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Park River , North Dakota
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October 13, 2021     Walsh County Press
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October 13, 2021
 

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FROM THE EDITOR'S DESK... BY ALLISON OLIMB Eprron, WALSH COUNTY PRESS Rural people are always referred to as “resilient.” We are “Creative.” We are “hardy.” ‘ It is all marketing. It’s like when you say a tiny house is “cozy.” It is code for being in a constant state of survival mode. It is honest M Elwyn Robinson, historian ‘ October- 13, 2021 —Today is the birthday of historian Elwyn Robin- son; many Dakota Datebook seg— ments have been helped along be- cause of his exceptional research. Robinson was the son of a photog- rapher and was born near Cleveland, Ohio, in 1905. Elwyn displayed many interests as a child, including tennis, handball, marksmanship, football and the game of chess. He graduated frorn Oberlin College with an English degree in 1928 and spent the next two years at a small school where he served as the prin- cipal, teacher and coach. He was en— gaged to a colleague, Eva Foster, in 1930, and spent the next six years earning his masters and doctorate ‘ degrees in American History. During this time, Robinson also accepted a job offer from UND. On September 2, 1935, Eva and Elwyn got married and immediately set out for North Dakota. Their first years in Grand Forks were tough, both fi- nancially and because Robinson be- David Adler, TheAlturas Institute David Adler answers your Constitution questions. Send them to this newspaper. , Supreme Court’s M authority engulfed by storms and polarizatiOn The Supreme Court’s authority, grounded since the dawn of the re- public in its prestige and reputation, now faces the storms that have overwhelmed Congress and the ‘ Presidency and diminished the in- stitutional popularity of our politi- cal branches. A recent Gallup poll revealed that just 40% of the Amer- ican people approve of the per- formance of the nation’s highest tri— bunal. The political polarization that has torn apart our grand republic represents a grave threat to the perception of the court as an apo- . litical body rendering detached, authoritative decisions that pre— serve and protect the rule of law and fulfill expectations of it as a mouth- piece for the Constitution. Several Justices, just prior to the opening of the court’s new term, have addressed public concerns. Justice Amy Comey Barrett, the newest member of the court, told a Kentucky audience last month that her job was to persuade the audience the Justices are not a bunch of “partisan hacks.” Justicesfitephen Breyer and Clarence Thomas, the greybeards Of the cOurt, declared that the differences among the Jus- tices are attributable to difierentju—_ dicial philosophies, not politics. v Justice Samuel Alito, one of six re- publican appointees serving on the High Bench, stated defensively that some critics portray the court as having been captured by a cabal that resorts to “sneaky methods” of considering cases before it, a char- acterization, he noted, that repre- sents an “unprecedented” effort to “intimidate” and damage the court. These public statements in recent weeks dovetail the long-standing ef- fort of Chief Justice John Roberts to protect the court against charges that its members promote their own political preferences. (ignxl . ' _, barman tan Souch Paar: Rwrzu wérr, I'm back at it again after tak- ing a few days off. My three children were all home together in Fordvillefor the first time in 5 years. We didn't do much, just hung out, ate a lot of homecooked food and goodies, played some cards, and just thoroughly en- joyed being together. I loved it, just it; came seriously ill As for their new ly a little exhausting. I’ve been set to the survival mode mindset so long I am not even sure if I have an off switch. If I moved to a beach town where they “live on is— land time.” It would take a lot of re- rogramming. PRESS PERSPECTIVES WALSH COUNTY PRESS - WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER l3, 2021 You may have heard about this se- cret shopper conversation where a gentleman named Roger Brooks \ has been taking notes on every town in the region. The conversations are bring broken down by county with the Walsh County workshop taking place from 9 to 11-230 am. on Thurs- day, Oct 14 at the Minto Community Center. He might tell us many of the things we already know because we are resilient, creative, and hardy folks. We need to offer the things to get the people but we need the peo- ple to get the things. It is a vicious cy-V cle but it is one that only stops spin- ‘4’; Dakota Datebook On this day in North Dakota past home, they fell in love with ND, and Robinson gradually became en- grossed in the state’s history. It’s written that Robinson was popular with students and faculty alike. C. Norman Boehm Jr. was a chemical engineering student who, in 1950, found he needed just two more credit hours to graduate. He writes, “I enrolled in summer school and took...two electives...Music Appreciation and History of the Trans-Mississippi West. The latter course, taught by (Professor Robin- son), was a history of the Plains In~ dians. Never had I eXperienced such enthusiasm by a teacher who was able to convey that enthusiasm to his pupils (at least this one). Pro- fessor Robinson generated within me a lifelong interest and concern for Native Antericans, their culture, their history, and their woefirl mis- Clearly, the Justices are em- barked on a mission to protect the court’s institutional integrity and its