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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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September 8, 1955     Walsh County Press
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September 8, 1955
 

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PAGE TWO WALH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH kIAKOTA THURSDAY, Sen. Young Promises To Introduce Legislation for 9urum Growers in '56 Senator Milton R. Young o North Dakota said he wilt definitely spon- sor legislation next year to extend the present durum wheat program whereby farmers are permitted to seed durum wheat over and above heir wheat quotas. Yodng spon- sored similar legislation last year and this year. for next year's program. It is ad- visable to obtain types of durum seed known to be of high quality." Young said he would introduce the new legislation immediately after Congress convenes next Janu- t ary. He said Secretary of Agricul- ture Benson favors a one-year ex- tension, and there is every indica- In a letter to A. J. Sandness, Ad-ttion that Senators who joined in ministrative Officer of the North co-sponsoring the legislation, as Dakota Agriculatural Stabilization welt as Congressmen from the Da- and Conservation Office, the Sen- kotas, Minnesota, and Montana. ator stated he intends to discuss and farm organizations serving the proposed durum legislation for 1956 area will again support the durum with as many farmers as possible, proposal. particularly those in the c,.r,00lMillion Barrel wheat triangle. He also stated he m would consult with farm organiza- tion leaders and members of Con- gress before determining whether Mark Hit In State or not an y limitation on durum wheat planting should be embodied in new legislation. Sandness h a d asked Young about the prospects of extending the present legislation. The Senator said in his letter that it may be advisable to place a limit- ation on the amount of durum whe,t that any one farmer can seed under next year's program. Limitation of possibly fifty acres ;&at any one farmer could seed over and above his wheat quota, he said, would tend to guard against overproduction of durum next year and give a badly needed break to small farmers. Young note that with some safe- guards in the new program, there would be little danger of producing a surplus of durum wheat next year. He stated the average production in the United States for the past ten years has been approximately 34 million bushels. The production in 1954 was only 5.5 million bushels, and the estimated production for 1955 is just a little over 14 million bushels For the most part, durum wheat yields, even of older varie- ties were quite satisfactory this year The newer varieties, too, have yielded very well. The Senator gave great credit to the North Dakota Experiment Sta- tion for the work it has done in developing the four new varieties of durum wheat '(After last year's harvest, they had only 238 bushels of the new variety, The reproduc- tion program in Arizona during the winter made available approximat- ely 8,000 bushels for seeding this spring. It is estimated that after the 55 harvest, there will be 100.000 bushels of these new durum varie- ties. It is difficult to realize that these four new varieties, totalling more than 100,000 bushels, were de- veloped from only four kernels in 1952, This is a remarkable achieve- ment by the State Experiment Station." The letter stated that it is reason- ably certain farmers next year will be permitted to seed at least fifty acres of durum wheat over and above their regular wheat quotas. Young noted that cash market prices of durum wheat are at a rther low level considering the great scarcity of durum wheat in the United States. "Every farmer planning to seed durum next year," he said. "should Oil Production Monthly oil production in North Dakota topped the million-barrel mark for the first time during July of this year, according to prelimi- nary figures compiled by the state eologists office. The 1.154,818-barrel total, as re- )orted o the State Industrial Com- mission, represents an increase of 300.