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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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July 29, 1954     Walsh County Press
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July 29, 1954
 

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Still Not Too Late.... See Us FIRST for HAIL INSURANCE First State Insurance Agency Dial 22801 Park River, N. D. WALSH COUNTY PRESS 71 PARK PCER, WALSH COUNTY, N. D. THURSDAY, JULY 29, 1954 NUMBER 13 - Cole Vows June 20 vows were exchanged Marie Hartje, daugh- and Mrs. Anton Hartje of and Norman Cole, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Norman Cole, Sunday afternoon in St. Paul's Lutheran at St. Thomas with Rev. : G. Gesell officiating at the ring ceremony. satin bows decorated the the church and two large of white and pink peonies the altar formed the set- ceremony. Puppe, organist, accom- Kvamme who sang Love" and "The Lord's bride was escorted to the al- V her father. Her white ankle gown of ruffled net over styled with full skirt and sleeved lace jacket Her veil length and she car- uet of red roses with rosebuds. attendant was Mary Brown a blue ballerina-length of net over satin and carried of yellow gladioli. Cole of Park River at- his brother and Orville Rol- and Milton Kvamme were the in the church parlors after which the couple a trip to Winnipeg. Young people attended the Cbunty School here. The been employed as a role- OPerator at Grafton and Mr. in Grand Forks where will make their home. the wedding guests were brother and sister- and Mrs. Bill Cole of Wil- and his two brothers-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Traverse City, Mich.. and Mrs. Hilliard Maxwell of TAVERN FINED guilty to selling intoxi- minors, Gilbert Leedahl, tavern licensee, paid fine of $100 when he appeared at Grafton before Justice Two Park River boys, and 17, allegedly purchased the tavern. me youths allegedly pur- l beer from a second Hoople and Norton Hendrickson, the was slated for a hearing Justice Nyman Tuesday. He Thursday and asked a to permit time to be by counsel. WMF Workers Plan Retreat Mrs. James Skyrud of Adams, circuit president, will preside at the Women's Missionary Federation workers retreat at the Bible camp west of Park River Tuesday, Aug. 3. The day-Iong event will get un- der way at 9:45 a. m. with a recess at noon. The afternoon program is set for 1:30 o'clock. A talk on juvenile delinquency by States Attorney Elton Ringsak will be a highlight of the session. Eleanore Bjorkman of the WMF office will lead in Bible study and a skit entitled "Meet the WMF" will be presented by the various departments of the Federation. The noon luncheon will be served by the Zion ladies aid. Volunteer Farm mployment Aids Named in County Volunteer farm labor representa- tives, individuals who assist the North Dakota State Employment service during the harvest season, have been appointed in Walsh and Pembina counties, Arthur J. Gil- bertson, interviewer in charge of the Grafton NDSES offices states. The representatives donate; their time to assist farmers in securing workers and combines. They also inform the employment office about the labor supply and demand and progress of the harvest in their respective communities. Farmers in Walsh and Pembina counties are urged by Gilbertson to evaluate their labor needs for the coming harvest season and im- mediately place their orders for workers with the farm labor repre- sentative in their community or at the NDSES office at the city hall in Grafton. Appointed for Walsh County are Tim Vavrosky, Park River; Jim Johnson, Johnson Stores. Adams: Orlin Nelson. Gutterud-Nelson Co., Edinburg; Earl Bannermann, Bar- X-Bar, Fordville; Leonard Midboe, Midboe's Service, Hoople; Wilfred Sherek. Sherek's Bar, Lankln; Ed Tupa, chief of police, Minto. Officials of the NDSES are set- ting up machinery to provide farm- ers with additional equipment and workers to harvest another large crop, Gilbertson said. How much custom