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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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August 30, 1956     Walsh County Press
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August 30, 1956
 

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PAG TWO WALSH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA elly&apos;s ................ lO  w. _e,  rner ._ ............. . Politeness usually pays off, always say. You may be a diamond in the rough and extremely valu- able. but if you don't mind your manners people are just as liable as not to think you're a very small pebble and heave you out on your ear. So I think it is the duty of young boys and girls just starting out in life, to learn to be polite, and not go around kicking stray dogs and sticking pins in little babies. My own manners are kinds av- erage. I mean, I wouldn't kick a dog unless he got in my way, and especially if he wuz a real big hungry-looking brute like some of the ones I sneak past up in my neighborhood. I hardly ever eat peas with a knife, mostly because they always roll off and are very hard to spot on our checkered tile floor. And since I've gotten married I hardly ever yell down to the far end of the table "Shoot the spuds up!" But even so, may- be I could stand a little jackin '= up in the manners' department. Any- how, when I got this letter in the mail about a month ago from a company advertising a book on etiquette, my sales resistance was pretty low and I kept right on reading. Especially since they had been reading their own book and were real polite about it; suggest- ing in a nice way of course, that maybe if I wasn't as I wanted to be, it was because I made a fox- pass occasionally. Like using other people's toothbrushes, laughing in a loud and boorish manner at holes in folk's clothing, or flicking my cigarette ashes in my neighbors's pants cuff. and so forth• hwk So I signed the card and in a few days along came the book. It was a very nice book, I think, but about that time my aunt Rosamond took off for the Democratic convention in Chicago and there was more action around here than Marilyn Monroe walking up a very long staircase. Most of my spare time was spent kicking the linotype and saying mean things to a big ugly- looking newspaper press. Anyhow, I didn't get a chance to look at the book and see if I wanted to send it back or not. My experience has been in the past though, that no matter how fast you shoot it back to them companies, 'the ten.day trial period just expired" and ya wind up keeping the whatchama- callit. Well. pretty soon I got a statement from the publishers and they wanted I should send them $5.09 for the book. But by that time one of my kids had busted a front window in the house, a neighbor's dog had swallowed my last $10 bill, and the missus read about a big sale on peanut butter at a local grocery store, so you can see I had a lotta things on my mind. A little later another bill came, but I was so darn busy fixing windows, fol- lowing that dog around, and car- fling home peanut butter for the ittle woman that I didn't have any e  monkey around with un- important things like paying for books on etiquette. hwk Well, things went on like that for awhile, and letters and bills were coming thick and fast. It got to be such a doggone nuisance that finally I read one of them, and ya know it made me kind of half sore at 'era, because they were starting to tell me all the things that would happen to me if I didn't settle up pronto with $5.09. About that time my aunt Rosamond came back and she let me see her expense account. Right then I felt a little ashamed and figured I had no excuse for not paying for the book. So I did. hwk But I guess the publishers had got so in the habit of writing that they couldn't stop, and by that e they had invited in a collect- ion agency to help take care of their correspondence. This agency has a name so long that I ain't even gomaa' bother you with it, but it was founded to preserve stabil- ity, arre abtmes, and aid in pun- ishments of violations. It said so right on the letterhead. The letter said they'd ive me exactly I0 days to square up for that book, and that I didn have to bother sending the book back ither, because it wouldn't do me arty good. They went on to say that ! needn't try and tell them I wu laeoke, out of work or ill. They Mmp . " t"'- waa ..... to collect tha o uu Come .... " xlll O! high wafer, (that s whatthey said and I better send it air mail, spec telegram. I ten tal delivery or Ym I was sick, but what really macL me sad, wuz to see that • arned Duffy, nO Murphy--well ar hman anyway, had written tl ultimatum. hwk Well, right off the bat I could see' this