,000 a year. But until the Sept. 11,2001, terrorist attacks, veterans were barred from receiving both military retirement pay and Department of Veterans Af- fairs' disability benefits. Under a Civil War-era statute, the Pentagon docked retirement pay dollar-for-dollar up to the amount of disability benefits from the VA. With bipartisan support, Congress changed that law in 2002, gradual- ly restoring military retirement p to veterans also drawing disability ben- efits from the VA. "Our nation's status as the world's only superpower is largely due to the sacrifices our veterans made in the last century," Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., said in March 2002 when the bill was being debated. "Rather than honoring their commitment and bravery by fulfilling ow obligations, the federal government has chosen to perpetuate this lon- standing injustice," Reid said. "Quite simply, this is disgraceful and ve must correct it." ]. At the time, then-Sen. John Warner, R-Va., a former Navy secretary, posCxl a question to fellow senators: "How can we ask the men and women wtio have so faithfully served to sacrifice a portion of their retirement because they are also receiving compensation for an injury suffered while serv- ing their country?" Warner acknowledged that the change would have "significant cost," but added; "Is the cost too high? I think not." About 3 percent of the nation's 1.9 million military retirees collect all three benefits, the GAO said. The report did not recommend changes to the program. The VA said in a response that it "generally agrees" with the report's conclusions. Social Security officials did not comment. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact the Walsh County Veteran Service Office at 701-352-5030 or stop by for a visit at 638 Cooper Avenue Suite 5 Grafton, ND 58237. Chris Kratochvil * Walsh County Veterans Service Officer Administrative Building, 638 Cooper Ave Ste 5, Grafton By Jim Miller Dear Savvy Senior, Can Medicare help me quit smoking? I just turned 65, and wouM like to quit but need some help. Coughing Connie Dear Connie, Yes, Medicare actually covers up to eight face-to-face counseling sessions a year to help beneficiaries quit smoking. And, if you have a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan, certain smoking-cessation medications are covered too. Here are some other tips that can help you kick the habit. Never Too Late Of the 46 million Americans who smoke, about 5.5 million are Medicare beneficiaries. According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 50 percent of smokers, age 65 and older, indi- cate they would like to completely quit, but because of the nicotine, which is considered to be more ad- dictive than heroin, it's very difficult to do. Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable illness, responsible Savvy Cont. page 5 Jim Goodrich named Honorary Letterwinner at University of Iowa CAVALIER, N.D. -- In recog- nition of his outstanding service and dedication to the University of Iowa Athletics Department, Jim Goodrich has been selected as an Honorary Letterwinner. Jim has been the Director of Athletics inAc- tion in Iowa City for 30 years. During this time he has humbly as- sisted thousands of University of Iowa student-athletes grow spiritu- ally, as well as academically and ath- letically. He has been a friend and a mentor these young men and women, as well as a source of sup- port, encouragement and educa- tion in choosing positive ways to live their daily lives. Jim is the husband of Laurie (Ramsey) Goodrich. Icelandic State Park to hold Christmas OpenHouse Rosemarie Myrdal to be featured speaker CAVALIER, N.D. -- The North- eastern North Dakota Heritage As- sociation (NENDHA) and Icelandic State Park extends an invitation to the annual Christmas Open House on Sunday, Nov. 23, at the Pioneer Heritage Center from 1 to 5 p.m. There will be trees donated by lo- cal growers and artificial trees that were decorated by volunteers to showcase holiday spirit. Various local groups and individuals have donated their time, talents and re- sources to make each bulb on the trees throughout the Pioneer Her- itage Center shine bright! The ethnic tree this year will be Austria. The tree will be unveiled at 1:45 p.m. according to Austrian tra- ditions where a bell is rung to sum- mon the children to view the tree. There will also be information near the tree in the exhibit area depicting these traditions. This year's theme features music and entertainment