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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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September 27, 1956     Walsh County Press
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September 27, 1956
 

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DIAL 36522 or 46341 INSURANCE.ABIE:NCY PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA -- AUTO - HOSPITAL Do you know that for over 37 yeats the  AGENCY has been the only Insurance Agency in the ty of Park River that makes its living solely from the selling of insurance. When you want insurance us for expert advice on all kinds oi coverages. FIRE - FARM LIABILITY ANNUITIES - SAVINGS PLAN WALSH COUNTY PRES!S ---- TIIIS ISSUE THIS ISSUE HAS WILL REACH PAGES 5,600 READEIW V0L. 73 PARK RIVER, WALSH COUNTY, N. D. THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 1956 , NUMBER 32 operated Landsborough's cor- played in the savings bonds pro- 37 years, but his health gram in the county at a meeting of he feels that he must Commercial club at Fordville Mon- day evening. ! Business Man Bond Sales Aided Henning Gunhus CropsAssoc!ation l i By Volunteers Suggests Pr,ces Wa ace E Warner Day s From Store InaWalsh COU?otY Rites Set Friday For New Varieties ob " d S d ;ement in this issue of "ountysavings dsVol- Funera services wiilbeheldFri- During lastwinterandspringthe To Be serve atur ay announces that E. R. unteers were honored guests and re- day (tomorrow) for Henning Gun- Walsh County Crop Improvement will go out of the ceived Special Treasury Awards in hus, prominent Edinburg man. who Association distributed new grain business. He has owned recognition of the key roles each died Sept. 24, 1956, at St. Ansgar's varieties to several hundred Walsh Gordon Larson. Park River, Coun- ty Savings Bond Chairman. presid- ed at the meeting and Mr. Whitman of Fargo made the presentations "for the Treasury Department. In a brief talk, Mr. Whitman mentioned that the cash value of E and H savings bonds in Welsh county at present is 12z million dollars. He stressed the safety of t his bond, stating that if lost. stolen or destroyed, the govern- ment will replace it without any charge to the owner. All the newspapers in the county received awards. They are The Walsh County Record, Grafton, The Welsh County Press. Park River, The Tri-County Sun, Fordville and the Walsh County Times, Adams. Schools who qualified for the award were Grafton Public School, Forest River and Fordville. Larson received a silver medallion in recognition of his work as chair- man in aiding the county to exceed its assigned quota, which was $864,812. Total sales amounted to $952,343. Banks which reached their sales quota for 1955 were given awards. They were First State Bank. Park River: Bank of 'Minto: Citizens State Bank, Lankin and its station at Edinburg; The Walsh County State Bank, Grafton. and its sta- tions at Fordville, Forest River, St. Thomas and Hoople. P-TA Discusses Hot Lunch Program The executive committee of the Park River P-TA announced Mon- day evening that the elementary mchool's, hot lunch program would begin OCt. 15. Meeting in their first regular montthly session of the new School term, the parents and teach- ers heard President Mrs. Blair K. Chapman announce that no high school students would be provided for under this year's set-up. groceries and meat will be out. Some fixtures will be Landsborough says he does to leave Park River and disposition will be made of )re building is not definite, al- a transaction pertaining to Under consideration, he said. Ila.ks Announce Scholarships ' several years the banks in 1 County have given three $125 to young men from the that attend the eight week Short Course in Agriculture. Year they are offering the again; therefore, if you in applying for the please contace any of in Walsh County or the Agent for information and blanks. short course starts January ends March 2, 1957. Courses d include Farm Management, Selection, Rural Electri- Forage Crops, Farm Trac- tor Enjoyment, Horti- Crops, Livestock Health, and Games and Sports. applying for the must be (1) at least 1"/ age must have cornplet. (3) be in good health be living on farms and be in farming as a life work. to write, call, or visit your or County Agent for more e for Potato Entries Oct 1 entered hospital in Park River. He had beer. in poor health the past four months and had been hos- pitalized five weeks. Rev. S. O. Kvaale will officiate at the service which will be held at Trinity Lutheran church in Edin- burg at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in Trinity cemetery. The Jensen Funeral Home of Ed- inburg is in charge of arrangements. The body will lie in state at the Funeral Home on Thursday and un- til noon Friday. A resident of the Edinburg com- munity for 60 years, Mr. Gunhus had been active in community, civic and church affairs throughout his long residence there. He served as a member of the State legislature from 1916 to 1920. He was a member and an active worker in the Non- partisan League since it was organ- ized. A charter member of the Edin- burg Farmers Elevator Company, Mr. Gunhus served on the firm's first board of directors. He assisted in organizing the Edinburg and Tib- er Telephone Company. In addition, he was active in the Edinburg Com- munity club and in the Farmers Union. Born August 17. 