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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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August 30, 1956     Walsh County Press
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August 30, 1956
 

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PAGE EIGHT ! WALSH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, AUGUST 3 118 00HORT MRs. oTOPS., by 0'BR00'00 I ....... The two national political con- ntions are all over and people very likely haven't given a single hought to them for days. This be- :ig the case, of course they are en- tirely passe now as conversatior topics, That's the way it is wit $nost people who were long range .participants by way of radio or television, but for me, it is different. Having had the honor of attending the Democratic conclave in Chicago as a delegate and a representative of the party in North Dakota, I am very apt to be talking and writing about my big adventure of 1956 ad! infinitum. Consequently, I'll prob- ably become as tiresome as the peo- ple who want to tell about their op- eration or 'their children or grand- children at the drop of a hat. First of all, I want to thank all the people who wrote me while I was in Chicago and those who have con- tacted me about the Chicago doings since I came home. Little did I think that so many people from so many different places would be in- terested in me and my part in the "toVention. Some folks claimed they  spent hours watching the do- ing in the hope of catching sight of me on television. While some say they saw me and others did not, e tuth of the matter is, I came into range of the TV cameras at least three times. Perhaps it is be- cause I don't have television and have watched only one or two pro- grams in my life, that it didn't oc- cur  me that so many would be viewing the proceedings. If I had realized I'd have so many devoted fans, I'd have pulled a "Joe Smith" or used some other unusual means of attracting the camera man. Next ime I'll do it differently. e only catch is, there may never be a "next time," for me so far as being a delegate to a national poli- tical convention, Although this hon- or is intended to be given to those indivudals who have given long and valuable service to the party, it does not always work out that way. For instance, North Dakota's State Dem- ocratic chairman, Abner Larson, of Mandan, who literally eats and sleeps party politics all the time, attended this year's convention as a delegate for the first time. Like- CUCKLER wise Gov. Norman Brunsdale, ,'ho should be top man in Republican party affairs in North Dakota, had never been a delegate to the Re- publican national convention until this year. Since this is a reward for party effort, I was disappointed that Rilie R. Morgan of Grafton, was not chosen to represent Walsh county and the state at San Fran- cisco. Nobody that I know of has been a more loyal and devoted sup- porter of his party than Mr. Mor- gan. He has carried on and stood by his convictions in the face of many personal disappointments in people and events. He is a great admirer of President Eisenhower and would have enjoyed very much being there with his colleagues when the Presi- dent was the whole show. Comments of people concerning the convention have been varied and interesting. One fellow said he was sure the Dems would have no trouble this fall if the nominees had been Gov. Clements of Tennessee and Sen. Kennedy of Massachusetts in the No. 1 and No. 2 spots. He ad- mires both men very much and felt that together they would have been IT. Others are in doubt as to the ac- curacy of the tally in the voting for the vice presidental nominee. They claim things moved too fast and it could be the tellers got fouled up on the various vote switches. Conse- quently, they say Kennedy very probably was ahead, but didn't get credit for it. This I doubt. Several have commented on the unit rule by which so many delegations were bound. Most of them were against it and so am I, especially if I am on the short end of the rule. It 1 s in state conventions that delegates agree to this plan of voting, and in tha as in many other situations, it may seem like a good idea at the time. But, there can be cause to re- gret the action later on. It is some- i times a case of foresight being less discerning than hind sight. Another question tha has been asked is how come this big import- ant affair was held at the stockyards amphitheatre which is inconvenient- ly located, For those who have not visited that section of Chicago, i would suggest that standard equip- nose to keep out the