machinery and extra work- ers will be needed is known only to the farmers themselves and they are asked to report as soon as pos- sible so that neither a shortage nor a surplus of labor will develop. Edinburg News Notes IELD FOR MRS. GUNHUS services were held July Henning Gunhus who aly 13 at the hospital in Park Where she had been a patient days. Bergeson officiated ites which were held at the atheran church in Edin- was in the church Windingland sang two in English and one in They were "Beyond set" and "Tank Naar Een- Tvake er for Sveenden." were Ernest, Arthur Gunhus. Edroy Brand- Brunsvold and Ken- vas a life member Lutheran church and of aid. those who came from a attend the funeral were Mrs. C. P. Baker and An- all of Kenyon, Minn.. of Wanamingo, Helen Frithem of Foss- Mr. and Mrs Selmer An- of Karlstad, Minn., Mr. and Gunhus. Grand Forks: Arthur Gunhus, Mr. Wallace Gunhus, Mrs. Ole Grieve and all of Fairdale; Mr. and Gunhus, Adams; Erick Mr. and Mrs. Ole son, Orval, of Derrick. James McGinley, of Mrs. Otto Hoverson, of oOo Zastera and baby of ted for two weeks with parents, Mr. and Mrs. at the home of Mrs. and son, Emmett, are Alice Log of New York and Mrs. Bert Blowers of Minneapolis. They are daughters of Mrs. Lee. Olga Swenson and two children, Karen and Marlene, spent several days at Grafton at the Sena Swen- son home. W. Johann Von Hoffman left re- cently for Phoenix, Ariz., after vis- iting for several weeks at the home of Mrs. Olga Sonderson. Gloria and Donna Eckles of Su- perior, Wis.. and Mrs. Skytland of Lakota visited with Mrs. Gladys McKosley at the Halvor Kalbeck- dalen home Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Ole Hellem of Ad- ams spent Monday afternoon at the Oluf Olson home. Mrs. George Johnstone, Mrs. Lin- den Tharalson of ttoople were vis- itors of Mrs. Tillie Stenerson one afternoon last week. Mabel Ellingson returned from a week's visit at the Chas. Berdahl home at Cavalier. Lydia Anderson returned, this week to Seattle after a month s vis- it at the home of her mother, Mrs. Clara Anderson,' who is seriouslY ill at her home. Orval Olson is home on a short furlough from the army to visit his brother, Selmer Olson and family. Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Evenson of Saskatchewan, Canada. have been visiting at the Clifford and Ludvig Troftgruben homes here and with other relatives. Eva Sonderson, who has spent several weeks here at the home of her mother, Olga Sonderson, and at the Bud Sonderson home, left last week for Phoenix, Ariz. Week'end visitors at the Alvin Gullingsrud home were Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Gullingsrud of Fargo. On Friday Mrs. Frank Wy-ite and Mavis called there. 3 Churches to Hold Installation Services for New Pastor Sunday The Rev. Leonard E. Smestad of Minneapolis will be installed as the new paor in me Par River Luth- eran amsh on Sunday, August isL l-le wnl succeed the Rev. J.B. lxoekne who was in Park River for many years and is now serving a parish at Garvin, Minnesota. The installation service is  for 10:30 a. m. at Our Saviour's church and will be held in 1he main audirilun of ,rite ne church. At Golden Valley church he instaUaJdon will be a* 1 p. m., and at Pleasa Valley at 2:30. Pastor Smesad will preach at all thr svice Rev. Smestad has attended the Lutheran Bible Institute and Augs- burg College, both in Minneapolis, and is a graduate of Luther Theo- logical Seminary in St. Paul. Pre- viously he has served parishes at Pequot Lakes and at McGrath, Minnesota, and at Vienna, South Dakota. He comes to Park River from Minneapolis where he has been pastor of Nazareth Lutheran Church. While in Minneapolis he was instrumental in affecting a merger between his congregation Mrs. C. P. O'Brien Dies Wednesday Mrs. C. P. O'Brien, former Park River woman, died about 8 o'clock last evening in a Minneapolis hospi- tal following a long illness with cancer. Born in Park River August 19, 1890, Mrs. O'Brien was the former Florence Dougherty and was a sis- ter of Harold and