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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
Lyft
September 23, 1954     Walsh County Press
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September 23, 1954
 

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PAGE TWO WALSH COUNTY  PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, Burdick Has H,S Say.. sarP'ar..O"c'a'Sv... "o.. [ MAILBA G l t B,v Usher L. Burdtck lion dollars. They were given only For Area Approved u. s. Congressman a few days to take care of their off- . . 1 airs -- in some cases less than ten This is the second ida series of Our Neighbor ih::evetr:t:ncagv  u::t'irs n. This is the first time in 16 years days. By reason of this order, pro- three articles on the rural telephone t that I have gone on a trip with any judice against these people was fur- program prepared by John G. Wal- One of the finest gems in writing Oftetn I was quite dismayed that he ters, coordinator for the Pola Mu- by an editor that has been my good didn't jmp into heated controver- Congressional party. These trips ther inflamed, and it became ira- tual Aid Corporation, which has fortune to read was one by the pub- sies as Hank and I are prone to do, are usually called "junkets". That is where the members go around headquarters at Grafton. lisher of the The Walsh County Re- hut he chose the better way. the world by land, sea and air to see what the conditions are in other countries- and then fail to see them when they get there. Some member of the party usually writes up a report that purposely does not disclose a thing except a large ex- pense account. In going to the West Coast with.. the Judiciary Committee I found it was not a junket, but one of the most necessary trips ever made by any Committee. When war was de- clared against the Imperial Empire of Japan, there were 110,000 people of Japanese origin here, many of whom were born in the United States and therefore citizens of the United States. No acts of disloyalty were or ever had been charged to any of these people, except in one case, where a trial was had and the defendant was acquitted. Nevertheless, the hatred of Japan stirred up by the attack on Pearl Harbor so aroused the people of this country that they were sus- picious of all people of Japanese origin, and the army general of the Pacific Coast area issued an order to round up all these people, re- gardless of whether or not they were citizens and take them away from their homes and confine them in the interior of the country. As later events showed, this probably was the most cruel order ever issu- ed in the name of the United States. Longfellow's "Evangeline" was no worse than the internment and eva- cuation of these 110,000 Japanese. For a great many years these people had inhabited California and were engaged in fruit, flower, veg- etable and oyster raising. At the time of their banishment they had investments in these businesses, in many cases to the extent of a rail- possible for them either to sell or rent their property. In some cases the people who would deal with them purchased or leased their pro- perty at only a fraction of what it was worth. They could not store some of their personal property which they did not want to part with, because no insurance could be obtained for this purpose by the warehouse men. In other cases they stored their personal belongings in their church buildings. On their return these storage places had been broken into and the property destroyed or van- dalized. To add insult to injury, in one county these ehurchs were tax- ed, because the authorities claimed these buildings were not churches but warehouses. The evacuees were compelled to pay this tax out of the small amount of cash which they took with them. On their return, the orchards, vineyards, oyster beds, flowers and plants had been so neglected that it was necessary, in large part, to re- plant them. The water system of irrigation had gone to rack and ruin, and this had to be replaced. In some eases trees that had re- quired 20 years to bring into pro- duction were found destroyed. Oys- ter beds had been dredged by un- known parties. There is no dispute, whatever, that this government made a ter- rible error in issuing that inhuman evacuation order, for these people, held behind wire fences four or five hundred miles from their property, could not protect themselves. This immense damage aceured as the proximate cause of this order of eviction made by the commanding general, It therefore becomes the duty of the government to recompense these people in their losses. HAVE YOU HEARD? By Lara