{}00 barrels from production re- corded during June. The jump was caused primarily by a hike in the daily production allowable from 32480 barrels in June to 38.470 for' July, although the number of producing oil wells also increased from 536 to ,547. The daily allowable for this month is even higher--40,630 bar- relsand a new record is expected to be set. The next highest production to- tal was set last January when 995.- 612 barrels were produced. The low for the year to date was May, when 633.656 barrels were produced. Here are the county-by-county preliminary production figures for July, giving the county, the num- ber of producing wells and barrels produced. Billings, 13 wells and 22,985 bar- rels; McKenzie, 46 wells and 77,- 654 barrels; Williams. 345 wells and 74.654 barrels Mountrail. 109 wells and 228.346 barrels: Burke, 6 wells and 1862 barrels: Boineau, 27 wells and 39.937 barrels; Stark. 1 well and 791 barrels. Grafton Boy Hurt In Fall at Adams Arnold Lizakowski, nine year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Lizakow- ski, Grafton. is in a Grafton hospital suffering from undetermin- ed injuries as the result of au ac- cident at Adams Aug. 31. According to reports received here, the boy fell backwards into an outdoor privy in Adams striking his head heavily during a fall into a hole four to six feet deep. When discovered, he was unconscious and was given artificial respiration by Roy Schultz. Adams before being brought to St. Ansgars hospital in this city. He was taken to Grafton Friday. The father of the boy is a truck driver for the Grafton Milk Com- pany. DESK BLOTTERS, Blue, Green, Red and dark colors 20c each at STRICTLY BUSI NESS by McFoaffers "He's at that awkward age---old enough to retire but not old enough for Social Security!" Decca Club Takes Part in District Meet The Park River Decca Federated  Study club's scrapbook secnd I Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dougherty J won place in district competition Thurs- I spent the week end in Bemidji at day at the North Dakota Federation the home of Mrs. Dougherty's sis- of Women's clubs First district con- ter, Mrs. Leonard Poison. vention at St. Thomas. The six-member delegation from[ the Decca club at the convention sang in the districl; chorus. Repre- senting the club were Mrs. Paul Meberg, Mrs. Victor Saude, Mrs. Harvey Tallackson. Mrs. Gordon Greenwood. Mrs. Blair Chapman and Mrs. W. C. Skjerven. Mrs. Greenwood introduced the club presidents at the convention and re- viewed the years activities of the various clubs. For wedding invitations and nap- kins inquire at The Press. make every effort to secure his The Press. tf seed now while,prices are reason ............................................................. Ray Junkin Park River Dial 22411] able and while supplies are still available within the state." The ISenator warned that red durum wheat is ineligible for price sup- ports under this program. 'ihere is a strong possibility," he stated, "that such varieties as Golden Ball will be ineligible for price supports _ _ _ _ _ F You need... ENVELOPES LETTERHEADS 9r POTATO TAGS # STATEMENTS #r TICKETS AUCTION BILLS THEN-See us-. We specialize in fine printing at a reasonable price. See us for an estimate! Ask for Old Sunny Brook at Your favorite tavernl OLD SUNNY BROOK CO., DIV. OF NATIONAL DISTILLERS PRODUCTS CORP., LOUISVILLE, KY. - BOTH 86 PROOF KENTUCKY BLENDED WHISKEY CONTAINS 60% GBAII NEUTRAL SPIRITS. Walsh County Press J I I. HARVEST TIRE SALE Car, fnk, tractor, and ira. pien.at tires reduced for Ibml sole of the yeorl Park Rivm,. N. D. O-OP Co-op Special, 6.00x16--4.ply ............... S10.9S Go-op Cushion, 6.70x 16--4-p/y .............. 11.9S *Co-op Dlreotor Tubeless, Rayon, 6.70xlS--4-ply 19.9S Co-op Delu Rib, H. S. Truck, 6.00x16.--6-ply .. 11L4S Co-op All Purpose, H. S. Truck, 6.1K)xl6--6.ply .. Reef Tractor, 9x24--.4-ply .............. Co-op Front Tral', 4.00xlS--4-ply .......... 