Walter Dougherty of this city. She was the only daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Dougherty. She graduated from the local high school and from the North Dakota University. at Grand Forks where she was a member of the Alpha Phi sorority. On July 1, 1916, she and Mr. O'Brien were married and they lived in Park River until 1931 when they moved to Minneapolis. Mr. O'Brien was associated with the Farmers Security Bank here and later with the First State Bank af- ter the two firms merged. Survivors include the husband and five children. These are Mrs. Jack Strautz (Jeanne), Mrs. Lloyd Balcome (Nancy), Mary Ann and Pat O'Brien, all of Minneapolis, and another in order to form a new congregation comprising some over eighteen hundred members. Pastor Smestad and his wife, the former Esther Melom," are natives of North Dakota having grown up near Velva. They have five children three girls and two boys. Installation will be conducted by the Rev. T. H. Megorden of Grafton who is president of the Park. River Circuit of the Evangelical Luth- eran church. Park River Juniors Win Baseball Title Park River whilped up a two-run spurt in the last inning last night to edge Minto 4 to 3 and clinch the Walsh County Junior American Legion baseball crown. The Park River--Minto game was played at Chandler Field in Grafton as a neutral field after the two teams had met during the tournament at Minto and he first game was disallowed when Park River protested the eligibility of one of the Minto team members. Park River downed Auburn 13 to 4 in its first game and then after Park River was declared the win- ner of the game with Minto by forfeit the Park River Juniors blanked Edinburg Sunday in the finals 20 to 0. However, State Ath- letic Director Nate Cummings re- vised the decision of District Ath- letic Director Einer Wahl Tuesday night, ruling that the game must be re-played. But he upheld Park Riv- er's protest against one player, S. Brta, Minto pitcher. Park River coach Leo Englerth protested that the youth was not eligible because he had played independent ball in violation of a Junior Legion regu- lation. (He made the protest after Barta bad batted once when the score was 0-0 but Minto led 7-2 at the end of the game). Park River is scheduled to play Larimore at Minto this evening (Thursday) for the district title at 6:30. The winner then takes on MacVille at Minto Sunday in the regional playoff for the right to go to the state tournament. In the ,game at Grafton Wednes- day night Minto got the jump by scoring two runs in the first inning. Park River tallied once in the first and again in the fourth to tie the BIG 'YES' VOTE GIVEN WHEAT REFERENDUM Waish county wheat growers gave an overwhelming majority to marketing quotas for the 1955 crop, W. S. Peterka, office manager of the Agricultural and Stabilization Committee reported. The vote in the county, as com- piled by the ASC committee, found that 1,701 voted in favor of the 1 quotas and 63 were opposed. I A favorable vote of two-thirds, nationwide, is necessary to impose the quota and thus give a higher support price on wheat produced. New Lutheran Pastor Rev. Leonard E. Smestad Hospital Auxiliary Benefit Nets $300 About $300 was raised for St. Ansgar's hospital auxiliary at a benefit tea and sale held Wednes- day of last week at the home of Mrs. Karl J. Farup and Mrs. I. E. Hansen. Mrs. Jke Veum and Mrs. Fred Dencker were awarded prizes for the flower arrangements they en- tered a the flower show held in con- nection wlth the event. Mrs. M. C. Flaten of Edinburg was in charge of this feature at which plants and bulbs were sold. There was a large number of entries and the variety and color added much to the dis- plays. Food and gift items were sold and tea was served in the dining room with Mrs. F. E. Weed pouring. Piano music throughout the after- noon was provided by John C. H. Moan and Mrs. C. E. Lien. local music teachers. ] Little Worm Damage Noted Little damage by army worms in Walsh county has been noted as yet, Robert W. 