1867 at Kenyon, in Goodhue County, Minnesota, Mr. Gunhus spent his early life in that area, coming to Tiber township near Edinburg in the spring of 1886. He married Anne Baker of Kenyon on June 22, 1893. The couple lived on the farm in Tiber township un- til 10 years ago when they moved to Edinburg. Mrs. Gunhus died in 1954. Survivors are a daughter, Mrs. Selina Bjorneby, a teacher in the Park River Grade School, a son, Ed- roy Gunhus, of Edinburg; a grand- daughter, Mrs. John Dusell, of Ath- erton, Calif., and a grandson Paul Bjorneby of Edinburg. There are also seven great grandchildren. Other survivors are two sisters and a brother at Kenyon Minn., and a brother, at Grand Forks. They in- clude Mrs. Etta Marcuson, Mrs. Os- car Sahl, Anton and George Gunhus, After considerable discussion as for Dakota to the methe of dispensing meal qu.n. to a a of 00rs0., LOcal Brlvers Win Wiliiam ]a! I, was rmml. Y.o mee withAhe school in charge of pears a wor OUt a atisfactory IIacln Ho n ors program lot both iituaents and fac- first two girls to be entered ulty. The biggest obstacle to last Park River drivers again took the were Judy Mater, 17, year's method, stated Mrs. Owen honorsat the stock car races Sunday sponsored by Johnson McGowan, grade school principal, in Grand Forks at the Fairgrounds. Park River; and Myrna was that the teachers had to sacri- 16, Northwood, sponsored Stephenson at North- to the rules of the con- girls must be 16 years of must be residents of and must be spon- a grower or shipper of Deadline for candidates the contest, said Mrs. Hall, 1. queen will be named at the the county fair and state to be held at Park 22 to Oct. 25. A long list prizes will be given to The prizes will be on booth at the fair each lice valuable class time in the morn- ings. With the increase in this year's enrollment, went on Mrs. McGowar4 such a procedure would not be advisable. Appointed to the three- man delegation were Blair Chap- man, Henry Kelly and Mrs, Peder Pederson. In other business the group heard Mrs. Chapman report on the area conference which was held in Grand Forks last Saturday. She told the members that arrangements were being made to hold a district meet- ing in Adams at a later date. The Park River assembly voted to ex- tend their assistance to Adams ,by sponsoring a coffee hour at that time. Before adjourning the parents and teachers hstened to Joe Kouba, pVCAS band instructor,-as he ex- ained a long-range band program for th grade school and the hign scnool. At present he stated, the high school band ]as only 24 mem- bers, yet are til]' sadly in need of instrumems, music and uniforms Contributions of any ...... + , ;11' undoubtedly b m Order he quip- ped, as soon a.q we get 'ora,ie, enough to find your houses . Wha't makes the future look brigh'ter, he pointed out, is the 64 new enrollees in the grades. For the next six months Kouba went on. there will be band classes at the grade school starting at 1 P. M. on Monday, Wed- nesday and Friday of each week. In conjunction with the appearance of the WCAS bandmaster. Les Ander- son, Grafton musm store owner, demonstrated various instruments and explained a rental program for beginning band members. FORGET-ME-NOT SALES SUCCESSFUL IN CITY The Forget-Me-Not sale in Park River last Saturday was very suc- cessful, according Mrs. Marvin Sorenson, chairman. She ated that 775 blue flowers..Tne Park River Decca club was m charge of sales. Mrs. Sorenson thanked the public for their wonderfm support. NO PRIZE TAKER THIS WEEK For the second week in a row, the winner of the Market Day prize did not qualify for the money. The name of Mrs. Victor Turner of Park River was announced over station KNOX at 3:39 p.m. yesterday, but she was not on hand to claim the prize of $125. Last week Harold Peo- ples was the winner, but w not here to get award. Next week me prize will be increased to $150. PARK RIVER GRAIN MARKET 5_.. No. 1 northern $2.06. durum, z.. ; Flax, $2.95; oats 56c; barley 75c-$1.00. Jerome Lund placed first in the main event, with Donovan Berger, second. Berger won first in the Aus- tralian pursuit race. Both young men received cash prizes. Allen Eide won first in the trophy race and in the main event had a mash-up that put him out of the competion. Plans are for several local drivers to go to Fargo Sunday for the stock car races there. Walsh County for Wallace E. War, Girls Officers the new officers of the Or- the Rainbow for Girls took an open formal in- ceremony was held. T. A. Meagher acted as in- officer for the event which in the Masonic Temple on day of last week. She was by Mrs. Elmer Argetsinger, Mrs. C. D. Lewis, recorder; Johnson, musician and Thiele, chaplain. is the new worthy ad- the Order; Jean Johnson, worthy advisor; Susan Charity; Carol Stull, of Gayle Dau, of Orr, Midgarden, record- Johnson, treasurer; Janice chaplain; Kathy Mater, Love: Carol Tur- ;ion; Kathy Thorleifson, irley Ramsey, Immortal- Morstad, Fidelity; Bon- of Orr, Confidential Oh- Patty Jurgens, Outer Oh- Brenda Neste, musician. mother, Mrs. Jake Mater, t her in office. . the meeting, luncn was Y members of the Eastern ,ghts it just don't pay to said Police Officer Henry cementing on the minor ;hat gued Park River morning. After officer made hs last culprits borke the west wall of service station, window and took residence of Mrs. Mar- and let the air out tires at various T authorities the matter. County farmers. These new varieties were distributed to the farmers with the understanding that the in- creases obtained in 1956 would be sold to neighboring farms at a reas- onable price. The prices that the of- ricers and directors of the crops as- sociation suggest are the maximum price per bushel for the various var- ieties, being as follows: Ransom Oats: Certified blue tag, $1.75 to $2.00: certified red tag. $1.50 to $1.75; certified yellow tag. $1.25 to $1.50; non certified, $1.00 to $1.25. Durum, Langdon, Yuma. certified blue tag, $3.50 to $4.00; Ramsey and Towner, certified red tag $3.25 to $3.50; certified yellow tag, $3.00 to $3.25; non-certified. $2.50 to $2.85. Durum: Verified No. 1, $3 to $3.25 (less than i% commonwheat) Veri- fied No. 2. $2.50 to $3.00 (Less than 3% common wheat). Traitl Barley: Certified blue tag: $2,10 to $2.50: certified red tag, $1.85 to $2.10: certified yellow tag, $1.60 to $1.85; non-certified. $1.40 to $1.60. Conley (ND-1) spring wheat is un- der contract and will be distributed to Waish County Farmers by the Crop Improvement Association. Far- mers wishing to obtain conley can sign up for it the evemng of Men- day,Nov. 5, when the annual