S. Kristlauson Count Home Extension Agent One of the most popular requests coming my way where food is con- corned is recipes for desserts. Everyone wants something differ- ent and many people ask for re- cipes that are not too rich or too sweet. I tried just such a recipe re- cently. If you are one who wants a dessert that is a little different try the "No.Bake Cheese Cake." You will find it in the October issues of some of the farm and women's mag- azines. I'd be glad to send a copy of the recipe upon request. Speaking of magazines reminds me that this week's issue of LOOK magazine has an article about that Cornell kitchen I mentioned a few vwetheks ago. They call it the kitchen a college degree. It has a num- ber of excellent features that could be incorporated into remodeling plans or building. Thanks to Odrey Madland, Park River. one of our good 4-H'ers, for bringing the ar- ticle to my attention. Have you ever followed a recipe to the letter, done everything just exactly as the recipe required and still had a failure or poorer results than you expected? I suppose most of us will have to answer that in the positive unless our memory fails us. The cause of the failure may have been the measuring tools we used or the manner in which we measured the ingredients. Some will argue that grandmother didn'f need any exact measuring tools and she made the best pies or cakes in the country. That may be very true but how many of us could duplicate grandmother's cooking? She had an eye for determining just how much flour or sugar she needed for her cake. After we have used a recipe a number of times we may be able to make a good cake without accurate measurements too but I wouldn't advocate the practice. To insure the best results every time, try these suggestions as a guide to better bak- ing. Flour, except whole wheat and bran, should be measured once he- fore sifting, then spoon it lightly into measuring cup for dry ingred- ients. It should not be packed or tapped down. Level off with the edge of a knife or spatula, Brown sugar should be packed into the cup before measuring. Cups with no rim or lip are recommend- ed for measuring dry ingredients and fats. They should be filled to overflowing, then leveled off with a straight-edged spatula or knife. In measuring liquids, place the cup on a level surface and bring the eye in line with the liquid height instead of holding the cup at eye level and reading the measure- ment. Too often the cup is not held steady or straight. When using cups with pouring rim or lip, fill only to the 1.cup, l- pint, or 1,quart mark; do not fill to the top of such a measure and do not use such a cup for measuring dry ingredie!ta spoons and cups made be distorted by boil- temperatures,. tin or aluminum will not give accurate measurements if bent out of shape. Any that are bent or distorted should be replaced to to insure more accurate measure- menfs. Here's hoping all your baking will be t]hm belt yet: Mrs. Earl Berger, who is attend- ing school in Valley City spent the week end here with Mr. and Mrs. Ernie Berger. As was stated previously, an R. T. A. loan has been approved for the acquisition of 17 telephone ex- changes and for new construction in ten of these. R. T.A. does not lend 100 per cent of the funds that are required to construct or acquire an exchange. It does however, usually lend up to from 90 to 95 per cent. The exact percentage will vary with condi- tions existing in the exchange or exchange area itself. The balance of the capital must be subscribed by the owners Since Polar R. T. A. is a mutual aid corporation its owners are its member subscribers. The board of directors has established the equity rates for membership in the corpor- ation. Where an existing telephone ex- change is acquired by R T. A. sub- scriber ownership of equity i s strictly on a voluntary basis. All subscribers are urged to become members of the corporation by the purchase of membership equity, however this will have no bearing upon his receiving or not receiving telephone service. In areas where an acquired tele- phone exchange is not modern or in good condition, altho the pur- chase of equity by subscribers is not required for the continuation of the same kind of service, it would be a prerequisite to the securing of funds for the improvement and modernization of the system. A third situation would be where complete new construction is re- quired. In such areas the purchase of membership equity is required of a11 who wish to receive telephone service. The established equity rate for membership in the company is $50.