111i A  m  fm ml @ado-b Oke lm md b Abe Redme4-- Iddm a Dod a Your @4-4p Now and Save FARMERS UNION OIL CO. PAJI[  M.D. DIAL r/81 e____ m L ...... _ TRY A PRESS CLASSIFIED AD ,vLSH COUNTY PRESS Mrs. Harry O'Brien. Publisher ,"uLqJsned every Thursday from The Press building, Park River, N. D., md entered in the Par Ri" er post- office under the Act of Congress el March 3, 1879 2 50 in N. D., $3 a year elsewhere SPRING For high quality. pose spr'ng water. the stat licensed. oroved Kos Bros. Mineral contents well the limits the American Public Assocmtion *I, VISIT THE ; SILVER MOON CAF:E the next time you are in : * Fargo or Moorhead g*_  STEAKAND SEAFOOD  ARE OUR SPECIALTY Win. P. Kenney. Prop. 304 First Ave. SouEb. & Delivered by Oliver Desautel. Dial 32471 Almer BJerke, Phone 743 ,arl's Spring Water Grafton. Call K JOB BROS. SPRI Park River Dial Are You Bringing Your Son or Daughter To Fargo - Moorhead To Start School this Fall? If you are, we invite you to make the Powers your headquarters while you are in our Our comfortable hotel facilities and the attention of our courteous staff will make you "at home." And for real eating enjoyment, make the Coffee Shop your mealtime headquarters. You'll' the best of food, service and surroundings.., at erate prices. POWERS HOTEL - POWERS COFFEE SHOP Fargo, North Dakota Peoples Bakery of 6rafton GREETS YOU... WITH DALLY SPECIALS BREAD, dark or white 1 (Sliced or Unsliced) Valley Creamery MILK, Grade 'A' qt. 18c 2 ICE CREAM, all flavors WEDDING CAKE & PARTY ORDERS, A If you can't call for your wedding cake... deliver it personally by plane for a nominal Many customers tell us they save the price of their gasoline by coming to... Peoples Bakery Grafton, North Dakota " 0000ndus00rh| solvents manufactured from North 1)akota's 00emium ma!ting are used in anamaz mg variel'00l of proc00 the making of various inks. 00orth 1)akota farmers seeded more than three million acres of barley 1954, harvested a crop of 67,5G8,000 bushels. 70% 00his was premium bringing 48million tn added mc0me t00sfafe. Ig47 industrial users of increasingly faVored premium 00rl00...indudincj of the brc.j, purct brewing industry. PAGE TWO WALH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH kIAKOTA THURSDAY, Sen. Young Promises To Introduce Legislation for 9urum Growers in '56 Senator Milton R. Young o North Dakota said he wilt definitely spon- sor legislation next year to extend the present durum wheat program whereby farmers are permitted to seed durum wheat over and above heir wheat quotas. Yodng spon- sored similar legislation last year and this year. for next year's program. It is ad- visable to obtain types of durum seed known to be of high quality." Young said he would introduce the new legislation immediately after Congress convenes next Janu- t ary. He said Secretary of Agricul- ture Benson favors a one-year ex- tension, and there is every indica- In a letter to A. J. Sandness, Ad-ttion that Senators who joined in ministrative Officer of the North co-sponsoring the legislation, as Dakota Agriculatural Stabilization welt as Congressmen from the Da- and Conservation Office, the Sen- kotas, Minnesota, and Montana. ator stated he intends to discuss and farm organizations serving the proposed durum legislation for 1956 area will again support the durum with as many farmers as possible, proposal. particularly those in the c,.r,00lMillion Barrel wheat triangle. He also stated he m would consult with farm organiza- tion leaders and members of Con- gress before determining whether Mark Hit In State or not an y limitation on durum wheat planting should be embodied in new legislation. Sandness h a d asked Young about the prospects of extending the present legislation. The Senator said in his letter that it may be advisable to place a limit- ation on the amount of durum whe,t that any one farmer can seed under next year's program. Limitation of possibly fifty acres ;&at any one farmer could seed over and above his wheat quota, he said, would tend to guard against