meet- ing bf the County Crops Association will be held in the Park River City Hall. The price on Conley will be: Cer- tified, blue tag, rogued, $3.75 to $4; blue tag, not rouged, $3.50 to $3.75; certified red tag, $3.25 to $3.50; cer- chcked better than ever before. _ Durbqitv is built into the 1957 F'rd. through stronger alloy metMq, greater use of insulation and sounc- See ;Us For Short.Term, Low- Cost Accident Insurance Wallace E. Warner Give Results Of Fertilizer Tests Wallay and Tommy Thompson of Park River and Quinten Daley of Grafton report results on fertilizer trials conducted on barley. The trials were conducted in co- operation with the County and State Extensmn service and the Malting Barley Improvement Association of Milwaukee. Purpose of the trials was to de- termine what effect, if any, phos- phate and nitrogen fertilizers would have on yields and also if the fertil- tiffed yellow tag, $3.00 to $3.25; non- certified, $2.75 to $3. According to Harry Bergquist, of izer would effect the malting qual- Adami president; these prices are ity of the barley. the rrxtmum and it is possible.hat All that can be reported at this many farmers will have to sell some time is the effect on yields, however, of the increases for less as the sup- the results are important from the ply on some varieties is good and stand point of ordering fertilizer for will more than meet the demaRd, next year. Farmers having any questions on The trials on the Thompson farm the prices are requested to contactvre conducted on land summer fal- any the following officers or di-ed in 1955. Two varieties of bar- rectOrs or also the COunty Agent, Other officers of the association are: Henry Stoltman. Pale, Minn., vice president; Denis Monson, Edin- burg, secretary; Clarence Gaarder Park River. treasurer. Directors are: Alvin Shimek, Lan- kin. Dist. No. 1; Arnold Clements, Fairdale, District No. 2; Julian Gryde. Edinburg, District No. 3; Dean Miller, Fordville, District No. 4: Emil Paur Jr.. Pisek, District No. 5: Harold Bjorneby Hoople. District No. 6: Rolph Boone, Grafton, Dis- trict No. 7, Ralph Boone, Grafton; Ed G,|djates. Minto. Distrct No. 8: John Wysocki, Minto, District No. 9. New'57 Ford To Be SSown 00ere Oct. 3; Many Change00 Noted In Entire Oar hFOr the first time in its 53-year deadening materials, longer-wearing istory, Ford Motor Company will fabrics and plastics, and strength- produce two sizes of Ford cars, ac- ening of mechanical parts, according co:-dn to 1. S. Bateman, Park Riv- to Bateman. er Ford dealer. For the first time, a high perform- The new Ford line divides into ance V-8 engine is available as an two basic sizes, Fairlane and Cus- optional power plant on all Ford tom, plus the station wagon series, cars. The engine, called the Thun- each with its own body and chassis, derbird Special, develops 245 horse- In addition, the Fairlane series has power and is equipped with a four- been expanded to offer "Fairlane barrel low silhouette carburetor. 500" models, which have extra lux- Ford's new styling starts with ury features. The 19 new Fords wide hooded headlights and a for- which will be shown next Wednes- ward slanting grille and includes day morning will have the highest streamlined wheel openings, a wind- performance engines ever offered in shield that wraps urther around the low price field, Bateman said. the sides for better visibility, dis- The 1957 Fairlane and Fair]ane tinctive fins at the rear and con- 0 sedans are nine inches loner toured sides that gve the car a and four inches lower than last sculptured look. year's comparable models. Custom and Custom 300 sedans are more than three inches loner and nearly Former Resident three s'd on-balf inches lower than the 19. ,mod,1,. Station wagons aI . Dies in Fargo three and a half inches lower and nearly six inches Iortger. Marvin Sinjem, of Grand Forks, "There has been no serifice of formerly of Park Rver, died Sept. headroom insid the ear, In spite of 24, 1956, at the veterans nospital in the reduced height, the local dealer Fargo. He had been a patient there sad. The new frame extends to the the past six months. sides of the car and this permits the floor to be lowred inside the frame Mr, Sinjum operated a dry clean- ing business here in 1940. He was rails, i n .d tyling are nw born Sept. 15, 1911, at Brookings, S, The des g ,*. " - ' - D., but moved with his parents t o - ,. a oU,O . very dimen- zrom - r . Fosaton Minn. as a young boy. He sion is changed. Wheels, frame, rear marrie Dorofl'y Harthun there on .o arive shft, engines and every ........ .  - _ June 16, 1936. He served in World inch of sheet m .mm every ooy War II in New Guinea and the Phil- tim+ departures from style are de' ".- "- " pvst models. . eat" " h_l)ntil_i epmne. was hospitalized, Mr, Sin- Riding ease has been gr ly m- proved .by using a longer, wide- jurn had been employed by Gross- man's Dry Cleaning in Grand Forks. frame with lower pressure tires on SurvivOrs-are his wife, two sons, wider reads and em ying rede- Pfc-Dennis Sinjem, with the army signed ball-joint suspension m zron and outboard-mounted longer leaf m termany, and Douglas at home; mrirngss in bck. Bec,use there is a .ughter at home; two romers p in ahead of the rear axle, ana at sister, a Fosston. fro* rd dip on quick stoss 's Mr. nd Mrs. Bert Prke of St. Paul were here lst week to visit the former's parents, Mr. and Mrs: Alex Parke aud other relatives. PROTECTION FOR YOU AGAINST . Travel Accident . Gunshot Wounds . Other Accidents ner Day will be observed in various points throughout the county Satur- day, Sept. 29. A native of Edinburg, Warner ts Democratic candidate for governor. His present residence is at Wahpeton where he s engaged in the practice of law. Heading the committee for gener- al arrangeemnts is Mayor Lloyd Ev- erson of Grafton, assisted by Bill MoB, Don LaBonte, Robert Burke, also of Grafton. They extend an in- vitation to everyone, regardless of party affiliation to attend the var- ious events planned. The