situation called for a soft the gendarmes It was serious! Pol- ,,vat called for--and quick as a schoolgirl's blush, I savvied just what to do• I'd check that et- iquette book and find out how to write Mr. Casey, no Mr. Murphy, for surely a book that cost $5.09 I ought to tell what to do in such an emergency. It had to be polite, but not servile if you know what I mean. Dignified. yet friendly, with a touch of mild sorrow that I should be so misunderstood, and yet firm. So I wrote• hwk But to make a long story short, I got a letter yesterday from my pen pal Hogan, er Murphy telling me that his company had received my August 14th letter and that its contents had wiped away all mis- understandings. Well I sure felt awful good about that and was really grateful to old chapter 12 for geiting me out of that jam. But after a few seconds a suspicious thought flitted through my mind. and sure enuff, the gouldurn letter that Dooley, no Murphy was so pleased to get was my check for $5.09. Not the, gentlemanly letter that I had written them. Apparently that publishing outfit is nothing but downright plain hypocrites, for what they was interested in. wasn't my good manners but the money I've earned during the years I've lived as a normal slob. Well, its too late to do anything now and about the only thing that etiquette book can be used for is to park the youngest kid on at the dinner table. As for me. I'm gonna' start eating my peas with a knife again, only I'll fool that Murphyrll mix 'em with mashed potatoes so I don't have to be picking them out of my shirt pockets or pants cuffs. hwk This column so far has never spouted poetry mostly because the writer is probably the poorest judge of poetry living. On one oc- casion I bravely ventured the opinion that Robert W. Service was my favorite poet and "The Shoot- ing of Dan McGrew" my favorite poem. All present smiled sadly, shook their heads gently and eyed me pityingly. I never felt more out- of-place in my life. unless it was the time somebody forgot to lock the door on a steam room in the Minneapolis YWCA. But when some humorous person, with ob- vious good taste, stuck this on my spindle while I was having coffee Monday morning, I figured that it was too good to get thrown away by some uneducated water drinker. hwk Th horse and mule live 30 years And nothing know of wine & beers. The goat and sheep at 20 die And never taste of Scotch or Rye. The cow drinks water by the ton And at 18 is mostly done. The dog at 15 cashes in Without' the aid of rum or gin. The cat in milk and water =oaks And then at 12 it always croaks. The modest, sober, drybone hen Lays eggs for us, then dies at 10. All animals are strictly dry The sinless live and swiftly die; But sinful, ginful, rum-soaked men Survive for three score years & 10. And some of us, the mighty few, Keep drinking 'till we're 92. hwk The Last Word . . . ru bet you'd be surprised if I listed names of guys asking me in sort of a nonchalant way if I hap- pened to have the magazine with the picture of the nudist wedding (mentioned last week) handy, To protect myself from pomible injury I'll keep my yap shut. Light-Weight Aluminum POTATO CONVEYORS THESE WOMEN! M 1 Ii m love--I mean t real, enduring, eternal kind d love--for two weeks during vacalionl" Your Home and You The Walsh County Press Mrs. Harry O'Brien /-, Editor & Publisher Published every Thursday from The Press building, Park PAver, I ltlt Bakota, and entered in the Park River postoffice under the Act of C0" gress of March 3, 1879. Subscription rates, $2.50 a year in North Dak0t $3 a year elsewhere. Editorially Speaking.... Already it seems quite clear that the 1956 Republican campaign will center around "peace and prosperity" and as the threat of war in tl trouble spots of the world increases. GOP speakers will really Ir down on the "prosperity" theme. Right now. the Republican orators are pointing to our coUtrY' economm gains in 1955, comoared with the recession year of 1954. t this oversimplified political argument merely serves to mask the trat about the GOP prosperity. The vital facts that the Republican mott pieces will not bring to the public are: "k The average rate of growth of the economy under the Republi is less than half what it was under the Democrats. The number of new businesses springing up each year is only a eighth as large under the Republican "prosperity" as it was under tic Dems. $ The rate of business failures under the so-called "GOP prosP erit is twice what it was under the Democrats. , Prosperity under the Republicans has been concentrated largeM 0. the giant corporations while other segments of the economy have 1 far behind. By Joyce L. Fritzler. Home Extension Agen Republican Before we know it, the summer phases of homemaking and