2mstrup, extension , agent has stated after an inspection tour of fields in eastern and central sections of the county. While many fields have worms attacking grain foliage, the pests, except in isolated cases, ard not in sufficient numbers to cause appre- ciable damage, nor to warrant at- tempts at control by spraying, the agent believes. Some of the worst infested fields have worms at the rate of abgut i0 to the square foot, Mr. Arnstrup aid. This number, he believes, s not sufficient to greatly damage the grain. While worms may chop away parts of the leaves and even eat beards from the heads of the grain, few kernels are destroyed. Geerally, Mr. Axnstrup said, in- festation is greatest in low spots on a field where grain is lodged be- cause of dense growth. Effective spraying of such a field is difficult, as the chemical will not be able to penetrate to the bottom of the foli- age. Worms coming near the head of the grain and thus into contact with the chemical will be killed, while near the bottom, the worms will be able to continue their dep- radations. Thousands of acres in Minnesota and North Dakota have been treat- ed by chemicals where the expense I did not warrant the operation. Mr. Amstrup believes. In the county, the agent says, the average infestation of army worms may not be over one per square foot of grain. This would not be sufficient to greatly damage the maturing grain. Furthermore, Mr. Amstrup said, many of the worms are now enter- ing the pupate stage when they will go into the ground and hibernate. The worms proceed from larvae to pupate stage in about four weeks. When a worm is from one to one and one-half inches long, it is near the pupate stage. Farmers are advised by the coun- ty agent to Watch fields closely, es- pechlIy during the late evening or early morning hours when worms are feeding. If infestation appears to be over 10 worms per square foot. consideration should be given to spraying the plot. Grain is not believed to be dam- aged in so far as marketin is con- cerned, by chemical application, Mr, Amstrup said after contacting the:, NDAC entomologists by phone. If spraying is done five or six days before harvesting, it is believed there can be no reason why the grain can not immediately be put and Walter O'Brien, Kodiak, Alas- ka. Besides the two brothers in Park River there is another brother, Jack Dougherty of Waterloo, Ia. There are also 12 grandchildren. Funeral' services will be held at St. Mary's Catholic church in Park River Saturday at 10 a. m. with Roy. J. J. O'Meara officiating. Bur- ial will be in Mt. Calvary cemetery. Members of the family are ex- pected to arrive here today. Anton F. Schanllec Anton F. Schanilec, 53, native of Prarie Centre township, died un- expectedly July 19 at his home. He was born in Waish County June I0, 1901 and resided in the Prarie Centre township area his  entire life. Mr. Schanilee married Elizabeth Dusek at Vesleyville June 27. 1926. Survivors are his widow; his mo- ther, Mrs. Mary Schanflec; one son, Valarian, at home; two daughters, Mrs. James Kiedrowski (Frances) and Mrs. Leo K. Klave(Alexia), both of Minto; three brothers, John J. of Grafton. Albert J. of Minto and Louis W. of Pisek; two sisters, Mrs. Anton Dnsek of Lewistown, Mont., and Mrs. Frank Stropnicky, Grand Forks, anl one grandchild. His father died in 1951. One brother also preceded him in death. Mr. Schanilec was a member of the board of supervisors in Prarie Centre township and a member of his local school board. He was a member of St. Luke's Catholic church at Vesleyville and a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Workmen lodge. Services were conducted Thurs- ' c [ - .