mission as an impersonal .vessel through which the court speaks. This mission is not new, of course, for the Justices, across two-and—one— half centuries, have viewed them- selves as the primary defenders of the court’s reputation. To many scholars, the duty of preserving the court’s reputation, and thus its prestige, explains why, until re- . cent decades, and with. few excep— tions, the Justices have moved cau- tious1y,iaking incremmtal steps its interpretation of the Constitution, rather than resorting to leaps and bounds in reshaping and overtum— ing precedents. Historically, the court has been reluctant to lead the nation. Exceptions to this rule of be- havior can be found, of course, as in Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, in which the court over- turned a 60—year—old precedent and held that segregation in public schools is unconstitutional. And in Engel V. Vitale (1962), when the court held that school-led prayer in public schools violates the Estab- lishment Clause separation of church and state. And, perhaps more famously, in Roe v. Wade ' (1973), in which the court upheld a woman’s right to abortion. The courts’ wariness in taking bold steps reflects unhappy histor- ical moments. For example, its rul- ing in Dred Scott v. Sandford (185 7), that the Constitution did not include American citizenship for African-Americans, backfired, and the court’s reputation was badly damaged, rendering it vulnerable to political attacks by Congress, for roughly 25 years. i For the court to lead the nation, and convince the citizenry that it is interpreting the Constitution in a manner free of political motives, it must be able to muster persuasive reasoning to defend its holdings and then rely on millions of supporters, and thousands of low—level gov- ernmental officials to embrace and enforce its rulings. The court, as Alexander Hamilton emphasized in Federalist No. 78, lacks the power to enforce its decisions. As a con- sequence, disregard of the court’s rulings undercuts its reputation and thus its power. We the People Cont page 9 Happenings at Our Good Samaritan Vicki Best, Activity Director what the doctor ordered for this mem. This past week due to covid, things changed slightly, visits are outside and no volunteers in the building, but we make it all Work. Thanks to our ded- icated staff we do what needs to be done. We still enjoyed bingo, paint- ed on dish towels, played a game of treatment and neglect by the US. Government,” said Boehm. From 1947 to 1949, Robinson connected with the public, too, by broadcasting a radio series titled “Heroes of Dakota.” He also in- troduced a new class into the UND curriculum dealing with North Dakota history, and it quickly be- came a student favorite. Robinson’s great life’s work was History of North Dakota, which was the culmination of 20 years of research. The 600-page book traces the state’s history from its early be- ginnings to the mid-1960s, and it re— ceived the Award of Merit from the American Association for State and Local History. A review by Hi- ram Drache in the Journal of Amer- ican History says, “The title ofEl- wyn Robinson’s book is a‘ gross un- ‘ derstatement. It is anthropology, ge- Vigfifiigx , .Jttafaii's‘i‘i Many Citizens Should Be Impeached ning in one spot if someone steps in to redirect. He might have some good ' ideas to help us see the bigger picture. Let’s stop being hardy, creative, re— silient folk who grind out every day on the prairie making do with what we have. Let’s be adventurous. Let’s em- brace a life of contentment. Let’s not merely survive. Let’s thrive. Sounds a lot more like the sales pitch that convinced a whole gener- ation of settlers that this place is the one to hitch your horse to. We’ve got room for dreaming. Like” the Walsh County Press on Facebook ography, socrology, economics, ethnology, political science, na- ture study and theology interwov— en into one...volume.” Elwyn Robinson emerged from his research with a theory he called “Too Much Mistake.” He felt that people who arrived in North Dako- ta in the 18805 became overly op- timistic about settlement, because the state was experiencing above— . average rainfall during those years. Eastemers who moved here ex- pected weather conditions similar to what they left behind, and the gov- ernment believed a homestead of 160 acres could adequately provide for any fanrily that worked hard, enough. Reality proved them wrong. Robinson believed that these and other factors soon led to “too many farms, too many miles of railroads and roads, too many towns, banks, schools, colleges, churches, and governmental insti- tutions.” The state simply couldn’t support that much growth within Dakota Datebook Cont page I By Lloyd Omdahl Citizenship is a public office in which electors are 'blessed with certain rights and charged with civic responsibilities. Unfortunate- ly, more people demand their rights than their responsibilities so the state suffers from a chronic defi- ciency in participation and judgment Government has hit bottom in public trust, now standng at one- ' third the level that prevailed in the Eisenhower-Kennedy years. Citi- zens spend more time bad-mouthing the government than appreciating it. This attitude is affecting the ability of the government to function. In spite of all the glitches in our policymaking, the will of the peo- ple is manifested in a democratic so- ciety. And with the expansive polling being done these days the will of the people is measured regularly. If something is wrong with the government, the people must share the blame. Their erratic response to public issues reflects their lack of ability to support wise