- 00 in areas where the exchange has not converted to dial at the time of acquisition by Polar, and $35.00 in areas which already are receiving modern dial service. Meetings have been held in about half of these towns, and soon will be held in the others, for the pur- pose of aquainting the people with the program and the policies of R. T. A. Mr. and Mrs. Cyde Dibble, Clt; have received word that their son, Pfc. Everett Dibble, who has been been stationed in Korea. is on his way home. IIII LIJ LAND FOR SALE oft Lees' eofJ. .Murph ok( )idsl on land in Walsh County, If t the I rtheast quarter (SI/21 ='1/4), N;I half of the southeast quarter ), 5 tc. 1( Twp. 155, Rge. 59. bei  sol on competitive bids to the high- 0r: t los than one third cash, and the reci not xceeding 5 years. =  S. B. BAGNE, Guardian LAKOTA, NORTH DAKOTA I As guardian of the estate of J. W. Murphy, the under- signed will take bids upon described as: South half of the Northeast quarter (SI/2NE1/4), and the West half (WV2SEV4), Sac. 10, Twp. 155, Rge. 59. This land is being sold on competitive bids to the high- est bidder, for not less than one third cash, balance on credit not exceeding 5 years. i I FOR SALE FALL SPECIALS Clear Red Cedar Siding, x6 & x8. 100 sq. ft, $9.90 Utility Red Cedar Siding, good, x8. 100 sqt. ft $7.90 Windbreak Boards, Full I inch. Dry Pine Boards, Ix8, Dry Fir Shiplap, Utility, ix8 - Clean Out 2x6, 2x8, 2x10, Blanket Insulation Combination storm & screen doors, 100 sq. ft $7.90 100 sq. ft $7.50 1O0 sq. ft. $5.90 100 Bd. feet, $7.50 100 sq. ft $4.95 best grade - $16.95 "ALWAYS MORETOR YOUR MONEY" A. J. MILLER LUMBER CO. Brocket, N.D. Phone 20 cord entitled "My Son." It was a father writing of his son who had been killed in the service of his country on foreign soil. In like manner the editor of our Walsh County Press wrote a very beautiful tribute upon the death of her husband. Both articles were beautiful, partly because of the ability of the writers, but mostly because they were after all just simple forthright stories of ordinary every day events in the lives of the departed. I am not illusioned ot think that I can even remotely duplicate their efforts. They are writers by profes- sion and good ones. I am not. How- ever their written words have en- couraged me to at least try to ex- press or picture the place our de- parted friend and good neighbor, Arthur Trovatten held in the com- munity in which he spent his life. It seems that every person by his life and service to his fellow man carves for himself a niche which, lyon leaving it at life's end, will not exactly fit anyone else. Arthur had carved such a niche for himself, both deep and wide. By "commun- ity" I rneati much more than Ver- non township. Newspapers have al- ready related the story of his many positions of trust and responsibility which he ably and honorably filled, so I will not repeat. Being the same age and having lived almost within a stone's throw of each other (I don't recall that we ever threw any, but maybe we did that too when we were little) all our lives, we nnaturally knew each other intimately. So much so in fact that when we sent him our last Christmas greeting I signed it "From us at the foot of the hill" and they had no trouble knowing that we were the senders. Art and I started grade school to- gether and struggled through to completion well within the 16 years as prescribed by law. Merciful school records do not list each and every result ' of our efforts and sometimes non-efforts at lesson getting, but we always knew that the final test or exams then requir- ed a "best five out of seven" and they were not questions that could be answered by simply stating "true or false." No one among us gave more free- ly of his time to "attend community meetings called for the purpose of discussing or eozlsidering various problems or projec than did Arthur Trovatten. Uusually at such gather- ings he did not say a great deal. but his comments and viewpoints were eagerly awaited, especially by those Leaving here the outside activit- ies, we enter the farm home and there we see the greatest evidence of Art's unfaltering and untiring car that has made and kept order in all things. He liked machinery and understood its operation. Much of his was new and what wasn't new was kept in perfect working order. A most interesting and popular spot in the community was Art's work shop. Some ofthe tools were new. but many of them were old. al- though their usefulness had not diminished with the years. All of them were put back in their precise places and never left lying on the 6 6 ,Ok 6 ground where they were last usd. able was the coffee and A popular shop it