-  Lukes hurch Rev, . da lI1 o. V Y^r officiated. Burial was in . .... the I church cemetery. al.lOearers were: [ Louis" John aria AlDert Sch-,-d,nlec, William Suda, Frank Stropnick and Jerome Dusek. Y' score. The count stayed that way ntil th enth and f" " in Among the guests were friends u __e sev _ real mn g.l ............. in Irom FlseK LanKln Edlnourg, Aci- M to scored when Llzakowskl ' ' .. drew a walk sole QeoAnA s, *hn I ares and Grafton, as well as many went the rest of th _ [from Park River The Grafto e way on a . aoub] hv D v+, Dv w;,,,- women presented a bolt of outing r-Ili 'b" hn'-" n+'h" -m flannel to the auxiliary for hospital frame-when-Bin'g'L'arsonsmas%e-'d ]use' Mrs. M. B. Overbye, auxiliary a line drive into center field that uresident, expressed appreciation was good for two bases. David Flint walked. Tony Leonard rapped out a double that brought Larson in for the first run and Ronnie Berger popped the ball into short right field to score Flint and ice the game. Larson and Dvorak were the win- nine, battery. D. Shelley was on the mound for Minto while O'Connell was behind the plate. FARM FATALITIES SEEN' "IN NORTH DAKOTA While safety practices need more general acceptance in order to pre- vent the needless toll of lives taken by farm accidents each year, pro- gress is being made in North Da- kota toward safer farms and homes This is pointed out by John Zayl- skie, forester and farm safety spe- cialist of NDAC Extension service. He cites North Dakota State Health department figures to show that fatal accidents on farms were re- duced almost 50%, comparing 1943 with I953. Forty fatal farm accidents occur- red in 1943. compared with 24 in 1953. Actually, fatal accidents have been high in number in the past 10 years, but a trend downward is ap- parent. Zaylskie urges frm people to make Farm Safety Week. now be- ing observed, a starting point to- ward safer practices. Power ma- chines, especially tractors, are in- volved in most fatalities in North Dakota. He suggests that attention be given immediaitely to safety rules in the handling of such equip- ment. for this gesture of good will and thanked Mrs. Farup and Mrs. Han- sen for offering their home for this community project. She also ex-] pressed gratitude to all who help- ed in any way to make- the event such a success. County Bond Sale Totals S12,14,812 A iota] of $12,142,812 of Series E and H bonds were purchased by North Dakotans the first six months of 1954, or 19% more than the $10.- 225.563 purchased during the first half of 1953. according to County Savings Bonds Chairman Gordon S. Larson of Park River. "Sales for the state, during the month of June. amounted to $1,790,- 418. 25 more than June sales last year, and is $158.519 better than last month's $1,631,899," Mr. Larson said. He further added. "Walsh countY sold $69.602 of Series E and H Sv- ins bonds during the month Of June this year which brings the total of sales of these two issues to $396,061 for the first six months of 1954. This figure compares to the first half of 1953 and is more than a 20% improvement in the purchase of these bonds 'in the county. ,'Nationally," Mr. Larson conclud- ed, "purchases of Series E and H on the market. QuRe a number of fields in the county have been sprayed for army worm control, Mr. Amstrup said. He cautioned farmers not to get "panicky" about the infestation but to study apparent damage careful- ly before incurring the expense of spraying. Baseball Season Concluded Sunday Grafton and Veseleyville came through with victories in the Walsh County baseball league Sunday to tie for the lead in the eastern div- ision. The schedule ended Sunday. ConwayFordville won the wes- tern diviison title Sunday by beat- ing Park River 11 to 8. Conway. Fordvi]le will now play the win- ner of the Grafton-Veseleyville play-off in the best two out of three series for the league cham- pionship. Ron Lunde pitched one-hit ball Sunday as Grafton came through with a 5 to 0 victory over Warsaw in a game played at Chandler field in Grafton. Wilson and Halliday pitched for Warsaw. Bob Evenson pitched three-hit ball for Nash Sunday but his team- mates fielding support left some- thing required and Veseleyville came through with an 8 to 1 vic- tory. Evenson struck out 17 Vese- leyville batters but Nash commit- ted a total of eight errors during the game. Ernie Schanilec hurled for Veseleyville and permitted four hits. His team made one error. Ole Omdahl hurled Conway-Ford- savins bonds during the first six ville to its victory over Park River. months of 1954 amounted to $2.516.