government, policies. During the Trump administration, liberal observers were quick to, point out the president’s personal flaws. But it was not only President Trump to blame for the mounting hostility that now permeates the whole society. He did get 63,000,000 votes, honestly cast and counted by bona fide citizens. While Trump is no longer the ma- jor player, citizens have taken up the Cudgels and even tried to over- throw the government, a similar ef- fort in the Civil War that resulted in more American deaths than all oth- er wars combined. This is not to say that citizens aren’t entitled to oppose government policy they consider adverse to their interests and values. With such a broad demographic mix in the United States, peace can only be maintained as long as compromise is possible. ‘ We seem to have arrived at a point when compromise is no longer possible. Opinions are too rigid to al- low giving ground for the purpose of social peace. In Washington, compromise has become a bad word because the cit- izens who elect representatives will Sequence, had our nails’done, had de- votions and watched the Disney movie "Monsters, Inc“. This week we hope things will be back on track. We plan to have de- votions with J eannen McMillan and Pastor Hinrichs, bake some Kolach— es on Tuesday, make toilet paper pumpkins forArts and Crafts, have the monthly birthday party for the resi- , dents, and watch the movies "Grumpy Old Men" and It's the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown" as well as our usual daily chronicles, exercise, bingo, nails and rosary. not toleratecompromise. The coun- try has become ungovemable. Equally divided between the two parties, polls show that partisanship has increased. If this is a democrae cy that'reflects the'ywill of the peo- ple, we have to conclude that the cit~ izens have become more partisan and less willing to compromise. The Republican Party has done nothing but subtract fiom the wis— dom of Congress while the De- mocrats can’t even agree to com- promise within their own ranks. So if the defects of government result from an incompetent citi- zenry, we carmot expect better poli- cies until the citizens get their act to- gether. Many of the policymakers have proposed that the citizenry needs to have a better grasp of their responsibilities before the sit- uation will improve. The truth is that more and more people are holing up in their bur- rows. Instead of developing a broad— er view of society, they have elec- tronic toys for adults and kids to sit in corners and avoid the general so- ciety. “Online” may be more flexi- ble and available but it stifles the so- cial interaction of young people in their formative years. , We have a problem with a lack of “cognitive flexibility” which simply means the ability to mentally rec— ognize that change is required but we are not flexible enough to respond. All facets of society — social, eco- nonric and political — are changing so fast that they have outrun our abil- ity to comprehend and change. COVID and all of its facets yet unknown is an example of our in- ability to comprehend and respond. COVID and Delta will not be de- feated by a divided citizenry that cannot see the need for a near- unanimous response. While we may wish that citizens master the duties of their offices, it is not going to happen. They no longer have the perspective or the will to become rational officehold- ers in a form of government that re- quires more than they are willing to give. RWSWV I. a {tr-9.4 7a. :th Thanks to everyone for working to- gether during this COVID craziness. We just need to be here for our resi- ' dents and help to brighten their days. A special thank you to Jeannen McMillan arid Pastor Hinrichs for shar- ing their messages with us each week and an extra special thank you to Shirley for leading Rosary for us every Monday, it‘s greatly appreciat- ed. Please continue to stay healthy and safe. God Bless everyone. Try These 5 Kitchen Fire Safety Questions Citizenship is a public office in which electors are blessed with cer- tain rights and charged with civic responsibilities. Unfortunately, more people demand their rights than their responsibilities so the state suffers fiom a chronic deficiency ' participation and judgment. Government has hit bottom in public 'trust, now standing at one- third the level that prevailed in the Eisenhower-Kennedy years. Citi- zens spend more time bad- mouthirrg the government than ap- preciating it. This attitude is af- fecting the ability of the government to firnction. In spite of all the glitches in our .policymaking, the will of the peo— ple is manifested in a democratic so- ciety. And with the expansive polling being done these days the will of the people is measured reg- . ularly. If something is wrong with the government, the people must share the blame. Their erratic response to public issues reflects their lack of , ability to support wise govern- ment policies. During the Trump administra- tiorr, liberal observers were quick to point out the president’s personal flaws. But it was not only President Trump to blame for the mounting hostility that now permeates the whole society. He did get 63,000,000 votes, honestly cast and counted by bona fide citizens. While Trump is no longer the major player, citizens have taken up the cudgels and even tried to over— throw the government, a similar ef- fort in the Civil War that resulted in more American deaths than all other wars combined. This is not to say that citizens aren’t entitled to oppose govemv ment policy they consider adverse to their interests and values. With such a broad demographic mix in the United States, peace can only be maintained