day-long program of activities will begin at Edinburg with a free breakfast served in the Community hall by Trinity Lutheran Ladies aid. The time is 9:00 to 10:30 a.m. and friends from Fairdale, Adams. Gar- dar. Hoop]e as well as Edinburg are expected to attend. Grafton will honor the Walsh county man at a smorgasbord from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m in the new arm- ory in that City. The meal will be free of charge. Assisting in the ob- servance will be residents of Au- burn. Cashel, Oakwood and Nash. Warner will speak from Grafton over radio station KILO, Grand, Forks. from 12:45 to I:00 P. IV[. Salurday. His talk will be non- political and will be in the nalure of a reetina to his friends and ac- quaintances in this area. From 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. Warner and his party will greet friends from Ardoch, Warsaw, Forest River, Voss. Veseleyville and Minto at a coffee hour in the Minto city hall. Concluding the day will be a ban- quet in the Park River City hall at 7 p. m. Tickets are $2.50 and may be obtained in Park River from Tim Vavrosky or at The Press office. A dance in the City hall with musi by Les Anderson's orchestra, will follow the banauet and will be the final event of the day. A souvenir booklet has been ptm- lished as a memento of the oecasi0n and it will be given out Saturday. Hylden Farm To Site of Plumberama tey were used, namely, Kindred L A, i .... and Traill with a plot Of eacl  A.& I iety planted wihout fertilizer for A new and uhsual dmonstration check purpoaes." One plot of each called a "plumberama" will be held variety was planted with 100 pounds of 8-32-0 applied with fertilizer at- tachment on the drill. The Kindred L on the check yielded 45 bushels per acre as compared to 48.6 where 100 pounds of 8-32-0 was added. The Traill check plot yielded 51.7 bush- els while the fertilized Traill yield- ed 50.5 bushels per acre. The increase in yield of 3.6 bush- e] per acre would hardly pay for the f>.rtilizer work, and investment in the fertilizer attachment, espe- cially at the present price of barley. A soil sample was sent to the NDAC Soils department to determine the amount of available phosphate in the field. The test showed the field as being high in phosphate, which in itself indicates the use of a phosphate fertilizer could very well prove to be unprofitable. The cropping history of the field indi- cated that nitrogen fertilizer would effect yield very Uttle, if any. On the Daley farm, the situation was different because the soil test indicated that the land was low to medium in available phosphate in- dicating the use of phosphate fertil- izer would pay. The cropping his- tory of the field also indicated that nitroeen fertilizer would boost the yields. Therefore. two fertilizers containing both nitrogen and phos- phate wss used. However, the nitro- gen rates were changed, but the phosphate application remained the same and both Kindred L and Trail1 barley were used, but on land Ch.t wsin flax in 1955. The check plot for Kindred yield- ed 18.3 bushels per acre with the plot where 100 pounds of 8-32-0 was used on Kindred the yield was 27.5 bu where 200 pounds of 15-15-0 was used the yield was 37. The Traill barley check plot yield: ed 16.66 with a yield of 28.66 where I00 pounds of 8.32-0 was used and 38.88 per acre where 200 pounds of 15-15-0 was applied. There is no nubt that the use of fertilizer on the Daley plots paAd off. From these trials you can see that there are a couple of important things that you should consider before before pur- chasing fertilizer. One. is have soil tested to find out how it rates in the mu,t of available phosphate, Sec- ond, be sure to review the chopping history which will serve as a very good guide when determining if nit- rogen fertilizer is needed or not, as well as the amount. By taking these two steps, the Tompson Brothers and Mr. Dsley s'-te you will be able to get a big- ger return on the money invested in f,rtUzer. at the Myron Hylden farm Thurs- day, October 4, according to County Agent Robert W. Amstrup. A complete sewerage and water system is being installed at the farm and the "plumberama" will give visitors an opportunity to view the various parts, not ordinarily seen. The public showing will be from9 a. m. to 5 p.m. Qualified personnel will be on hand to answer questions, Free coffee and doughnuts will be served throughout the day. Several busness firms are co- operating in sponsorship of the pro- ject. They include Melstad Electric, Edinburg, Johnson Store of Adams; Knutson Plumbing & Heating, Park River: Ramsey Construction, Park River; Nodak Rural Electric Co-op- erative. Grand Forks, the State and County Extension Service: Northern Plumbing. Grand Forks; Crane Co.. Baker Manufacturing and Shirley- Onstad. all of Fargo. The Hylden farm is located five and a half miles west and one and a fourth miles north and a quarter mile west of Park River. From Ed- inburg it is five and a half miles south and a quarter of a ile west. Clinic to Feature Uses of Concrete A clinic at which the use of con- crete will be featured will be heId for farmers in the farm shop at the Walsh County school Monday, Oct. 1, from 1 to 4 p.m. The clinic will be condcted by V. J. Meyers and H. V. MoLt of the Portland Cemetn Association in co- operation with Herbert Thiele, M. G. Lannoye and Howard Gordon, together with Arnold Stoekstad, of the vocational Ag department. All farmers in the area are invit- ed to attend the clinic and get first hand information on how to make good quality co crete and its use on the farm. " Farmers are urged to bring about 40 pounds of sand and gravel which they ordinarily use to make con- crete, These samples will be tsted for silt and organic content; screen tested to show gradation, slump test. ed to illustrate plasticity, batch mix. ed to show proportioning and yield and tested for air content. WHAT'S OING " Oct. 1: Community Homemaker club meets 8 p. m. at Joe Listopad home. Oct. 1: Harmony Homemaker club meets 8 p. m. at the home of Mrs. W. C. Skjerven, Secret Pals will he revealed. Oct. 4: Catholic Altar Society at 8. TOP MEDICAL ALLOWANCE First State Agency PARK RIVER, N. DAK. Phone 22801 t DIAL 36522 or 46341 INSURANCE.ABIE:NCY PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA -- AUTO - HOSPITAL Do you know that for over 37 yeats the  AGENCY has been the only Insurance Agency in the ty of Park River that makes its living solely from the selling of insurance. When you want insurance us for expert advice on all kinds oi coverages. FIRE - FARM LIABILITY ANNUITIES - SAVINGS PLAN WALSH COUNTY PRES!S ---- TIIIS ISSUE THIS ISSUE HAS WILL REACH PAGES 5,600 READEIW V0L. 73 PARK RIVER, WALSH COUNTY, N. D. THURSDAY, SEPT. 27, 1956 , NUMBER 32 operated Landsborough's cor- played in the savings bonds pro- 37 years, but his health gram in the county at a meeting of he feels that he must Commercial club at Fordville Mon- day evening. ! Business Man Bond Sales Aided Henning Gunhus CropsAssoc!ation l i By Volunteers Suggests Pr,ces Wa ace E Warner Day s From Store InaWalsh COU?otY Rites Set Friday For New Varieties ob " d S d ;ement in this issue of "ountysavings dsVol- Funera services wiilbeheldFri- During lastwinterandspringthe To Be serve atur ay announces that E. R. unteers were honored guests and re- day (tomorrow) for Henning Gun- Walsh County Crop Improvement will go out of the ceived Special Treasury Awards in hus, prominent Edinburg man. who Association distributed new grain business. He has owned recognition of the key roles each died Sept. 24, 1956, at St. Ansgar's varieties to several hundred Walsh Gordon Larson. Park River, Coun- ty Savings Bond Chairman. presid- ed at the meeting and Mr. Whitman of Fargo made the presentations "for the Treasury Department. In a brief talk, Mr. Whitman mentioned that the cash value of E and H savings bonds in Welsh county at present is 12z million dollars. He stressed the safety of t his bond, stating that if lost. stolen or destroyed, the govern- ment will replace it without any charge to the owner. All the newspapers in the county received awards. They are The Walsh County Record, Grafton, The Welsh County Press. Park River, The Tri-County Sun, Fordville and the Walsh County Times, Adams. Schools who qualified for the award were Grafton Public School, Forest River and Fordville. Larson received a silver medallion in recognition of his work as chair- man in aiding the county to exceed its assigned quota, which was $864,812. Total sales amounted to $952,343. Banks which reached their sales quota for 1955 were given awards. They were First State Bank. Park River: Bank of 'Minto: Citizens State Bank, Lankin and its station at Edinburg; The Walsh County State Bank, Grafton. and its sta- tions at Fordville, Forest River, St. Thomas and Hoople. P-TA Discusses Hot Lunch Program The executive committee of the Park River P-TA announced Mon- day evening that the elementary mchool's, hot lunch program would begin OCt. 15. Meeting in their first regular montthly session of the new School term, the parents and teach- ers heard President Mrs. Blair K. Chapman announce that no high school students would be provided for under this year's set-up. groceries and meat will be out. Some fixtures will be Landsborough says he does to leave Park River and disposition will be made of )re building is not definite, al- a transaction pertaining to Under consideration, he said. Ila.ks Announce Scholarships ' several years the banks in 1 County have given three $125 to young men from the that attend the eight week Short Course in Agriculture. Year they are offering the again; therefore, if you in applying for the please contace any of in Walsh County or the Agent for information and blanks. short course starts January ends March 2, 1957. Courses d include Farm Management, Selection, Rural Electri- Forage Crops, Farm Trac- tor Enjoyment, Horti- Crops, Livestock Health, and Games and Sports. applying for the must be (1) at least 1"/ age must have cornplet. (3) be in good health be living on farms and be in farming as a life work. to write, call, or visit your or County Agent for more e for Potato Entries Oct 1 entered hospital in Park River. He had beer. in poor health the past four months and had been hos- pitalized five weeks. Rev. S. O. Kvaale will officiate at the service which will be held at Trinity Lutheran church in Edin- burg at 2 o'clock. Burial will be in Trinity cemetery. The Jensen Funeral Home of Ed- inburg is in charge of arrangements. The body will lie in state at the Funeral Home on Thursday and un- til noon Friday. A resident of the Edinburg com- munity for 60 years, Mr. Gunhus had been active in community, civic and church affairs throughout his long residence there. He served as a member of the State legislature from 1916 to 1920. He was a member and an active worker in the Non- partisan League since it was organ- ized. A charter member of the Edin- burg Farmers Elevator Company, Mr. Gunhus served on the firm's first board of directors. He assisted in organizing the Edinburg and Tib- er Telephone Company. In addition, he was active in the Edinburg Com- munity club and in the Farmers Union. Born August 17. 