- Merle Onstad was on the mound for 000.000, the best sales record for the Park River. first half of any year since 1945'. is 13% above the same period of last PARK RIVER MARKET Durum $3.45: Wheat 2.16: Oats .55; year:of twoandyearsiS ago."44% better than that 1 Barley $1.25", Flax $3.27. A CE 00HURSDAY, JULY, Thursday, Aug.5 American Legion Coliseum ! MusiebyPrestonL00e Music by l)ei.Clayto...} Still Not Too Late.... See Us FIRST for HAIL INSURANCE First State Insurance Agency Dial 22801 Park River, N. D. WALSH COUNTY PRESS 71 PARK PCER, WALSH COUNTY, N. D. THURSDAY, JULY 29, 1954 NUMBER 13 - Cole Vows June 20 vows were exchanged Marie Hartje, daugh- and Mrs. Anton Hartje of and Norman Cole, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Norman Cole, Sunday afternoon in St. Paul's Lutheran at St. Thomas with Rev. : G. Gesell officiating at the ring ceremony. satin bows decorated the the church and two large of white and pink peonies the altar formed the set- ceremony. Puppe, organist, accom- Kvamme who sang Love" and "The Lord's bride was escorted to the al- V her father. Her white ankle gown of ruffled net over styled with full skirt and sleeved lace jacket Her veil length and she car- uet of red roses with rosebuds. attendant was Mary Brown a blue ballerina-length of net over satin and carried of yellow gladioli. Cole of Park River at- his brother and Orville Rol- and Milton Kvamme were the in the church parlors after which the couple a trip to Winnipeg. Young people attended the Cbunty School here. The been employed as a role- OPerator at Grafton and Mr. in Grand Forks where will make their home. the wedding guests were brother and sister- and Mrs. Bill Cole of Wil- and his two brothers-in-law Mr. and Mrs. Norbert Traverse City, Mich.. and Mrs. Hilliard Maxwell of TAVERN FINED guilty to selling intoxi- minors, Gilbert Leedahl, tavern licensee, paid fine of $100 when he appeared at Grafton before Justice Two Park River boys, and 17, allegedly purchased the tavern. me youths allegedly pur- l beer from a second Hoople and Norton Hendrickson, the was slated for a hearing Justice Nyman Tuesday. He Thursday and asked a to permit time to be by counsel. WMF Workers Plan Retreat Mrs. James Skyrud of Adams, circuit president, will preside at the Women's Missionary Federation workers retreat at the Bible camp west of Park River Tuesday, Aug. 3. The day-Iong event will get un- der way at 9:45 a. m. with a recess at noon. The afternoon program is set for 1:30 o'clock. A talk on juvenile delinquency by States Attorney Elton Ringsak will be a highlight of the session. Eleanore Bjorkman of the WMF office will lead in Bible study and a skit entitled "Meet the WMF" will be presented by the various departments of the Federation. The noon luncheon will be served by the Zion ladies aid. Volunteer Farm mployment Aids Named in County Volunteer farm labor representa- tives, individuals who assist the North Dakota State Employment service during the harvest season, have been appointed in Walsh and Pembina counties, Arthur J. Gil- bertson, interviewer in charge of the Grafton NDSES offices states. The representatives donate; their time to assist farmers in securing workers and combines. They also inform the employment office about the labor supply and demand and progress of the harvest in their respective communities. Farmers in Walsh and Pembina counties are urged by Gilbertson to evaluate their labor needs for the coming harvest season and im- mediately place their orders for workers with the farm labor repre- sentative in their community or at the NDSES office at the city hall in Grafton. Appointed for Walsh County are Tim Vavrosky, Park River; Jim Johnson, Johnson Stores. Adams: Orlin Nelson. Gutterud-Nelson Co., Edinburg; Earl Bannermann, Bar- X-Bar, Fordville; Leonard Midboe, Midboe's Service, Hoople; Wilfred