as long as, compro— mise is possible, . We seem "i "‘hfie’aniibd are point when compromise is no longer possible. Opinions are too rigid to allow giving ground for the purpose of social peace. In Washington, compromise has Around Walsh County Extension Office [Wauielhne NDSU Extension Service ‘ By Julie Garden-Robinson, Food and Nutrition Specialist Pae 5 izens who elect representatives will not tolerate compromise. The country has become ungovemable. Equally divided between the two parties, polls show that parti- sanship has increased. If this is a democracy that reflects the will of the people, we have to conclude that the citizens have become more partisan and less willing to com- promise. The Republican Party has done nothing but subtract from the wis- dom of Congress while the De- mocrats can’t even agree to com- promise within their own ranks. So if the defects of government result from an incompetent citi- zenry, we cannot expect better policies until the citizens get their act together. Many of the policy- makers have proposed that the cit- izenry needs to have a better grasp of their responsibilities before the situation will improve. The truth is that more and more ‘ people are holing up in their bur-' rows. Instead of developing a broader view of society, they have electronic toys for adults and kids to sit in corners and avoid the gen- eral society. “Online” may be more flexible and available but it stifles the social interaction of young people in their formative years. We have a problem with a lack of “cognitive flexibility” which simply means the ability to mentally recognize that change is required but we are not flexible enough to re- spond. All facets of society — social, economic and political are chang- ing so fast that they have outrun our ability to comprehend and change. COVID and all of its facets yet unknown is an example of our in- ability to comprehend and respond. COVID and Delta will not be de- feated by a divided citizenry that cannot see the need for a near-unan- imous response. While we may wish that citizens master the duties of their offices, it is not going to happen. They no longer have the perspective or the will to become rational office- holders in a form of government that requires more than they are willing to give. Julie Garden-Robinson, Ph.D.. R.D., L.R.D., is a North Dakota State University Extension food and nutrition specialist and professor in the De— partment of Health, Nutrition and Exemise Sciences. Follow her on Twitter @jgarden- mbinson the County Park River 284—6624 By Extension Agent Brad Brummond Dates to Remember Oct 20—23 Walsh County Fair Walsh County Fair We are moving forward with the fair. We are highly recommending masks but at this point they are not required. We are doing what we can to try and be as safe as possible but we can’t get the risk level to zero. Ifthis makes you uncomfortable we would ask you to stay home. Also‘ know that there will most likely be a lot of people not masked up. If this makes you uncomfortable stay home. You need to decide what is best for your family. We will not make that call. If you come you have accepted the risk of partici- pating. I would also ask those that bring their children to the fair and drop them off please not to do it. We want parents to accompany their children at the fair. Unsuper- vised children have a way of find- ing things to do and not all of them are positive. We look forward to seeing you or wish you well if you decide to stay home. We under- stand. Soil Testing Critical With high fertilizer prices we need to make the most efficient use of our fertilizer dollars possible. It has always boggled my mind that so many producers do not soil test and just take a shot in the dark when purchasing fertility inputs. This may have worked financially in the past but with the rise in prices it no longer works-Applying fer- tilizer without a soil test leads to un- der or over applying nutrients and in most cases it leads to over ap- plying as they want to be safe and just throw a larger amount at it to cover their lack of any real sound information for making the deci- sion. You will never hear from me not to apply fertility to your crops that makes economic sense. If you fail to plan for a successful crop you plan for failure. On the other hand, throwing more inputs at a crop to get more yield where your inputs are costing you more money than what can be gained by the addi- tional investment also makes no sense. SunfloWers and flax, ac- cOrding to Dr. Franzen, do not re- quire phosphorus no matter how low the level so here is a place not i to invest you limited dollars. An- other way is to go to Dr. David Franzen’s website and use his ni- trogen and potassium calculators for how much you need, you are going to need a soil test to do this and the cost of your fertilizer. The site is https://www.ndsu.edu/snrs/peoi ple/faculty/dave_franzen/.- Look for his calculators on the right . side of the page. This makes things really easy. The other way is to go ‘ to NDSU fertility recommendations for the other crops. Here is the link https://www.ag.ndsu.edu/publica- tions/crops/north-dakota-fertiliz- er—recommendatiOn—tables-and- equations. We need to apply what we need but I am not into the builder rates that used to be so pop- - ular. What should we be doing now? We need to be soil sampling and getting good base information to make our decisions on. Ifthere'ever was a-year to invest in soil tests this is the year. Use the soil tests and go to the calculators and look at the ’ recommendations. Look at how much fertility is in the soil. We do not need to apply that amount. Ap- ply what you need and no more.