was, indeed. It that emitted regularly was not al all uncommon for neigh- kitchen door. bors to go there with some repair Now he is gone and we l job. There are few men in the local- ity who have not at some time or other availed themselves of the hos- pitality of that shop. Reminiscing slightly I recall Walsh county's 50th anniversary celebration in Park River at which Vernon township went all out in der why. But, "must we things look for the how why and the Evangeline. David W, WALSH COUNTY building a float, second to none, in Harry OSrten, that never-to-be-forgotten parade. Most all the men of this community PubUnbed worked on the big project and, Press buileth Park Rive, needless to say, the base for our op- nnd entered in the Park erations was right in front of Art's ofe unde the Act of shop. I recall, too, anonther feature March 3, 1899 which made that location so agree-  in N. D., $3 s year Folks don't usually associ- ate the lure of gold with Custer's Last Stand, yet that precious mineral played an important part in the famous massacre. In 1874 the Blaek Hills gold strike brought throngs of eager prospectors to the Dakota ter- ritory, but they were blocked from the gold fields by the U. S. Army. The Army was detennhted to prevent the ia- vmlea oC hmd 0yen to the iadtam by mlemm tma. To avoid the troops, miners mesked into the Hills by seemingJy impossible routes and the area was soon dotted with white men avid for quick fortunes. Resentful over the white man's failure to keep his word, the Indians held war councils and the skirmishes began which culminated in the massacre of Custer and his men on the Little Big Horn. But it was a costly victory for the Indians because news of Custer's death brought quick troop reinforcements who stopped forever the upris- ings of the -#ndian aati@6s Publishe4 air a pubf/ service by the Dakotas Division UN|lrEo STATES BREWERS FOUNDATION. INC., Aberdebn, South D CO-OP CUSHION 6.70x15 $1 79* Pmsenger .... 1 CO-OP DELUXE CO.OP BAR LUG &OOx16 s14.. Posssnoer ..... COUNTRY SQUIRE 6.70x15 s16.. Passenger ..... 6.00x16 51375. Passenger ..... ALL PURPOSE 7.oox,00.00y. Truck ........ DELUXE RIB 6.SOxlG---6-ply. $ ) 1 SS*:* Truck ......... i= l CO-OP BAR LUG Truck... 6.00x16---6 ply .... $19.69 * Plus Tax and Trade-ln . . . other sizes also reduced *Plus Tax . . . Other sizes also reduced ALL HIGH QUALITY-EXTRA SERVICE TIRES CO-OP DOUBLE TIRE GUARANTEE LIFETIME* GUARANTEE All CO-OP ROAD HAZARD GUARANTEE . . . All tires are guaranteed for the life iof the CO-OP passenger and truck tires are tire against failure due fo def6cts in guaranteed against road hazard failures workmanship and maferial until tread is due to accidental damage from bruises worn smooth, cuts or blowouts. ASK ABOUT THE TRIPLE GUARANTEE ON CO-OP NYLON TIRES Farmers U[tfm Oil Co. DIAL 22731 PARK PAGE TWO WALSH COUNTY  PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, Burdick Has H,S Say.. sarP'ar..O"c'a'Sv... "o.. [ MAILBA G l t B,v Usher L. Burdtck lion dollars. They were given only For Area Approved u. s. Congressman a few days to take care of their off- . . 1 airs -- in some cases less than ten This is the second ida series of Our Neighbor ih::evetr:t:ncagv  u::t'irs n. This is the first time in 16 years days. By reason of this order, pro- three articles on the rural telephone t that I have gone on a trip with any judice against these people was fur- program prepared by John G. Wal- One of the finest gems in writing Oftetn I was quite dismayed that he ters, coordinator for the Pola Mu- by an editor that has been my good didn't jmp into heated controver- Congressional party. These trips ther inflamed, and it became ira- tual Aid Corporation, which has fortune to read was one by the pub- sies as Hank and I are prone to do, are usually called "junkets". That is where the members go around headquarters at Grafton. lisher of the The Walsh County Re- hut he chose the better way. the world by land, sea and air to see what the conditions are in other countries- and then fail to see them when they get there. Some member of the party usually writes up a report that purposely does not disclose a thing except a large ex- pense account. In going to the West Coast with.. the Judiciary Committee I found it was not a junket, but one of the most necessary trips ever made by any Committee. When war was de- clared against the Imperial Empire of Japan, there were 110,000 people of Japanese origin here, many of whom were born in the United States and therefore citizens of the United States. No acts of disloyalty were or ever had been charged to any of these people, except in one