Sherek. Sherek's Bar, Lankln; Ed Tupa, chief of police, Minto. Officials of the NDSES are set- ting up machinery to provide farm- ers with additional equipment and workers to harvest another large crop, Gilbertson said. How much custom machinery and extra work- ers will be needed is known only to the farmers themselves and they are asked to report as soon as pos- sible so that neither a shortage nor a surplus of labor will develop. Edinburg News Notes IELD FOR MRS. GUNHUS services were held July Henning Gunhus who aly 13 at the hospital in Park Where she had been a patient days. Bergeson officiated ites which were held at the atheran church in Edin- was in the church Windingland sang two in English and one in They were "Beyond set" and "Tank Naar Een- Tvake er for Sveenden." were Ernest, Arthur Gunhus. Edroy Brand- Brunsvold and Ken- vas a life member Lutheran church and of aid. those who came from a attend the funeral were Mrs. C. P. Baker and An- all of Kenyon, Minn.. of Wanamingo, Helen Frithem of Foss- Mr. and Mrs Selmer An- of Karlstad, Minn., Mr. and Gunhus. Grand Forks: Arthur Gunhus, Mr. Wallace Gunhus, Mrs. Ole Grieve and all of Fairdale; Mr. and Gunhus, Adams; Erick Mr. and Mrs. Ole son, Orval, of Derrick. James McGinley, of Mrs. Otto Hoverson, of oOo Zastera and baby of ted for two weeks with parents, Mr. and Mrs. at the home of Mrs. and son, Emmett, are Alice Log of New York and Mrs. Bert Blowers of Minneapolis. They are daughters of Mrs. Lee. Olga Swenson and two children, Karen and Marlene, spent several days at Grafton at the Sena Swen- son home. W. Johann Von Hoffman left re- cently for Phoenix, Ariz., after vis- iting for several weeks at the home of Mrs. Olga Sonderson. Gloria and Donna Eckles of Su- perior, Wis.. and Mrs. Skytland of Lakota visited with Mrs. Gladys McKosley at the Halvor Kalbeck- dalen home Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. Ole Hellem of Ad- ams spent Monday afternoon at the Oluf Olson home. Mrs. George Johnstone, Mrs. Lin- den Tharalson of ttoople were vis- itors of Mrs. Tillie Stenerson one afternoon last week. Mabel Ellingson returned from a week's visit at the Chas. Berdahl home at Cavalier. Lydia Anderson returned, this week to Seattle after a month s vis- it at the home of her mother, Mrs. Clara Anderson,' who is seriouslY ill at her home. Orval Olson is home on a short furlough from the army to visit his brother, Selmer Olson and family. Mr. and Mrs. Adolph Evenson of Saskatchewan, Canada. have been visiting at the Clifford and Ludvig Troftgruben homes here and with other relatives. Eva Sonderson, who has spent several weeks here at the home of her mother, Olga Sonderson, and at the Bud Sonderson home, left last week for Phoenix, Ariz. Week'end visitors at the Alvin Gullingsrud home were Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Gullingsrud of Fargo. On Friday Mrs. Frank Wy-ite and Mavis called there. 3 Churches to Hold Installation Services for New Pastor Sunday The Rev. Leonard E. Smestad of Minneapolis will be installed as the new paor in me Par River Luth- eran amsh on Sunday, August isL l-le wnl succeed the Rev. J.B. lxoekne who was in Park River for many years and is now serving a parish at Garvin, Minnesota. The installation service is  for 10:30 a. m. at Our Saviour's church and will be held in 1he main audirilun of ,rite ne church. At Golden Valley church he instaUaJdon will be a* 1 p. m., and at Pleasa Valley at 2:30. Pastor Smesad will preach at all thr svice Rev. Smestad has attended the Lutheran Bible Institute and Augs- burg College, both in Minneapolis, and is a graduate of Luther Theo- logical Seminary in St. Paul. Pre- viously he has served parishes at Pequot Lakes and at McGrath, Minnesota, and at Vienna, South Dakota. He comes to Park River from Minneapolis where he has been pastor of Nazareth Lutheran Church. While in Minneapolis he was instrumental in affecting a merger between his congregation Mrs. C. P. O'Brien Dies Wednesday Mrs. C. P. O'Brien, former Park River woman, died