1867 at Kenyon, in Goodhue County, Minnesota, Mr. Gunhus spent his early life in that area, coming to Tiber township near Edinburg in the spring of 1886. He married Anne Baker of Kenyon on June 22, 1893. The couple lived on the farm in Tiber township un- til 10 years ago when they moved to Edinburg. Mrs. Gunhus died in 1954. Survivors are a daughter, Mrs. Selina Bjorneby, a teacher in the Park River Grade School, a son, Ed- roy Gunhus, of Edinburg; a grand- daughter, Mrs. John Dusell, of Ath- erton, Calif., and a grandson Paul Bjorneby of Edinburg. There are also seven great grandchildren. Other survivors are two sisters and a brother at Kenyon Minn., and a brother, at Grand Forks. They in- clude Mrs. Etta Marcuson, Mrs. Os- car Sahl, Anton and George Gunhus, After considerable discussion as for Dakota to the methe of dispensing meal qu.n. to a a of 00rs0., LOcal Brlvers Win Wiliiam ]a! I, was rmml. Y.o mee withAhe school in charge of pears a wor OUt a atisfactory IIacln Ho n ors program lot both iituaents and fac- first two girls to be entered ulty. The biggest obstacle to last Park River drivers again took the were Judy Mater, 17, year's method, stated Mrs. Owen honorsat the stock car races Sunday sponsored by Johnson McGowan, grade school principal, in Grand Forks at the Fairgrounds. Park River; and Myrna was that the teachers had to sacri- 16, Northwood, sponsored Stephenson at North- to the rules of the con- girls must be 16 years of must be residents of and must be spon- a grower or shipper of Deadline for candidates the contest, said Mrs. Hall, 1. queen will be named at the the county fair and state to be held at Park 22 to Oct. 25. A long list prizes will be given to The prizes will be on booth at the fair each lice valuable class time in the morn- ings. With the increase in this year's enrollment, went on Mrs. McGowar4 such a procedure would not be advisable. Appointed to the three- man delegation were Blair Chap- man, Henry Kelly and Mrs, Peder Pederson. In other business the group heard Mrs. Chapman report on the area conference which was held in Grand Forks last Saturday. She told the members that arrangements were being made to hold a district meet- ing in Adams at a later date. The Park River assembly voted to ex- tend their assistance to Adams ,by sponsoring a coffee hour at that time. Before adjourning the parents and teachers hstened to Joe Kouba, pVCAS band instructor,-as he ex- ained a long-range band program for th grade school and the hign scnool. At present he stated, the high school band ]as only 24 mem- bers, yet are til]' sadly in need of instrumems, music and uniforms Contributions of any ...... + , ;11' undoubtedly b m Order he quip- ped, as soon a.q we get 'ora,ie, enough to find your houses . Wha't makes the future look brigh'ter, he pointed out, is the 64 new enrollees in the grades. For the next six months Kouba went on. there will be band classes at the grade school starting at 1 P. M. on Monday, Wed- nesday and Friday of each week. In conjunction with the appearance of the WCAS bandmaster. Les Ander- son, Grafton musm store owner, demonstrated various instruments and explained a rental program for beginning band members. FORGET-ME-NOT SALES SUCCESSFUL IN CITY The Forget-Me-Not sale in Park River last Saturday was very suc- cessful, according Mrs. Marvin Sorenson, chairman. She ated that 775 blue flowers..Tne Park River Decca club was m charge of sales. Mrs. Sorenson thanked the public for their wonderfm support. NO PRIZE TAKER THIS WEEK For the second week in a row, the winner of the Market Day prize did not qualify for the money. The name of Mrs. Victor Turner of Park River was announced over station KNOX at 3:39 p.m. yesterday, but she was not on hand to claim the prize of $125. Last week Harold Peo- ples was the winner, but w not here to get award. Next week me prize will be increased to $150. PARK RIVER GRAIN MARKET 5_.. No. 1 northern $2.06. durum, z.. ; Flax, $2.95; oats 56c; barley 75c-$1.00. Jerome Lund placed first in the main event, with Donovan Berger, second. Berger won first in the Aus- tralian pursuit race. Both young men received cash prizes. Allen Eide won first in the trophy race and in the main event had a mash-up that put him out of the competion. Plans are for several local drivers to go to Fargo Sunday for the stock car races there. Walsh County for Wallace E. War, Girls Officers the new officers of the Or- the Rainbow for Girls took an open formal in- ceremony was held. T. A. Meagher acted as in- officer for the event which in the Masonic Temple on day of last week. She was by Mrs. Elmer Argetsinger, Mrs. C. D. Lewis, recorder; Johnson, musician and Thiele, chaplain. is the new worthy ad- the Order; Jean Johnson, worthy advisor; Susan Charity; Carol Stull, of Gayle Dau, of Orr, Midgarden, record- Johnson, treasurer; Janice chaplain; Kathy Mater, Love: Carol Tur- ;ion; Kathy Thorleifson, irley Ramsey, Immortal- Morstad, Fidelity; Bon- of Orr, Confidential Oh- Patty Jurgens, Outer Oh- Brenda Neste, musician. mother, Mrs. Jake Mater, t her in office. . the meeting, luncn was Y members of the Eastern ,ghts it just don't pay to said Police Officer Henry cementing on the minor ;hat gued Park River morning. After officer made hs last culprits borke the west wall of service station, window and took residence of Mrs. Mar- and let the air out tires at various T authorities the matter. County farmers. These new varieties were distributed to the farmers with the understanding that the in- creases obtained in 1956 would be sold to neighboring farms at a reas- onable price. The prices that the of- ricers and directors of the crops as- sociation suggest are the maximum price per bushel for the various var- ieties, being as follows: Ransom Oats: Certified blue tag, $1.75 to $2.00: certified red tag. $1.50 to $1.75; certified yellow tag. $1.25 to $1.50; non certified, $1.00 to $1.25. Durum, Langdon, Yuma. certified blue tag, $3.50 to $4.00; Ramsey and Towner, certified red tag $3.25 to $3.50; certified yellow tag, $3.00 to $3.25; non-certified. $2.50 to $2.85. Durum: Verified No. 1, $3 to $3.25 (less than i% commonwheat) Veri- fied No. 2. $2.50 to $3.00 (Less than 3% common wheat). Traitl Barley: Certified blue tag: $2,10 to $2.50: certified red tag, $1.85 to $2.10: certified yellow tag, $1.60 to $1.85; non-certified. $1.40 to $1.60. Conley (ND-1) spring wheat is un- der contract and will be distributed to Waish County Farmers by the Crop Improvement Association. Far- mers wishing to obtain conley can sign up for it the evemng of Men- day,Nov. 5, when the annual meet- ing bf the County Crops Association will be held in the Park River City Hall. The price on Conley will be: Cer- tified, blue tag, rogued, $3.75 to $4; blue tag, not rouged, $3.50 