vile odor that permeates the entire section for blocks in all directions. The reason this site is chosen each time is be- cause it is the largest auditorium in the city and its environs. Right now the City Dads of Chicago are in a hassle over the erection of a huge convention hall for the city, The money to pay for building the hall has been collected from private sources so the city will not have to pay for it. But the cost of maintain- ing it will be the city's obligation and that is where the hitch comes in because this, no doubt, will total up to a tidy sum each year. I look for the building to be put up sooner or later, however, for it is much need- ed, since Chicago is said to be the Convention City of the nation. At the risk of disillusioning some of the folks who had worked them- selves up a fever pitch over the bal- loting for the vice presidential nom- inee at the Democratic convention, I will say that I think it was a well staged show. The voting was the real McCoy, all right, but there is no question in my mind, but that the outcome had been decided be- fore hand. The National committee realized its debt to Kefauver and so did Mr. Stevenson, consequently, when the time was right and the voting was nearing its conclusion, the word was passed along to key people in enough delegations to tip the scales in the direction the big wheels wanted it, which happened to be in favor of Sen. Kefauver. Per- sonally, though, I have an idea that Sen. Kennedy is a comer and we will be hearing more and more both from and about him. I could be wrong on this vice presidential thing, of course, but the saying goes that any'thing is fair in love and war, so I suppose we may as well include politics and wrestling matches. R Local New00 Harold Dougherty went to Vatiey City Tuesday to attend a Standard Oil meeting. Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Hajiek and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Pengtlly visited at the William Tolson hcTme at Lakota last Wednesday. Mrs. Bernard Koch and daughs, Kate and Mollie, of Portland, Ore., are visiting here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dougherty. Sandra Monsebroten, six-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gust Mon- L sebroten of this city, was released I Aug. 23 from St. Luke's hospital, menf should be a clothespin for the i in Fargo where she was given treat- For The Week End Aug. 30 31 Sept. 1 DelMonte 46 oz can PtNEAPPLE JUICE 3 for 87 Magic Garden 46 oz. can TOMATO JUICE 3 for 87c Libby's -._ 303 can FRUIT COCKTAIL ............... 3 for 69c Libby's 303 can PEACHES ..................... 3 for 69c Del Monte No. 2 Can CRUSHED PINEAPPLE .......... 3 for 79c Libby's No. 2 can SLICED PINEAPPLE ............ 3 for 99c Joan of Arc 303 can RED KIDNEY BEANS 4 for 45c DEEP BROWN BEANS, Libby's ___ 4 cans 49c Libby's STRAINED BABY FOOD ...... 13 cans $1.00 JELLO, 10 flavors ............. 3 pkgs 25c Keel AID .................... 6 pkgs 23c DILL PICKLES, Gedney's ........ 2 qts 65c Assorted Qt. CARBONATED BEVERAGES ..... 2 for 45c WHITE BLOCK SALT Each $1.00 Bring Your Own JuR BULK WHITE VINffGAR ......... Gal. 39 WE BUY EGGS FRESH FROZEN FOOD CUT CORN, MIXED VEG.," GREEN PEAS, BROCCOLI CUTS, CHOPPED SPINACH, CAR- ROTS & PEAS .............. 6 pkgs $1.00 DewKist RED RASPBERRIES ........... 3 pkgs 81c CUT GREEN BEANS, BRUSSEL SPROUTS, WAX BEANS, CAULIFLOWER _ 5 pkgs $1.00 MEATS READY TO EAT PICNICS .......... Ib 39c SKINLESS WEINERS .............. lb. 35c GROUND BEEF ............... 3 Ibs $1.00 YORKSHIRE SUMMER SAUSAGE .... Ib 45c Fruits & Vegetables CELLO CARROTS ................ 2 for 25c LETTUCE .................... 2 heads 25c LEMONS ....................... 6 for 25c WASHINGTON PEACHES ...... Mkt. Price WE GIVE S & H MEATS Lck:K00s ment for polio. She is reported to have recovered from the attack which she had suffered four days earlier., Mrs. ,. D. Halberg and ons, Mark and Jrey left Tuesday by plane for their home in Park Forest, Ill. They had spent two weeks here at the home of Mrs. Halberg's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mike Magnuson and with other relatives. Mrs. Harry O'Brien has been in- vited to be the guest speaker at the noon luncheon meeting of the Graf- ton Kiwanis club on Sept. 5. She will give highlights of her exper- ience as a delegate to the national Democratic convention. Thirty-two women attended the dinner at Hillcrest Golf club Tues- day evening. Hostesses were Mrs. F. E. Weed and Mrs. Arthur Meagh- er. Prizes for golf and bridge went / to Mrs. Roy Neste and Mrs. C. E./ Lien Sr.. respectively. / Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Ronning oft Washbrun were week end guests] las week at the home of Mr and J Mrs. Walter Johnson in Park River. PARK RIVER MISSIOI Rev. E. V. Folden will speak at the Park River Mission next Sunday at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Also at the City hall in Adams at 3 p.m. C stsscareeymorelt  than you'd pay for|]  | the lowest-priced   washer on the market ! Low down payment Liberal trade-in $139.95 MAYTAG ,eve... forS Generatlonsl $189.95 trade- Malde & Sharpe Hdwe Park River, N. D. Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Staven went to Edmore Saturday to spend the day with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elling Knudson. House guests this week of Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon Gregoire are his brother and sister-in-laMr, and Mrs. Ervin Gregoire, oPoeatello, Idaho. Mrs. William Ferguson and fam- ily of Beltrami, Minn., spent last week here at the home of her par- ents, Mr, and Mrs. Elmer Staven. On Saay Mrs, Ferguson and children and Mrs. George Williams jr., spent the day with their sister, Mrs. Richard Casement and family, at Fordville. Mrs. P. J. Kenney, Mr.  Mrs. M. S. Bateman were guests at s barbecue picnic at the home of ]$" and Mrs. Robert Colwell SaadaY. HOSPITAL NEWS NOTES Births: August 25: boy to Mr. and Frank Hodny Pisek. August 26: boy to Mr. and Mrs. James EllingO Medical patients: Mark Allen Flaten and Oscar Gardor. Accident: Morgan Olson. Surgical: Charles Novak, La.; John Novak, Pisek and Emil lal" gard. Released:  Mrs. Hodny and babY, George Haas. FARM Bu;ldings INDUSTRIAL Bu;Icl;ngs COST 3. Fast delivery from your dealer's st0ck ]0 4. Better 10eking. $trght sides. Gable r. I |1-- -' You are free to chooseyour own siding oad II l Robertson Lumber Co. Dial 36601 Vernon Chally, Mgr. Park River IL.=. m = =,=-,=-- =,,,--,,.= USE OUR EASY PAYMENT PLANUP TO 3 YEARS TO PAl HARVEST TIRE SALE Director for Smooth riding, ease of control Tubes .... $16.75 Tubeless $19.46 6.70x15--4-ply plus tax and trade-in From Now Until October 1 Deluxe Cushion for Quality tires at low initial cost Tubes $13.900 Tubeless $15.900 6.70x15--4-ply plus tax and trade-in Deluxe Rib for High speed,-eavy load trucking 600x16 G-Ply ...... S17.45 8.25x20 IO-Ply .......... S58.78 Plus tax and trade-in Country Squire for Traction in mud, snow or ice Black or Sidewall Tubes $19J 0 White Sidewall Tubeless $27.40 6.70x15--4-ply plus tax and trade-in PARK RI Union Oil Co. Jake Mater, Mgr. DIAL 227JI PAGE EIGHT ! WALSH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, AUGUST 3 118 00HORT MRs. oTOPS., by 0'BR00'00 I ....... The two national political con- ntions are all over and people very likely haven't given a single hought to them for days. This be- :ig the case, of course they are en- tirely passe now as conversatior topics, That's the way it is wit $nost people who were long range .participants by way of radio or television, but for me, it is different. Having had the honor of attending the Democratic conclave in Chicago as a delegate and a representative of the party in North Dakota, I am very apt to be talking and writing about my big adventure of 1956 ad! infinitum. Consequently, I'll prob- ably become as tiresome as the peo- ple who want to tell about their op- eration or 'their children or grand- children at the drop of a hat. First of all, I want to thank all the people who wrote me while I was in Chicago and those who have con- tacted me about the Chicago doings since I came home. Little did I think that so many people from so many different places would be in- terested in me and my part in the "toVention. Some folks claimed they  spent hours watching the do- ing in the hope of catching sight of me on television. While some say they saw me and others did not, e tuth of the matter is, I came into range of the TV cameras at least three times. Perhaps it is be- cause I don't have television and have watched only one or two pro- grams in my life, that it didn't oc- cur  me that so many would be viewing the proceedings. If I had realized I'd have so many devoted fans, I'd have pulled a "Joe Smith" or used some other unusual means of attracting the camera man. Next ime I'll do it differently. e only catch is, there may never be a "next time," for me so far as being a delegate to a national poli- tical convention, Although this hon- or is intended to be given to those indivudals who have given long and valuable service to the party, it does not always work out that way. For instance, North Dakota's State Dem- ocratic chairman, Abner Larson, of Mandan, who literally eats and sleeps party politics all the