case, where a trial was had and the defendant was acquitted. Nevertheless, the hatred of Japan stirred up by the attack on Pearl Harbor so aroused the people of this country that they were sus- picious of all people of Japanese origin, and the army general of the Pacific Coast area issued an order to round up all these people, re- gardless of whether or not they were citizens and take them away from their homes and confine them in the interior of the country. As later events showed, this probably was the most cruel order ever issu- ed in the name of the United States. Longfellow's "Evangeline" was no worse than the internment and eva- cuation of these 110,000 Japanese. For a great many years these people had inhabited California and were engaged in fruit, flower, veg- etable and oyster raising. At the time of their banishment they had investments in these businesses, in many cases to the extent of a rail- possible for them either to sell or rent their property. In some cases the people who would deal with them purchased or leased their pro- perty at only a fraction of what it was worth. They could not store some of their personal property which they did not want to part with, because no insurance could be obtained for this purpose by the warehouse men. In other cases they stored their personal belongings in their church buildings. On their return these storage places had been broken into and the property destroyed or van- dalized. To add insult to injury, in one county these ehurchs were tax- ed, because the authorities claimed these buildings were not churches but warehouses. The evacuees were compelled to pay this tax out of the small amount of cash which they took with them. On their return, the orchards, vineyards, oyster beds, flowers and plants had been so neglected that it was necessary, in large part, to re- plant them. The water system of irrigation had gone to rack and ruin, and this had to be replaced. In some eases trees that had re- quired 20 years to bring into pro- duction were found destroyed. Oys- ter beds had been dredged by un- known parties. There is no dispute, whatever, that this government made a ter- rible error in issuing that inhuman evacuation order, for these people, held behind wire fences four or five hundred miles from their property, could not protect themselves. This immense damage aceured as the proximate cause of this order of eviction made by the commanding general, It therefore becomes the duty of the government to recompense these people in their losses. HAVE YOU HEARD? By Lara S. Kristlauson Count Home Extension Agent One of the most popular requests coming my way where food is con- corned is recipes for desserts. Everyone wants something differ- ent and many people ask for re- cipes that are not too rich or too sweet. I tried just such a recipe re- cently. If you are one who wants a dessert that is a little different try the "No.Bake Cheese Cake." You will find it in the October issues of some of the farm and women's mag- azines. I'd be glad to send a copy of the recipe upon request. Speaking of magazines reminds me that this week's issue of LOOK magazine has an article about that Cornell kitchen I mentioned a few vwetheks ago. They call it the kitchen a college degree. It has a num- ber of excellent features that could be incorporated into remodeling plans or building. Thanks to Odrey Madland, Park River. one of our good 4-H'ers, for bringing the ar- ticle to my attention. Have you ever followed a recipe to the letter, done everything just exactly as the recipe required and still had a failure or poorer results than you expected? I suppose most of us will have to answer that in the positive unless our memory fails us. The cause of the failure may have been the measuring tools we used or the manner in which we measured the ingredients. Some will argue that grandmother didn'f need any exact measuring tools and she made the best pies or cakes in the country. That may be very true but how many of us could duplicate grandmother's cooking? She had an eye for determining just how much flour or sugar she needed for her cake. After we have used a recipe a number of times we may be able to make a good cake without accurate measurements too but I wouldn't advocate the practice. To insure the best results every time, try these suggestions as a guide to better bak- ing. Flour, except whole wheat and bran, should be measured once he- fore sifting, then spoon it lightly into measuring cup for dry ingred- ients. It should not be packed or tapped down. Level off with the edge of a knife or spatula, Brown sugar should be packed into the cup