overproduction of durum next year and give a badly needed break to small farmers. Young note that with some safe- guards in the new program, there would be little danger of producing a surplus of durum wheat next year. He stated the average production in the United States for the past ten years has been approximately 34 million bushels. The production in 1954 was only 5.5 million bushels, and the estimated production for 1955 is just a little over 14 million bushels For the most part, durum wheat yields, even of older varie- ties were quite satisfactory this year The newer varieties, too, have yielded very well. The Senator gave great credit to the North Dakota Experiment Sta- tion for the work it has done in developing the four new varieties of durum wheat '(After last year's harvest, they had only 238 bushels of the new variety, The reproduc- tion program in Arizona during the winter made available approximat- ely 8,000 bushels for seeding this spring. It is estimated that after the 55 harvest, there will be 100.000 bushels of these new durum varie- ties. It is difficult to realize that these four new varieties, totalling more than 100,000 bushels, were de- veloped from only four kernels in 1952, This is a remarkable achieve- ment by the State Experiment Station." The letter stated that it is reason- ably certain farmers next year will be permitted to seed at least fifty acres of durum wheat over and above their regular wheat quotas. Young noted that cash market prices of durum wheat are at a rther low level considering the great scarcity of durum wheat in the United States. "Every farmer planning to seed durum next year," he said. "should Oil Production Monthly oil production in North Dakota topped the million-barrel mark for the first time during July of this year, according to prelimi- nary figures compiled by the state eologists office. The 1.154,818-barrel total, as re- )orted o the State Industrial Com- mission, represents an increase of 300.{}00 barrels from production re- corded during June. The jump was caused primarily by a hike in the daily production allowable from 32480 barrels in June to 38.470 for' July, although the number of producing oil wells also increased from 536 to ,547. The daily allowable for this month is even higher--40,630 bar- relsand a new record is expected to be set. The next highest production to- tal was set last January when 995.- 612 barrels were produced. The low for the year to date was May, when 633.656 barrels were produced. Here are the county-by-county preliminary production figures for July, giving the county, the num- ber of producing wells and barrels produced. Billings, 13 wells and 22,985 bar- rels; McKenzie, 46 wells and 77,- 654 barrels; Williams. 345 wells and 74.654 barrels Mountrail. 109 wells and 228.346 barrels: Burke, 6 wells and 1862 barrels: Boineau, 27 wells and 39.937 barrels; Stark. 1 well and 791 barrels. Grafton Boy Hurt In Fall at Adams Arnold Lizakowski, nine year old son of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Lizakow- ski, Grafton. is in a Grafton hospital suffering from undetermin- ed injuries as the result of au ac- cident at Adams Aug. 31. According to reports received here, the boy fell backwards into an outdoor privy in Adams striking his head heavily during a fall into a hole four to six feet deep. When discovered, he was unconscious and was given artificial respiration by Roy Schultz. Adams before being brought to St. Ansgars hospital in this city. He was taken to Grafton Friday. The father of the boy is a truck driver for the Grafton Milk Com- pany. DESK BLOTTERS, Blue, Green, Red and dark colors 20c each at STRICTLY BUSI NESS by McFoaffers "He's at that awkward age---old enough to retire but not old enough for Social Security!" Decca Club Takes Part in District Meet The Park River Decca Federated  Study club's scrapbook secnd I Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dougherty J won place in district competition Thurs- I spent the week end in Bemidji at day at the North Dakota Federation the