to $3.75; certified red tag, $3.25 to $3.50; cer- chcked better than ever before. _ Durbqitv is built into the 1957 F'rd. through stronger alloy metMq, greater use of insulation and sounc- See ;Us For Short.Term, Low- Cost Accident Insurance Wallace E. Warner Give Results Of Fertilizer Tests Wallay and Tommy Thompson of Park River and Quinten Daley of Grafton report results on fertilizer trials conducted on barley. The trials were conducted in co- operation with the County and State Extensmn service and the Malting Barley Improvement Association of Milwaukee. Purpose of the trials was to de- termine what effect, if any, phos- phate and nitrogen fertilizers would have on yields and also if the fertil- tiffed yellow tag, $3.00 to $3.25; non- certified, $2.75 to $3. According to Harry Bergquist, of izer would effect the malting qual- Adami president; these prices are ity of the barley. the rrxtmum and it is possible.hat All that can be reported at this many farmers will have to sell some time is the effect on yields, however, of the increases for less as the sup- the results are important from the ply on some varieties is good and stand point of ordering fertilizer for will more than meet the demaRd, next year. Farmers having any questions on The trials on the Thompson farm the prices are requested to contactvre conducted on land summer fal- any the following officers or di-ed in 1955. Two varieties of bar- rectOrs or also the COunty Agent, Other officers of the association are: Henry Stoltman. Pale, Minn., vice president; Denis Monson, Edin- burg, secretary; Clarence Gaarder Park River. treasurer. Directors are: Alvin Shimek, Lan- kin. Dist. No. 1; Arnold Clements, Fairdale, District No. 2; Julian Gryde. Edinburg, District No. 3; Dean Miller, Fordville, District No. 4: Emil Paur Jr.. Pisek, District No. 5: Harold Bjorneby Hoople. District No. 6: Rolph Boone, Grafton, Dis- trict No. 7, Ralph Boone, Grafton; Ed G,|djates. Minto. Distrct No. 8: John Wysocki, Minto, District No. 9. New'57 Ford To Be SSown 00ere Oct. 3; Many Change00 Noted In Entire Oar hFOr the first time in its 53-year deadening materials, longer-wearing istory, Ford Motor Company will fabrics and plastics, and strength- produce two sizes of Ford cars, ac- ening of mechanical parts, according co:-dn to 1. S. Bateman, Park Riv- to Bateman. er Ford dealer. For the first time, a high perform- The new Ford line divides into ance V-8 engine is available as an two basic sizes, Fairlane and Cus- optional power plant on all Ford tom, plus the station wagon series, cars. The engine, called the Thun- each with its own body and chassis, derbird Special, develops 245 horse- In addition, the Fairlane series has power and is equipped with a four- been expanded to offer "Fairlane barrel low silhouette carburetor. 500" models, which have extra lux- Ford's new styling starts with ury features. The 19 new Fords wide hooded headlights and a for- which will be shown next Wednes- ward slanting grille and includes day morning will have the highest streamlined wheel openings, a wind- performance engines ever offered in shield that wraps urther around the low price field, Bateman said. the sides for better visibility, dis- The 1957 Fairlane and Fair]ane tinctive fins at the rear and con- 0 sedans are nine inches loner toured sides that gve the car a and four inches lower than last sculptured look. year's comparable models. Custom and Custom 300 sedans are more than three inches loner and nearly Former Resident three s'd on-balf inches lower than the 19. ,mod,1,. Station wagons aI . Dies in Fargo three and a half inches lower and nearly six inches Iortger. Marvin Sinjem, of Grand Forks, "There has been no serifice of formerly of Park Rver, died Sept. headroom insid the ear, In spite of 24, 1956, at the veterans nospital in the reduced height, the local dealer Fargo. He had been a patient there sad. The new frame extends to the the past six months. sides of the car and this permits the floor to be lowred inside the frame Mr, Sinjum operated a dry clean- ing business here in 1940. He was rails, i n .d tyling are nw born Sept. 15, 1911, at Brookings, S, The des g ,*. " - ' - D., but moved with his parents t o - ,. a oU,O . very dimen- zrom - r . Fosaton Minn. as a young boy. He sion is changed. Wheels, frame, rear marrie Dorofl'y Harthun there on .o arive shft, engines and every ........ .  - _ June 16, 1936. He served in World inch of sheet m .m m every ooy War II in New Guinea and the Phil- tim+ departures from style are de' ".- "- " pvst models. . eat" " h_l)ntil_i epmne. was hospitalized, Mr, Sin- Riding ease has been gr ly m- proved .by using a longer, wide- jurn had been employed by Gross- man's Dry Cleaning in Grand Forks. frame with lower pressure tires on SurvivOrs-are his wife, two sons, wider reads and em ying rede- Pfc-Dennis Sinjem, with the army signed ball-joint suspension m zron and outboard-mounted longer leaf m termany, and Douglas at home; mrirngss in bck. Bec,use there is a .ughter at home; two romers p in ahead of the rear axle, ana at sister, a Fosston. fro* rd dip on quick stoss 's Mr. nd Mrs. Bert Prke of St. Paul were here lst week to visit the former's parents, Mr. and Mrs: Alex Parke aud other relatives. PROTECTION FOR YOU AGAINST . Travel Accident . Gunshot Wounds . Other Accidents ner Day will be observed in various points throughout the county Satur- day, Sept. 29. A native of Edinburg, Warner ts Democratic candidate for governor. His present residence is at Wahpeton where he s engaged in the practice of law. Heading the committee for gener- al arrangeemnts is Mayor Lloyd Ev- erson of Grafton, assisted by Bill MoB, Don LaBonte, Robert Burke, also of Grafton. They extend an in- vitation to everyone, regardless of party affiliation to attend the var- ious events planned. The day-long program of activities will begin at Edinburg with a free breakfast served in the Community hall by Trinity Lutheran Ladies aid. The time is 9:00 to 10:30 a.m. and friends