time, attended this year's convention as a delegate for the first time. Like- CUCKLER wise Gov. Norman Brunsdale, ,'ho should be top man in Republican party affairs in North Dakota, had never been a delegate to the Re- publican national convention until this year. Since this is a reward for party effort, I was disappointed that Rilie R. Morgan of Grafton, was not chosen to represent Walsh county and the state at San Fran- cisco. Nobody that I know of has been a more loyal and devoted sup- porter of his party than Mr. Mor- gan. He has carried on and stood by his convictions in the face of many personal disappointments in people and events. He is a great admirer of President Eisenhower and would have enjoyed very much being there with his colleagues when the Presi- dent was the whole show. Comments of people concerning the convention have been varied and interesting. One fellow said he was sure the Dems would have no trouble this fall if the nominees had been Gov. Clements of Tennessee and Sen. Kennedy of Massachusetts in the No. 1 and No. 2 spots. He ad- mires both men very much and felt that together they would have been IT. Others are in doubt as to the ac- curacy of the tally in the voting for the vice presidental nominee. They claim things moved too fast and it could be the tellers got fouled up on the various vote switches. Conse- quently, they say Kennedy very probably was ahead, but didn't get credit for it. This I doubt. Several have commented on the unit rule by which so many delegations were bound. Most of them were against it and so am I, especially if I am on the short end of the rule. It 1 s in state conventions that delegates agree to this plan of voting, and in tha as in many other situations, it may seem like a good idea at the time. But, there can be cause to re- gret the action later on. It is some- i times a case of foresight being less discerning than hind sight. Another question tha has been asked is how come this big import- ant affair was held at the stockyards amphitheatre which is inconvenient- ly located, For those who have not visited that section of Chicago, i would suggest that standard equip- nose to keep out the vile odor that permeates the entire section for blocks in all directions. The reason this site is chosen each time is be- cause it is the largest auditorium in the city and its environs. Right now the City Dads of Chicago are in a hassle over the erection of a huge convention hall for the city, The money to pay for building the hall has been collected from private sources so the city will not have to pay for it. But the cost of maintain- ing it will be the city's obligation and that is where the hitch comes in because this, no doubt, will total up to a tidy sum each year. I look for the building to be put up sooner or later, however, for it is much need- ed, since Chicago is said to be the Convention City of the nation. At the risk of disillusioning some of the folks who had worked them- selves up a fever pitch over the bal- loting for the vice presidential nom- inee at the Democratic convention, I will say that I think it was a well staged show. The voting was the real McCoy, all right, but there is no question in my mind, but that the outcome had been decided be- fore hand. The National committee realized its debt to Kefauver and so did Mr. Stevenson, consequently, when the time was right and the voting was nearing its conclusion, the word was passed along to key people in enough delegations to tip the scales in the direction the big wheels wanted it, which happened to be in favor of Sen. Kefauver. Per- sonally, though, I have an idea that Sen. Kennedy is a comer and we will be hearing more and more both from and about him. I could be wrong on this vice presidential thing, of course, but the saying goes that any'thing is fair in love and war, so I suppose we may as well include politics and wrestling matches. R Local New00 Harold Dougherty went to Vatiey City Tuesday to attend a Standard Oil meeting. Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Hajiek and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Pengtlly visited at the William Tolson hcTme at Lakota last Wednesday. Mrs. Bernard Koch and daughs, Kate and Mollie, of Portland, Ore., are visiting here with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Harold Dougherty. Sandra Monsebroten, six-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Gust Mon- L sebroten of this city, was released I Aug. 23 from St. Luke's hospital, menf should be a clothespin for the i in Fargo where she was given treat- For The Week End Aug. 30 31 Sept. 1 DelMonte 46 oz can PtNEAPPLE JUICE 3 for 87 Magic Garden 46 oz. can TOMATO JUICE 3 for 87c Libby's -._ 303 can FRUIT COCKTAIL ............... 