before measuring. Cups with no rim or lip are recommend- ed for measuring dry ingredients and fats. They should be filled to overflowing, then leveled off with a straight-edged spatula or knife. In measuring liquids, place the cup on a level surface and bring the eye in line with the liquid height instead of holding the cup at eye level and reading the measure- ment. Too often the cup is not held steady or straight. When using cups with pouring rim or lip, fill only to the 1.cup, l- pint, or 1,quart mark; do not fill to the top of such a measure and do not use such a cup for measuring dry ingredie!ta spoons and cups made be distorted by boil- temperatures,. tin or aluminum will not give accurate measurements if bent out of shape. Any that are bent or distorted should be replaced to to insure more accurate measure- menfs. Here's hoping all your baking will be t]hm belt yet: Mrs. Earl Berger, who is attend- ing school in Valley City spent the week end here with Mr. and Mrs. Ernie Berger. As was stated previously, an R. T. A. loan has been approved for the acquisition of 17 telephone ex- changes and for new construction in ten of these. R. T.A. does not lend 100 per cent of the funds that are required to construct or acquire an exchange. It does however, usually lend up to from 90 to 95 per cent. The exact percentage will vary with condi- tions existing in the exchange or exchange area itself. The balance of the capital must be subscribed by the owners Since Polar R. T. A. is a mutual aid corporation its owners are its member subscribers. The board of directors has established the equity rates for membership in the corpor- ation. Where an existing telephone ex- change is acquired by R T. A. sub- scriber ownership of equity i s strictly on a voluntary basis. All subscribers are urged to become members of the corporation by the purchase of membership equity, however this will have no bearing upon his receiving or not receiving telephone service. In areas where an acquired tele- phone exchange is not modern or in good condition, altho the pur- chase of equity by subscribers is not required for the continuation of the same kind of service, it would be a prerequisite to the securing of funds for the improvement and modernization of the system. A third situation would be where complete new construction is re- quired. In such areas the purchase of membership equity is required of a11 who wish to receive telephone service. The established equity rate for membership in the company is $50.- 00 in areas where the exchange has not converted to dial at the time of acquisition by Polar, and $35.00 in areas which already are receiving modern dial service. Meetings have been held in about half of these towns, and soon will be held in the others, for the pur- pose of aquainting the people with the program and the policies of R. T. A. Mr. and Mrs. Cyde Dibble, Clt; have received word that their son, Pfc. Everett Dibble, who has been been stationed in Korea. is on his way home. IIII LIJ LAND FOR SALE oft Lees' eofJ. .Murph ok( )idsl on land in Walsh County, If t the I rtheast quarter (SI/21 ='1/4), N;I half of the southeast quarter ), 5 tc. 1( Twp. 155, Rge. 59. bei  sol on competitive bids to the high- 0r: t los than one third cash, and the reci not xceeding 5 years. =  S. B. BAGNE, Guardian LAKOTA, NORTH DAKOTA I As guardian of the estate of J. W. Murphy, the under- signed will take bids upon described as: South half of the Northeast quarter (SI/2NE1/4), and the West half (WV2SEV4), Sac. 10, Twp. 155, Rge. 59. This land is being sold on competitive bids to the high- est bidder, for not less than one third cash, balance on credit not exceeding 5 years. i I FOR SALE FALL SPECIALS Clear Red Cedar Siding, x6 & x8. 100 sq. ft, $9.90 Utility Red Cedar Siding, good, x8. 100 sqt. ft $7.90 Windbreak Boards, Full I inch. Dry Pine Boards, Ix8, Dry Fir Shiplap, Utility, ix8 - Clean Out 2x6, 2x8, 2x10, Blanket Insulation Combination storm & screen doors, 100 sq. ft $7.90 100 sq. ft $7.50 1O0 sq. ft. $5.90 100 Bd. feet, $7.50 100 sq. ft $4.95 best grade - $16.95 "ALWAYS MORETOR YOUR MONEY" A. J. MILLER LUMBER CO. Brocket, N.D. Phone 20 cord entitled "My Son." It was a father writing of his son who had been killed in the service of his country on foreign soil. In like manner the editor of our Walsh County Press wrote a very beautiful tribute upon the death of her husband. Both articles were beautiful, partly because of the ability of the writers, but mostly because they were after all just simple forthright stories of ordinary every day events in the lives of the departed. I am not illusioned ot think