in- fluenced by the "Sound of Music." Suzanne Larson will be playing her violin in the exhibit area from 1 to 2 p.m. After the unveiling of the tree, Rosemarie Myrdal will be the fea- tured speaker on Austria traditions followed by music from the Stegrnan family. Dessert and re- freshments will follow featuring traditional Austrian foods. Santa will stop in for some pho- to opportunities and good cheer for kids and adults from 3 to 4 p.m. Santa will also have a special mail- box at the Pioneer Heritage Center for kids to put their wish lists and let- ters in. Just in case you cannot make it to the Christmas Open House, the display can be viewed anytime during regular Heritage Center hours from Nov. 23 through De- cember. The Pioneer Heritage Cen- ter at Icelandic State Park is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m, It is closed Satur- day and open Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. The Heritage Center will be closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. The center will be closing at noon on Christmas Eve. For more information contact Char Binstock at (701) 265-4561. I What are you celebrating? Let us help share your excitement: Charges apply for open house invitations. Thanks Walsh County Voters for your vote in the general election. Diane M. Link, Walsh County Recorder We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to all our relatives, friends and neighbors for their many acts of kindness shown during the death of our beloved Mother, Grandmother and Great Grandmother, Lillian Hove. A special "Thank You" to Pastor Jodi Myrvik and the Chaplain at Altru Hospital for their words of comfort, Tollefson Funeral Home for their excellent services, Mountain Lutheran Church Ladies Aid for serving a delicious lunch, to Jeff Boe and Delores Boe for the beautiful music, to the pallbearers and to all those who sent cards and comforting words, memorials and flowers and who brought food to our homes. Also, thankyou to Unity Hospital, Valley Ambulance Service andAItru Hospital for their services. A "Big Thank You" to the kind gentlemen at Hugo's Store in Grafton who helped Mom get out to the car the night of October 17th. Your kindness will not be forgotten. The Family of Lillian I. Hove Your Professional Prescription Service We offer.. Mail-Out Prescriptions. Delivery Service. Blood Pressure Screening. Photo Kiosk. 10% off Sr Citizen Discount, Zoovio Video Dealer. Gifts. Hallmark Cards. Drive-up Window Ye Olde Medicine Center Park River. 701-284-7676 Drayton Drug Drayton. 701-454-3831 THE WALSH COUNTY PRESS WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 19, 2014 Pae 3 I Walsh County Spotlight The merchants below are X proud to announce: Thanksgiving Service, lPark River B00le Camp Area Thanksgiving Service will be held on Tuesday, Nov. 25, at 7 pm at the Park River Bible Camp, rural Park River, ND. Sponsored by the Western Walsh County Ministerium. Interested in becoming a spotlight sponsor? Contact the Press at 701-284-6333 COUNTY ESS Park River PO Box 49 284-6333 / y ('72 .,,Lnarltan I .... Park River l [ 301 County Road 12B 284'7115 [ Park River l Implement 284-6316 [ iR Park River ~ 284-7244 Adams ~ 944-2231 Grafton ~ 352-3668 T UNITED Michigan ~ 259-2112 --"Bank & Insurance Hoople ~ 894-6123 Crystal ~ 657-2168 110 4th St. E Park River 284-7221 Jim'! Super Yalu 284-6433 101 3rd St. W Park River For all your dinner needs! Electri "Where Quality is Standard" RmDENnAt & COMMErCiAL NEW WOV( OR REMOOEL EMERGENCY SERVICE AVAILABLE Call 70 t -33 I - 1579 Scott Wedel, Owner saelectric. 14@g mail.corn Veterans Ave. S,-Park River, ND III |31-2939 ;ment FOR THE TROOPS -Walsh County Veterans Service Office Re/x00says 60,000 0000eransget tr/p/e Nearly 60,000 veterans were triple dippers last year, drawing a total of $3.5 billion in military retirement pay plus veterans and Social Security disability benefits at the same time, congressional auditors report. It's all legal. The average payment was about $59,000, but about 2,300 veterans, or 4 percent of the total, received concurrent payments of $100,000 or more, the Government Accountability Office said. The highest payment was to a veteran who received $208,757 in com- bined payments in 2013. Some lawmakers say the report shows the need for better coordination among government programs that are facing severe financial con- straints. The Social Security Disability Insurance trust fund could run out of money in as soon as two years, government officials say. "We