3 for 69c Libby's 303 can PEACHES ..................... 3 for 69c Del Monte No. 2 Can CRUSHED PINEAPPLE .......... 3 for 79c Libby's No. 2 can SLICED PINEAPPLE ............ 3 for 99c Joan of Arc 303 can RED KIDNEY BEANS 4 for 45c DEEP BROWN BEANS, Libby's ___ 4 cans 49c Libby's STRAINED BABY FOOD ...... 13 cans $1.00 JELLO, 10 flavors ............. 3 pkgs 25c Keel AID .................... 6 pkgs 23c DILL PICKLES, Gedney's ........ 2 qts 65c Assorted Qt. CARBONATED BEVERAGES ..... 2 for 45c WHITE BLOCK SALT Each $1.00 Bring Your Own JuR BULK WHITE VINffGAR ......... Gal. 39 WE BUY EGGS FRESH FROZEN FOOD CUT CORN, MIXED VEG.," GREEN PEAS, BROCCOLI CUTS, CHOPPED SPINACH, CAR- ROTS & PEAS .............. 6 pkgs $1.00 DewKist RED RASPBERRIES ........... 3 pkgs 81c CUT GREEN BEANS, BRUSSEL SPROUTS, WAX BEANS, CAULIFLOWER _ 5 pkgs $1.00 MEATS READY TO EAT PICNICS .......... Ib 39c SKINLESS WEINERS .............. lb. 35c GROUND BEEF ............... 3 Ibs $1.00 YORKSHIRE SUMMER SAUSAGE .... Ib 45c Fruits & Vegetables CELLO CARROTS ................ 2 for 25c LETTUCE .................... 2 heads 25c LEMONS ....................... 6 for 25c WASHINGTON PEACHES ...... Mkt. Price WE GIVE S & H MEATS Lck:K00s ment for polio. She is reported to have recovered from the attack which she had suffered four days earlier., Mrs. ,. D. Halberg and ons, Mark and Jrey left Tuesday by plane for their home in Park Forest, Ill. They had spent two weeks here at the home of Mrs. Halberg's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Mike Magnuson and with other relatives. Mrs. Harry O'Brien has been in- vited to be the guest speaker at the noon luncheon meeting of the Graf- ton Kiwanis club on Sept. 5. She will give highlights of her exper- ience as a delegate to the national Democratic convention. Thirty-two women attended the dinner at Hillcrest Golf club Tues- day evening. Hostesses were Mrs. F. E. Weed and Mrs. Arthur Meagh- er. Prizes for golf and bridge went / to Mrs. Roy Neste and Mrs. C. E./ Lien Sr.. respectively. / Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Ronning oft Washbrun were week end guests] las week at the home of Mr and J Mrs. Walter Johnson in Park River. PARK RIVER MISSIOI Rev. E. V. Folden will speak at the Park River Mission next Sunday at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Also at the City hall in Adams at 3 p.m. C stsscareeymorelt  than you'd pay for|]  | the lowest-priced   washer on the market ! Low down payment Liberal trade-in $139.95 MAYTAG ,eve... forS Generatlonsl $189.95 trade- Malde & Sharpe Hdwe Park River, N. D. Mr. and Mrs. Elmer Staven went to Edmore Saturday to spend the day with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Elling Knudson. House guests this week of Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon Gregoire are his brother and sister-in-laMr, and Mrs. Ervin Gregoire, oPoeatello, Idaho. Mrs. William Ferguson and fam- ily of Beltrami, Minn., spent last week here at the home of her par- ents, Mr, and Mrs. Elmer Staven. On Saay Mrs, Ferguson and children and Mrs. George Williams jr., spent the day with their sister, Mrs. Richard Casement and family, at Fordville. Mrs. P. J. Kenney, Mr.  Mrs. M. S. Bateman were guests at s barbecue picnic at the home of ]$" and Mrs. Robert Colwell SaadaY. HOSPITAL NEWS NOTES Births: August 25: boy to Mr. and Frank Hodny Pisek. August 26: boy to Mr. and Mrs. James EllingO Medical patients: Mark Allen Flaten and Oscar Gardor. Accident: Morgan Olson. Surgical: Charles Novak, La.; John Novak, Pisek and Emil lal" gard. Released:  Mrs. Hodny and babY, George Haas. FARM Bu;ldings INDUSTRIAL Bu;Icl;ngs COST 3. Fast delivery from your dealer's st0ck ]0 4. Better 10eking. $trght sides. Gable r. I |1-- -' You are free to chooseyour own siding oad II l Robertson Lumber Co. Dial 36601 Vernon Chally, Mgr. Park River IL.=. m = =,=-,=-- =,,,--,,.= USE OUR EASY PAYMENT PLANUP TO 3 YEARS TO PAl HARVEST TIRE SALE Director for Smooth riding, ease of control Tubes .... $16.75 Tubeless $19.46 6.70x15--4-ply plus tax and trade-in From Now Until October 1 Deluxe Cushion for Quality tires at low initial cost Tubes $13.900 Tubeless $15.900 6.70x15--4-ply plus tax and trade-in Deluxe Rib for High speed,-eavy load trucking 600x16 G-Ply ...... S17.45 8.25x20 IO-Ply .......... S58.78 Plus tax and trade-in Country Squire for Traction in mud, snow or ice Black or Sidewall Tubes $19J 0 White Sidewall Tubeless $27.40 6.70x15--4-ply plus tax and trade-in PARK RI Union Oil Co. Jake Mater, Mgr. DIAL 227JI