that I can even remotely duplicate their efforts. They are writers by profes- sion and good ones. I am not. How- ever their written words have en- couraged me to at least try to ex- press or picture the place our de- parted friend and good neighbor, Arthur Trovatten held in the com- munity in which he spent his life. It seems that every person by his life and service to his fellow man carves for himself a niche which, lyon leaving it at life's end, will not exactly fit anyone else. Arthur had carved such a niche for himself, both deep and wide. By "commun- ity" I rneati much more than Ver- non township. Newspapers have al- ready related the story of his many positions of trust and responsibility which he ably and honorably filled, so I will not repeat. Being the same age and having lived almost within a stone's throw of each other (I don't recall that we ever threw any, but maybe we did that too when we were little) all our lives, we nnaturally knew each other intimately. So much so in fact that when we sent him our last Christmas greeting I signed it "From us at the foot of the hill" and they had no trouble knowing that we were the senders. Art and I started grade school to- gether and struggled through to completion well within the 16 years as prescribed by law. Merciful school records do not list each and every result ' of our efforts and sometimes non-efforts at lesson getting, but we always knew that the final test or exams then requir- ed a "best five out of seven" and they were not questions that could be answered by simply stating "true or false." No one among us gave more free- ly of his time to "attend community meetings called for the purpose of discussing or eozlsidering various problems or projec than did Arthur Trovatten. Uusually at such gather- ings he did not say a great deal. but his comments and viewpoints were eagerly awaited, especially by those Leaving here the outside activit- ies, we enter the farm home and there we see the greatest evidence of Art's unfaltering and untiring car that has made and kept order in all things. He liked machinery and understood its operation. Much of his was new and what wasn't new was kept in perfect working order. A most interesting and popular spot in the community was Art's work shop. Some ofthe tools were new. but many of them were old. al- though their usefulness had not diminished with the years. All of them were put back in their precise places and never left lying on the 6 6 ,Ok 6 ground where they were last usd. able was the coffee and A popular shop it was, indeed. It that emitted regularly was not al all uncommon for neigh- kitchen door. bors to go there with some repair Now he is gone and we l job. There are few men in the local- ity who have not at some time or other availed themselves of the hos- pitality of that shop. Reminiscing slightly I recall Walsh county's 50th anniversary celebration in Park River at which Vernon township went all out in der why. But, "must we things look for the how why and the Evangeline. David W, WALSH COUNTY building a float, second to none, in Harry OSrten, that never-to-be-forgotten parade. Most all the men of this community PubUnbed worked on the big project and, Press buileth Park Rive, needless to say, the base for our op- nnd entered in the Park erations was right in front of Art's ofe unde the Act of shop. I recall, too, anonther feature March 3, 1899 which made that location so agree-  in N. D., $3 s year Folks don't usually associ- ate the lure of gold with Custer's Last Stand, yet that precious mineral played an important part in the famous massacre. In 1874 the Blaek Hills gold strike brought throngs of eager prospectors to the Dakota ter- ritory, but they were blocked from the gold fields by the U. S. Army. The Army was detennhted to prevent the ia- vmlea oC hmd 0yen to the iadtam by mlemm tma. To avoid the troops, miners mesked into the Hills by seemingJy impossible routes and the area was soon dotted with white men avid for quick fortunes. Resentful over the white man's failure to keep his word, the Indians held war councils and the skirmishes began which culminated in the massacre of Custer and his men on the Little Big Horn. But it was a costly victory for the Indians because news of Custer's death brought quick troop reinforcements who stopped forever the upris- ings of the -#ndian aati@6s Publishe4 air a pubf/ service by the Dakotas Division UN|lrEo STATES BREWERS FOUNDATION. INC., Aberdebn, South D CO-OP CUSHION 6.70x15 $1 79* Pmsenger .... 1 CO-OP DELUXE CO.OP BAR LUG &OOx16 s14.. Posssnoer ..... 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