or agri- speeches about "prosperity" slur over such _ will be over and it will be time to culture may organize a 4-H club. I problems as the farm slump, rising consumer debt, chronically deprT make plans to have the children They must have one or more adult areas, and a hidden inflation, all of which threaten the future healtlt ready to go back to school. The up- leaders before they organize. It is the economy. roach of fall also means that many organizations take up their pro- gram of activities after a quiet or inactive summer, families return from vacations and settle down to work again and preparations for fall activities begins. Among the organizations begin- ning a new year in the fall are the 4-H and Homemaker clubs. Their club year begins October 1. For anyone who is interested in joining or organizing a 4-H or Homemaker cluh in your community there are only a few requirements necessary to organize a club. To organize a Homemakers club gather together ten or more women who are interested in studying and receiving practical and recent in- formation on phases of homemaking. Contact your Home Extension Agent who will explain' club work and help organize the group. Homemaker club members must be willing to share the responsibil- ity of holding an office in their also important that the parents support their club work as the pro- jects will require their help and co- operation. In addition to the project work, club members receive many other opportunities belonging to a 4-H club. They have a chance to work and play with other boys and girls of their age. Members have the op- portunity to participate in County 4-H events such as camp, achieve- ment day, demonstration and judg- ing contest, 4-H talent program and other events. Older members with good club records are awarded many state and national trips and other awards• If there are parents, young peo- ple and leaders who are interested in organizing a 4-H club contact the county or Home Agent and arrange for the first meeting. Now is the time to organize a 4-H club. GRAFTON COUPLE WED club and to attend training meetings Announcement has been made of where they will study a phase of I the marriage of Mrs. Clara Munroe the project assigned them. They[and Dr. C. 1t. Tompkins, both of will then present this lesson to their  Grafton. The ceremony took place club members at a local club meet- ] Aug• 20 at the home of Dr. Tomp- ing. Homemaker clubs may be organ- ized any time of the year but the fall is best so that members may at- tend all the training meetings to receive their lessons. 4-H clubs may be organized any time from Oct. 1 to May 1. Members must be between the ages of nine and twenty• A club member must reach the age of 10 before June 1 of the club year she or he joins• A group of about eight or more boys or girls interested in studying kin's son and daughter-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. W. A. Tompkins at Elm- hurst, Ill. Dr. and Mrs. Tompkins will be at home in Grafton after Sept. 15. TO HEAD FORDVILLE BANK Dan Bartholomew of St. Thomas, has been named manager of the Fordville branch of the Walsh County State "bank of Grafton. He succeeds E. J. Beetz, who has resigne d to devote his time to the insurance business. ! =_ .= .= l ! we handle ! nnn !UmMNIII | 14-in Belt Conveyors i Complete With TAKE THE FAM|LY TO THE Built-in Motor STOC K CAR RACES /4 HP on 12 ft. to 16˝ ft, m, on s ft. ,o 24 t. YOU can easily hve us hanclle youe m_ Weight Price CCC loan for you. Just be su to speci m 12 ft---297 Ibs ........ $590.00 | River. 134 ft.--313 Ibs ...... $820.00 this bank aS your agent whl you apPlY Park Speedway z5 ft--329 Ibe ......... $60.00 for your loam Weql advma the money m. ....... : Sun Sept 2 Mon Sept $ 18 1 lbs ........ $750.00 to yOU as soon aS you reoeive your CCC  • • • I 19˝ ft--77 Ibs ...... $780.00 22421 ft--393ft_4091bSlbs ........ ..... _$840.005810"00 , county committee's approval Bring STARTS 2:30 P. M.  24 tt--425 lbs ........ $870.00 your approved papers with you--.we'll need them in completing your loan. SlO z0 DAYS DOOR PRiZŁ Required for Delivery m MEAGHER FHIST STATE BANK | . " Additional drivers and cars from Canada and PARK RIVER, N. D. DIAL 22801 ! sots will be here next Sunday. ,,  ,mm.m  i i Refrubment, Served on the Grounds iim ==;m;mlmmnmgmmmmmnmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm " The key to continued prosperity, it has been pointed out, depen a sound increase in the quantity of goods produced each year W itl#lt this steady increase, the economy can not keep up with th; natiO' growing population and its expanding needs• However in the hhr# i::rs;f:he Eisenhower Administration, the average increase in p rO; ' g cls and services has been about 3 per cent--less