home of Mrs. Dougherty's sis- of Women's clubs First district con- ter, Mrs. Leonard Poison. vention at St. Thomas. The six-member delegation from[ the Decca club at the convention sang in the districl; chorus. Repre- senting the club were Mrs. Paul Meberg, Mrs. Victor Saude, Mrs. Harvey Tallackson. Mrs. Gordon Greenwood. Mrs. Blair Chapman and Mrs. W. C. Skjerven. Mrs. Greenwood introduced the club presidents at the convention and re- viewed the years activities of the various clubs. For wedding invitations and nap- kins inquire at The Press. make every effort to secure his The Press. tf seed now while,prices are reason ............................................................. Ray Junkin Park River Dial 22411] able and while supplies are still available within the state." The ISenator warned that red durum wheat is ineligible for price sup- ports under this program. 'ihere is a strong possibility," he stated, "that such varieties as Golden Ball will be ineligible for price supports _ _ _ _ _ F You need... ENVELOPES LETTERHEADS 9r POTATO TAGS # STATEMENTS #r TICKETS AUCTION BILLS THEN-See us-. We specialize in fine printing at a reasonable price. See us for an estimate! Ask for Old Sunny Brook at Your favorite tavernl OLD SUNNY BROOK CO., DIV. OF NATIONAL DISTILLERS PRODUCTS CORP., LOUISVILLE, KY. - BOTH 86 PROOF KENTUCKY BLENDED WHISKEY CONTAINS 60% GBAII NEUTRAL SPIRITS. Walsh County Press J I I. HARVEST TIRE SALE Car, fnk, tractor, and ira. pien.at tires reduced for Ibml sole of the yeorl Park Rivm,. N. D. O-OP Co-op Special, 6.00x16--4.ply ............... S10.9S Go-op Cushion, 6.70x 16--4-p/y .............. 11.9S *Co-op Dlreotor Tubeless, Rayon, 6.70xlS--4-ply 19.9S Co-op Delu Rib, H. S. Truck, 6.00x16.--6-ply .. 11L4S Co-op All Purpose, H. S. Truck, 6.1K)xl6--6.ply .. Reef Tractor, 9x24--.4-ply .............. Co-op Front Tral', 4.00xlS--4-ply .......... 111i A  m  fm ml @ado-b Oke lm md b Abe Redme4-- Iddm a Dod a Your @4-4p Now and Save FARMERS UNION OIL CO. PAJI[  M.D. DIAL r/81 e____ m L ...... _ TRY A PRESS CLASSIFIED AD ,vLSH COUNTY PRESS Mrs. Harry O'Brien. Publisher ,"uLqJsned every Thursday from The Press building, Park River, N. D., md entered in the Par Ri" er post- office under the Act of Congress el March 3, 1879 2 50 in N. D., $3 a year elsewhere SPRING For high quality. pose spr'ng water. the stat licensed. oroved Kos Bros. Mineral contents well the limits the American Public Assocmtion *I, VISIT THE ; SILVER MOON CAF:E the next time you are in : * Fargo or Moorhead g*_  STEAKAND SEAFOOD  ARE OUR SPECIALTY Win. P. Kenney. Prop. 304 First Ave. SouEb. & Delivered by Oliver Desautel. Dial 32471 Almer BJerke, Phone 743 ,arl's Spring Water Grafton. Call K JOB BROS. SPRI Park River Dial Are You Bringing Your Son or Daughter To Fargo - Moorhead To Start School this Fall? If you are, we invite you to make the Powers your headquarters while you are in our Our comfortable hotel facilities and the attention of our courteous staff will make you "at home." And for real eating enjoyment, make the Coffee Shop your mealtime headquarters. You'll' the best of food, service and surroundings.., at erate prices. POWERS HOTEL - POWERS COFFEE SHOP Fargo, North Dakota Peoples Bakery of 6rafton GREETS YOU... WITH DALLY SPECIALS BREAD, dark or white 1 (Sliced or Unsliced) Valley Creamery MILK, Grade 'A' qt. 18c 2 ICE CREAM, all flavors WEDDING CAKE & PARTY ORDERS, A If you can't call for your wedding cake... deliver it personally by plane for a nominal Many customers tell us they save the price of their gasoline by coming to... Peoples Bakery Grafton, North Dakota " 0000ndus00rh| solvents manufactured from North 1)akota's 00emium ma!ting are used in anamaz mg variel'00l of proc00 the making of various inks. 00orth 1)akota farmers seeded more than three million acres of barley 1954, harvested a crop of 67,5G8,000 bushels. 70% 00his was premium bringing 48million tn added mc0me t00sfafe. Ig47 industrial users of increasingly faVored premium 00rl00...indudincj of the brc.j, purct brewing industry.