from Fairdale, Adams. Gar- dar. Hoop]e as well as Edinburg are expected to attend. Grafton will honor the Walsh county man at a smorgasbord from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m in the new arm- ory in that City. The meal will be free of charge. Assisting in the ob- servance will be residents of Au- burn. Cashel, Oakwood and Nash. Warner will speak from Grafton over radio station KILO, Grand, Forks. from 12:45 to I:00 P. IV[. Salurday. His talk will be non- political and will be in the nalure of a reetina to his friends and ac- quaintances in this area. From 3:00 to 4:00 P. M. Warner and his party will greet friends from Ardoch, Warsaw, Forest River, Voss. Veseleyville and Minto at a coffee hour in the Minto city hall. Concluding the day will be a ban- quet in the Park River City hall at 7 p. m. Tickets are $2.50 and may be obtained in Park River from Tim Vavrosky or at The Press office. A dance in the City hall with musi by Les Anderson's orchestra, will follow the banauet and will be the final event of the day. A souvenir booklet has been ptm- lished as a memento of the oecasi0n and it will be given out Saturday. Hylden Farm To Site of Plumberama tey were used, namely, Kindred L A, i .... and Traill with a plot Of eacl  A.& I iety planted wihout fertilizer for A new and uhsual dmonstration check purpoaes." One plot of each called a "plumberama" will be held variety was planted with 100 pounds of 8-32-0 applied with fertilizer at- tachment on the drill. The Kindred L on the check yielded 45 bushels per acre as compared to 48.6 where 100 pounds of 8-32-0 was added. The Traill check plot yielded 51.7 bush- els while the fertilized Traill yield- ed 50.5 bushels per acre. The increase in yield of 3.6 bush- e] per acre would hardly pay for the f>.rtilizer work, and investment in the fertilizer attachment, espe- cially at the present price of barley. A soil sample was sent to the NDAC Soils department to determine the amount of available phosphate in the field. The test showed the field as being high in phosphate, which in itself indicates the use of a phosphate fertilizer could very well prove to be unprofitable. The cropping history of the field indi- cated that nitrogen fertilizer would effect yield very Uttle, if any. On the Daley farm, the situation was different because the soil test indicated that the land was low to medium in available phosphate in- dicating the use of phosphate fertil- izer would pay. The cropping his- tory of the field also indicated that nitroeen fertilizer would boost the yields. Therefore. two fertilizers containing both nitrogen and phos- phate wss used. However, the nitro- gen rates were changed, but the phosphate application remained the same and both Kindred L and Trail1 barley were used, but on land Ch.t wsin flax in 1955. The check plot for Kindred yield- ed 18.3 bushels per acre with the plot where 100 pounds of 8-32-0 was used on Kindred the yield was 27.5 bu where 200 pounds of 15-15-0 was used the yield was 37. The Traill barley check plot yield: ed 16.66 with a yield of 28.66 where I00 pounds of 8.32-0 was used and 38.88 per acre where 200 pounds of 15-15-0 was applied. There is no nubt that the use of fertilizer on the Daley plots paAd off. From these trials you can see that there are a couple of important things that you should consider before before pur- chasing fertilizer. One. is have soil tested to find out how it rates in the mu,t of available phosphate, Sec- ond, be sure to review the chopping history which will serve as a very good guide when determining if nit- rogen fertilizer is needed or not, as well as the amount. By taking these two steps, the Tompson Brothers and Mr. Dsley s'-te you will be able to get a big- ger return on the money invested in f,rtUzer. at the Myron Hylden farm Thurs- day, October 4, according to County Agent Robert W. Amstrup. A complete sewerage and water system is being installed at the farm and the "plumberama" will give visitors an opportunity to view the various parts, not ordinarily seen. The public showing will be from9 a. m. to 5 p.m. Qualified personnel will be on hand to answer questions, Free coffee and doughnuts will be served throughout the day. Several busness firms are co- operating in sponsorship of the pro- ject. They include Melstad Electric, Edinburg, Johnson Store of Adams; Knutson Plumbing & Heating, Park River: Ramsey Construction, Park River; Nodak Rural Electric Co-op- erative. Grand Forks, the State and Coun ty Extension Service: Northern Plumbing. Grand Forks; Crane Co.. Baker Manufacturing and Shirley- Onstad. all of Fargo. The Hylden farm is located five and a half miles west and one and a fourth miles north and a quarter mile west of Park River. From Ed- inburg it is five and a half miles south and a quarter of a ile west. Clinic to Feature Uses of Concrete A clinic at which the use of con- crete will be featured will be heId for farmers in the farm shop at the Walsh County school Monday, Oct. 1, from 1 to 4 p.m. The clinic will be condcted by V. J. Meyers and H. V. MoLt of the Portland Cemetn Association in co- operation with Herbert Thiele, M. G. Lannoye and Howard Gordon, together with Arnold Stoekstad, of the vocational Ag department. All farmers in the area are invit- ed to attend the clinic and get first hand information on how to make good quality co crete and its use on the farm. " Farmers are urged to bring about 40 pounds of sand and gravel which they ordinarily use to make con- crete, These samples will be tsted for silt and organic content; screen tested to show gradation, slump test. ed to illustrate plasticity, batch mix. ed to show proportioning and yield and tested for air content. WHAT'S OING " Oct. 1: Community Homemaker club meets 8 p. m. at Joe Listopad home. Oct. 1: Harmony Homemaker club meets 8 p. m. at the home of Mrs. W. C. Skjerven, Secret Pals will he revealed. Oct. 4: Catholic Altar Society at 8. TOP MEDICAL ALLOWANCE First State Agency PARK RIVER, N. DAK. Phone 22801 t