than half  it was under the Democrats. This reduced rate of growth, if allowed continue, can have serious consequences, for economists agree that $ ] per cent growth is not enough to match the country's mounting need Part of the slippage can be traced to the laree number of the b" nesses which have failed since the Eisenhower " Nixon Administrsti# took office. Figures compiled by the financial re ortin " e Dtt $ p _ servlc , radstreet. show that while the number of business failures in 1947 " only 3,474, there were 11,000 in 1954, and at least that many in the  called "boom" year of 1955. The failure rate has doubled between last 10 Democratic years and the first three Republican years A cor, account of GOP business failures must include no only those  folded uu, but those which were never born One of the clearest sig the real strength of the economy during the Truman Administration . the fact that more than 50,000 bmdneekes were started each year. I/l Ike• the number has dropped to an average of about 6,500"a  year. The situation has grown so serious, in fact that the Commerce I..l ment has issued the somber finding that a business starting up no-- about a 50-50 chance of lasting two years and that four out of five ' die within 10 years. Republican speechmakers, in painting their glowing picture of t, perity, will also avoid mentioning that the economic gains have heavily weighted in favor of the big business segment of our econOl.  Since 1952, the 'take-home pay" (profits after taxes) of eorpOrati˘. has risen 36 per cent, @hile the average person's take-home pay has C up only nine per cent. And in the same period, while farm income ed 27 per cent, the income of corporation ,stockholders rose hY sw that amount• In fact, in the last half of 1955, corporation sharehOl__ received more income from dividends than all of the farmers in I country received from faming. This lopsided prosperity zs no economic alt of ..... " quirk. It is the re !. conscious Administration policies which put the interests of big b O# ahead of the interest of small business, farmers and workin - people, the theory that sooner or later, big business nroe tvwi]]n v " v "]] triekl" e d0# to the rest of the economy. Of course whether thPeyrixa;; itor not, approach subordinates the consumer is tl • " , whose ability to buy good L real generator of lasting prosperity. You may recall that this trie down method was the one that Cooli the " dge tried, and i produced evitable results. --ttWK -:_:_ _ __ : .:.<,,_ - .... -::-_" i For Your Labor DaY i Entertannmenf ! PAG TWO WALSH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA elly's ................ lO  w. _e,  rner ._ ............. . Politeness usually pays off, always say. You may be a diamond in the rough and extremely valu- able. but if you don't mind your manners people are just as liable as not to think you're a very small pebble and heave you out on your ear. So I think it is the duty of young boys and girls just starting out in life, to learn to be polite, and not go around kicking stray dogs and sticking pins in little babies. My own manners are kinds av- erage. I mean, I wouldn't kick a dog unless he got in my way, and especially if he wuz a real big hungry-looking brute like some of the ones I sneak past up in my neighborhood. I hardly ever eat peas with a knife, mostly because they always roll off and are very hard to spot on our checkered tile floor. And since I've gotten married I hardly ever yell down to the far end of the table "Shoot the spuds up!" But even so, may- be I could stand a little jackin '= up in the manners' department. Any- how, when I got this letter in the mail about a month ago from a company advertising a book on etiquette, my sales resistance was pretty low and I kept right on reading. Especially since they had been reading their own book and were real polite about it; suggest- ing in a nice way of course, that maybe if I wasn't as I wanted to be, it was because I made a fox- pass occasionally. Like using other people's toothbrushes, laughing in a loud and boorish manner at holes in folk's clothing, or flicking my cigarette ashes in my neighbors's pants cuff. and so forth• hwk So I signed the card and in a few days along came the book. It was a very nice book, I think, but about that time my aunt Rosamond took off for the Democratic convention in Chicago and there was more action around here than Marilyn Monroe walking up a very long staircase. Most of my spare time was spent kicking the linotype and saying mean things to a big ugly- looking newspaper press. Anyhow, I didn't get a chance to look at the book and see if I wanted to send it back or not. My experience has been in the past though, that no matter how fast you shoot it back to them