should fulfill our promises to the men and women who serve, but we need to streamline these duplicative programs," said Sen. Tom Coburn, R-Okla., who requested the study. Veterans groups disagree. They say the retirement money was earned for years of service in the military, while disability payments are com- pensation for service-related injuries and wounds. In most cases, veterans who receive a combination of benefits are se- verely disabled. About 4 in 5 veterans who got triple payments had a dis- ability rating of at least 50 percent, the GAO said. Nearly half of those receiving triple payments were at least 60 years old. Louis Celli Jr., a Washington representative for the American Legion, said critics of the multiple benefits are "misguided and uninformed." He said the report "should simply be filed in the category of one of Sen. Cobum's parting shots to loyal upstanding American patriots who have sacrificed so much for this country." Cobum, a longtime critic of government spending, is retiring at the end of the year. He said in an interview that the report raises legitimate ques- tions about whether disability benefits are getting to those who truly need them. "This is billions of doUars a year in duplicative payments," Cobum said. "We ought to reassess and say, 'Are we doing more than take care of peo- pie in need?' I'm not against the military. I don't think they should be triple dipping.;" Most Americans would find it hard to understand how someone mak- ing $86,000 a year in tax-exempt VA income qualifies for Social Secu- rity Disability Insurance, when civilian workers are disqualified from the program if they make as little as $13,000 a year, Cobum said. Only ! 7 percent of those who received multiple forms ofcompensati0n had suffered a combat-related disability, according to the GAO. Veterans have long been exempted from rules that deny Social Secu- rity benefits to anyone with other income exceeding $13,000 a year. But until the Sept. 11,2001, terrorist attacks, veterans were barred from receiving both military retirement pay and Department of Veterans Af- fairs' disability benefits. Under a Civil War-era statute, the Pentagon docked retirement pay dollar-for-dollar up to the amount of disability benefits from the VA. With bipartisan support, Congress changed that law in 2002, gradual- ly restoring military retirement p to veterans also drawing disability ben- efits from the VA. "Our nation's status as the world's only superpower is largely due to the sacrifices our veterans made in the last century," Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., said in March 2002 when the bill was being debated. "Rather than honoring their commitment and bravery by fulfilling ow obligations, the federal government has chosen to perpetuate this lon- standing injustice," Reid said. "Quite simply, this is disgraceful and ve must correct it." ]. At the time, then-Sen. John Warner, R-Va., a former Navy secretary, posCxl a question to fellow senators: "How can we ask the men and women wtio have so faithfully served to sacrifice a portion of their retirement because they are also receiving compensation for an injury suffered while serv- ing their country?" Warner acknowledged that the change would have "significant cost," but added; "Is the cost too high? I think not." About 3 percent of the nation's 1.9 million military retirees collect all three benefits, the GAO said. The report did not recommend changes to the program. The VA said in a response that it "generally agrees" with the report's conclusions. Social Security officials did not comment. If you have any questions or concerns please feel free to contact the Walsh County Veteran Service Office at 701-352-5030 or stop by for a visit at 638 Cooper Avenue Suite 5 Grafton, ND 58237. Chris Kratochvil * Walsh County Veterans Service Officer Administrative Building, 638 Cooper Ave Ste 5, Grafton By Jim Miller Dear Savvy Senior, Can Medicare help me quit smoking? I just turned 65, and wouM like to quit but need some help. Coughing Connie Dear Connie, Yes, Medicare actually covers up to eight face-to-face counseling sessions a year to help beneficiaries quit smoking. And, if you have a Medicare Part D prescription drug plan, certain smoking-cessation medications are covered too. Here are some other tips that can help you kick the habit. Never Too Late Of the 46 million Americans who smoke, about 5.5 million are Medicare beneficiaries. According to the Center of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), about 50 percent of smokers, age 65 and older, indi- cate they would like to completely quit, but because of the nicotine, which is considered to be more ad- dictive than heroin, it's very difficult to do. Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable illness, responsible Savvy Cont. page 5 Jim Goodrich named Honorary Letterwinner at University of Iowa CAVALIER, N.D. -- In recog- nition of his outstanding service and dedication to the University of Iowa Athletics Department, Jim Goodrich has been selected as an Honorary Letterwinner. Jim has been the Director of Athletics inAc- tion in Iowa City for 30 years. During this time he has humbly as- sisted thousands of University of Iowa student-athletes grow spiritu- ally, as well as academically and ath- letically. He has been a friend and a mentor these young men and women, as well as a source of sup- port, encouragement and educa- tion in choosing positive ways to live their daily lives. Jim is the husband of Laurie (Ramsey) Goodrich. Icelandic State Park to hold Christmas OpenHouse Rosemarie Myrdal to be featured speaker CAVALIER, N.D. -- The North- eastern North Dakota Heritage As- sociation (NENDHA) and Icelandic State Park extends an invitation to the annual Christmas Open House on Sunday, Nov. 23, at the Pioneer Heritage Center from 1 to 5 p.m. There will be trees donated by lo- cal growers and artificial trees that were decorated by volunteers to showcase holiday spirit. Various local groups and individuals have donated their time, talents and re- sources to make each bulb on the trees throughout the Pioneer Her- itage Center shine bright! The ethnic tree this year will be Austria. The tree will be unveiled at 1:45 p.m. according to Austrian tra- ditions where a bell is rung to sum- mon the children to view the tree. There will also be information near the tree in the exhibit area depicting these traditions. This year's theme features music and entertainment in- fluenced by the "Sound of Music." Suzanne Larson will be playing her violin in the exhibit area from 1 to 2 p.m. After the unveiling of the tree, Rosemarie Myrdal will be the fea- tured speaker on Austria traditions followed by music from the Stegrnan family. Dessert and re- freshments will follow featuring traditional Austrian foods. Santa will stop in for some pho- to opportunities and good cheer for kids and adults from 3 to 4 p.m. Santa will also have a special mail- box at the Pioneer Heritage Center for kids to put their wish lists and let- ters in. Just in case you cannot make it to the Christmas Open House, the display can be viewed anytime during regular Heritage Center hours from Nov. 23 through De- cember. The Pioneer Heritage Cen- ter at Icelandic State Park is open Monday through Friday from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m, It is closed Satur- day and open Sunday from 1 to 5 p.m. The Heritage Center will be closed Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. The center will be closing at noon on Christmas Eve. For more information contact Char Binstock at (701) 265-4561. I What are you celebrating? Let us help share your excitement: Charges apply for open house invitations. Thanks Walsh County Voters for your vote in the general election. Diane M. Link, Walsh County Recorder We wish to extend our heartfelt thanks to all our relatives, friends and neighbors for their many acts of kindness shown during the death of our beloved Mother, Grandmother and Great Grandmother, Lillian Hove. A special "Thank You" to Pastor Jodi Myrvik and the Chaplain at Altru Hospital for their words of comfort, Tollefson Funeral Home for their excellent services, Mountain Lutheran Church Ladies Aid for serving a delicious lunch, to Jeff Boe and Delores Boe for the beautiful music, to the pallbearers and to all those who sent cards and comforting words, memorials and flowers and who brought food to our homes. Also, thankyou to Unity Hospital, Valley Ambulance Service andAItru Hospital for their services. A "Big Thank You" to the kind gentlemen at Hugo's Store in Grafton who helped Mom get out to the car the night of October 17th. Your kindness will not be forgotten. The Family of Lillian I. Hove Your Professional Prescription Service We offer.. Mail-Out Prescriptions. Delivery Service. Blood Pressure Screening. Photo Kiosk. 10% off Sr Citizen Discount, Zoovio Video Dealer. Gifts. Hallmark Cards. Drive-up Window Ye Olde Medicine Center Park River. 701-284-7676 Drayton Drug Drayton. 701-454-3831