companies, 'the ten.day trial period just expired" and ya wind up keeping the whatchama- callit. Well. pretty soon I got a statement from the publishers and they wanted I should send them $5.09 for the book. But by that time one of my kids had busted a front window in the house, a neighbor's dog had swallowed my last $10 bill, and the missus read about a big sale on peanut butter at a local grocery store, so you can see I had a lotta things on my mind. A little later another bill came, but I was so darn busy fixing windows, fol- lowing that dog around, and car- fling home peanut butter for the ittle woman that I didn't have any e  monkey around with un- important things like paying for books on etiquette. hwk Well, things went on like that for awhile, and letters and bills were coming thick and fast. It got to be such a doggone nuisance that finally I read one of them, and ya know it made me kind of half sore at 'era, because they were starting to tell me all the things that would happen to me if I didn't settle up pronto with $5.09. About that time my aunt Rosamond came back and she let me see her expense account. Right then I felt a little ashamed and figured I had no excuse for not paying for the book. So I did. hwk But I guess the publishers had got so in the habit of writing that they couldn't stop, and by that e they had invited in a collect- ion agency to help take care of their correspondence. This agency has a name so long that I ain't even gomaa' bother you with it, but it was founded to preserve stabil- ity, arre abtmes, and aid in pun- ishments of violations. It said so right on the letterhead. The letter said they'd ive me exactly I0 days to square up for that book, and that I didn have to bother sending the book back ither, because it wouldn't do me arty good. They went on to say that ! needn't try and tell them I wu laeoke, out of work or ill. They Mmp . " t"'- waa ..... to collect tha o uu Come .... " xlll O! high wafer, (that s whatthey said and I better send it air mail, spec telegram. I ten tal delivery or Ym I was sick, but what really macL me sad, wuz to see that • arned Duffy, nO Murphy--well ar hman anyway, had written tl ultimatum. hwk Well, right off the bat I could see' this situation called for a soft the gendarmes It was serious! Pol- ,,vat called for--and quick as a schoolgirl's blush, I savvied just what to do• I'd check that et- iquette book and find out how to write Mr. Casey, no Mr. Murphy, for surely a book that cost $5.09 I ought to tell what to do in such an emergency. It had to be polite, but not servile if you know what I mean. Dignified. yet friendly, with a touch of mild sorrow that I should be so misunderstood, and yet firm. So I wrote• hwk But to make a long story short, I got a letter yesterday from my pen pal Hogan, er Murphy telling me that his company had received my August 14th letter and that its contents had wiped away all mis- understandings. Well I sure felt awful good about that and was really grateful to old chapter 12 for geiting me out of that jam. But after a few seconds a suspicious thought flitted through my mind. and sure enuff, the gouldurn letter that Dooley, no Murphy was so pleased to get was my check for $5.09. Not the, gentlemanly letter that I had written them. Apparently that publishing outfit is nothing but downright plain hypocrites, for what they was interested in. wasn't my good manners but the money I've earned during the years I've lived as a normal slob. Well, its too late to do anything now and about the only thing that etiquette book can be used for is to park the youngest kid on at the dinner table. As for me. I'm gonna' start eating my peas with a knife again, only I'll fool that Murphyrll mix 'em with mashed potatoes so I don't have to be picking them out of my shirt pockets or pants cuffs. hwk This column so far has never spouted poetry mostly because the writer is probably the poorest judge of poetry living. On one oc- casion I bravely ventured the opinion that Robert W. Service was my favorite poet and "The Shoot- ing of Dan McGrew" my favorite poem. All present smiled sadly, shook their heads gently and eyed me pityingly. I never felt more out- of-place in my life. unless it was the time somebody forgot to lock the door on a steam room in the Minneapolis YWCA. But when some humorous person, with ob- vious good taste, stuck this on my spindle while I was having coffee Monday morning, I figured that it was too good to get thrown away by some uneducated water drinker. hwk Th horse and mule live 30 years And nothing know of wine & beers. The goat and sheep at 20 die And never taste of Scotch or Rye. The cow drinks water by the ton And at 18 is mostly done. The dog at 15 cashes in Without' the aid of rum or gin. The cat in milk and water =oaks And then at 12 it always croaks. The modest, sober, drybone hen Lays eggs for us, then dies at 10. All animals are strictly dry The sinless live and swiftly die; But sinful, ginful, rum-soaked men Survive for three score years & 10. And some of us, the mighty few, Keep drinking 'till we're 92. hwk The Last Word . . . ru bet you'd be surprised if I listed names of guys asking me in sort of a nonchalant way if I hap- pened to have the magazine with the picture of the nudist wedding (mentioned last week) handy, To protect myself from pomible injury I'll keep my yap shut. Light-Weight Aluminum POTATO CONVEYORS THESE WOMEN! M 1 Ii m love--I mean t real, enduring, eternal kind d love--for two weeks during vacalionl" Your Home and You The Walsh County Press Mrs. Harry O'Brien /-, Editor & Publisher Published every Thursday from The Press building, Park PAver, I ltlt Bakota, and entered in the Park River postoffice under the Act of C0" gress of March 3, 1879. Subscription rates, $2.50 a year in North Dak0t $3 a year elsewhere. Editorially Speaking.... Already it seems quite clear that the 1956 Republican campaign will center around "peace and prosperity" and as the threat of war in tl trouble spots of the world increases. GOP speakers will really Ir down on the "prosperity" theme. Right now. the Republican orators are pointing to our coUtrY' economm gains in 1955, comoared with the recession year of 1954. t this oversimplified political argument merely serves to mask the trat about the GOP prosperity. The vital facts that the Republican mott pieces will not bring to the public are: "k The average rate of growth of the economy under the Republi is less than half what it was under the Democrats. The number of new businesses springing up each year is only a eighth as large under the Republican "prosperity" as it was under tic Dems. $ The rate of business failures under the so-called "GOP prosP erit is twice what it was under the Democrats. , Prosperity under the Republicans has been concentrated largeM 0. the giant corporations while other segments of the economy have 1 far behind. By Joyce L. Fritzler. Home Extension Agen Republican Before we know it, the summer phases of homemaking and or agri- speeches about "prosperity" slur over such _ will be over and it will be time to culture may organize a 4-H club. I problems as the farm slump, rising consumer debt, chronically deprT make plans to have the children They must have one or more adult areas, and a hidden inflation, all of which threaten the future healtlt ready to go back to school. The up- leaders before they organize. It is the economy. roach of fall also means that many organizations take up their pro- gram of activities after a quiet or inactive summer, families return from vacations and settle down to work again and preparations for fall activities begins. Among the organizations begin- ning a new year in the fall are the 4-H and Homemaker clubs. Their club year begins October 1. For anyone who is interested in joining or organizing a 4-H or Homemaker cluh in your community there are only a few requirements necessary to organize a club. To organize a Homemakers club gather together ten or more women who are interested in studying and receiving practical and recent in- formation on phases of homemaking. Contact your Home Extension Agent who will explain' club work and help organize the group. Homemaker club members must be willing to share the responsibil- ity of holding an office in their also important that the parents support their club work as the pro- jects will require their help and co- operation. In addition to the project work, club members receive many other opportunities belonging to a 4-H club. They have a chance to work and play with other boys and girls of their age. Members have the op- portunity to participate in County 4-H events such as camp, achieve- ment day, demonstration and judg- ing contest, 4-H talent program and other events. Older members with good club records are awarded many state and national trips and other awards• If there are parents, young peo- ple and leaders who are interested in organizing a 4-H club contact the county or Home Agent and arrange for the first meeting. Now is the time to organize a 4-H club. GRAFTON COUPLE WED club and to attend training meetings Announcement has been made of where they will study a phase of I the marriage of Mrs. Clara Munroe the project assigned them. They[and Dr. C. 1t. Tompkins, both of will then present this lesson to their  Grafton. The ceremony took place club members at a local club meet- ] Aug• 20 at the home of Dr. Tomp- ing. Homemaker clubs may be organ- ized any time of the year but the fall is best so that members may at- tend all the training meetings to receive their lessons. 4-H clubs may be organized any time from Oct. 1 to May 1. Members must be between the ages of nine and twenty• A club member must reach the age of 10 before June 1 of the club year she or he joins• A group of about eight or more boys or girls interested in studying kin's son and daughter-in-law, Dr. and Mrs. W. A. Tompkins at Elm- hurst, Ill. Dr. and Mrs. Tompkins will be at home in Grafton after Sept. 15. TO HEAD FORDVILLE BANK Dan Bartholomew of St. Thomas, has been named manager of the Fordville branch of the Walsh County State "bank of Grafton. He succeeds E. J. Beetz, who has resigne d to devote his time to the insurance business. ! =_ .= .= l ! we handle ! nnn !UmMNIII | 14-in Belt Conveyors i Complete With TAKE THE FAM|LY TO THE Built-in Motor STOC K CAR RACES /4 HP on 12 ft. to 16˝ ft, m, on s ft. ,o 24 t. YOU can easily hve us hanclle youe m_ Weight Price CCC loan for you. Just be su to speci m 12 ft---297 Ibs ........ $590.00 | River. 134 ft.--313 Ibs ...... $820.00 this bank aS your agent whl you apPlY Park Speedway z5 ft--329 Ibe ......... $60.00 for your loam Weql advma the money m. ....... : Sun Sept 2 Mon Sept $ 18 1 lbs ........ $750.00 to yOU as soon aS you reoeive your CCC  • • • I 19˝ ft--77 Ibs ...... $780.00 22421 ft--393ft_4091bSlbs ........ ..... _$840.005810"00 , county committee's approval Bring STARTS 2:30 P. M.  24 tt--425 lbs ........ $870.00 your approved papers with you--.we'll need them in completing your loan. SlO z0 DAYS DOOR PRiZŁ Required for Delivery m MEAGHER FHIST STATE BANK | . " Additional drivers and cars from Canada and PARK RIVER, N. D. DIAL 22801 ! sots will be here next Sunday. ,,  ,mm.m  i i Refrubment, Served on the Grounds iim ==;m;mlmmnmgmmmmmnmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm " The key to continued prosperity, it has been pointed out, depen a sound increase in the quantity of goods produced each year W itl#lt this steady increase, the economy can not keep up with th; natiO' growing population and its expanding needs• However in the hhr# i::rs;f:he Eisenhower Administration, the average increase in p rO; ' g cls and services has been about 3 per cent--less than half  it was under the Democrats. This reduced rate of growth, if allowed continue, can have serious consequences, for economists agree that $ ] per cent growth is not enough to match the country's mounting need Part of the slippage can be traced to the laree number of the b" nesses which have failed since the Eisenhower " Nixon Administrsti# took office. Figures compiled by the financial re ortin " e Dtt $ p _ servlc , radstreet. show that while the number of business failures in 1947 " only 3,474, there were 11,000 in 1954, and at least that many in the  called "boom" year of 1955. The failure rate has doubled between last 10 Democratic years and the first three Republican years A cor, account of GOP business failures must include no only those  folded uu, but those which were never born One of the clearest sig the real strength of the economy during the Truman Administration . the fact that more than 50,000 bmdneekes were started each year. I/l Ike• the number has dropped to an average of about 6,500"a  year. The situation has grown so serious, in fact that the Commerce I..l ment has issued the somber finding that a business starting up no-- about a 50-50 chance of lasting two years and that four out of five ' die within 10 years. Republican speechmakers, in painting their glowing picture of t, perity, will also avoid mentioning that the economic gains have heavily weighted in favor of the big business segment of our econOl.  Since 1952, the 'take-home pay" (profits after taxes) of eorpOrati˘. has risen 36 per cent, @hile the average person's take-home pay has C up only nine per cent. And in the same period, while farm income ed 27 per cent, the income of corporation ,stockholders rose hY sw that amount• In fact, in the last half of 1955, corporation sharehOl__ received more income from dividends than all of the farmers in I country received from faming. This lopsided prosperity zs no economic alt of ..... " quirk. It is the re !. conscious Administration policies which put the interests of big b O# ahead of the interest of small business, farmers and workin - people, the theory that sooner or later, big business nroe tvwi]]n v " v "]] triekl" e d0# to the rest of the economy. Of course whether thPeyrixa;; itor not, approach subordinates the consumer is tl • " , whose ability to buy good L real generator of lasting prosperity. You may recall that this trie down method was the one that Cooli the " dge tried, and i produced evitable results. --ttWK -:_:_ _ __ : .:.<,,_ - .... -::-_" i For Your Labor DaY i Entertannmenf !