about 8 o'clock last evening in a Minneapolis hospi- tal following a long illness with cancer. Born in Park River August 19, 1890, Mrs. O'Brien was the former Florence Dougherty and was a sis- ter of Harold and Walter Dougherty of this city. She was the only daughter of the late Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Dougherty. She graduated from the local high school and from the North Dakota University. at Grand Forks where she was a member of the Alpha Phi sorority. On July 1, 1916, she and Mr. O'Brien were married and they lived in Park River until 1931 when they moved to Minneapolis. Mr. O'Brien was associated with the Farmers Security Bank here and later with the First State Bank af- ter the two firms merged. Survivors include the husband and five children. These are Mrs. Jack Strautz (Jeanne), Mrs. Lloyd Balcome (Nancy), Mary Ann and Pat O'Brien, all of Minneapolis, and another in order to form a new congregation comprising some over eighteen hundred members. Pastor Smestad and his wife, the former Esther Melom," are natives of North Dakota having grown up near Velva. They have five children three girls and two boys. Installation will be conducted by the Rev. T. H. Megorden of Grafton who is president of the Park. River Circuit of the Evangelical Luth- eran church. Park River Juniors Win Baseball Title Park River whilped up a two-run spurt in the last inning last night to edge Minto 4 to 3 and clinch the Walsh County Junior American Legion baseball crown. The Park River--Minto game was played at Chandler Field in Grafton as a neutral field after the two teams had met during the tournament at Minto and he first game was disallowed when Park River protested the eligibility of one of the Minto team members. Park River downed Auburn 13 to 4 in its first game and then after Park River was declared the win- ner of the game with Minto by forfeit the Park River Juniors blanked Edinburg Sunday in the finals 20 to 0. However, State Ath- letic Director Nate Cummings re- vised the decision of District Ath- letic Director Einer Wahl Tuesday night, ruling that the game must be re-played. But he upheld Park Riv- er's protest against one player, S. Brta, Minto pitcher. Park River coach Leo Englerth protested that the youth was not eligible because he had played independent ball in violation of a Junior Legion regu- lation. (He made the protest after Barta bad batted once when the score was 0-0 but Minto led 7-2 at the end of the game). Park River is scheduled to play Larimore at Minto this evening (Thursday) for the district title at 6:30. The winner then takes on MacVille at Minto Sunday in the regional playoff for the right to go to the state tournament. In the ,game at Grafton Wednes- day night Minto got the jump by scoring two runs in the first inning. Park River tallied once in the first and again in the fourth to tie the BIG 'YES' VOTE GIVEN WHEAT REFERENDUM Waish county wheat growers gave an overwhelming majority to marketing quotas for the 1955 crop, W. S. Peterka, office manager of the Agricultural and Stabilization Committee reported. The vote in the county, as com- piled by the ASC committee, found that 1,701 voted in favor of the 1 quotas and 63 were opposed. I A favorable vote of two-thirds, nationwide, is necessary to impose the quota and thus give a higher support price on wheat produced. New Lutheran Pastor Rev. Leonard E. Smestad Hospital Auxiliary Benefit Nets $300 About $300 was raised for St. Ansgar's hospital auxiliary at a benefit tea and sale held Wednes- day of last week at the home of Mrs. Karl J. Farup and Mrs. I. E. Hansen. Mrs. Jke Veum and Mrs. Fred Dencker were awarded prizes for the flower arrangements they en- tered a the flower show held in con- nection wlth the event. Mrs. M. C. Flaten of Edinburg was in charge of this feature at which plants and bulbs were sold. There was a large number of entries and the variety and color added much to the dis- plays. Food and gift items were sold and tea was served in the dining room with Mrs. F. E. Weed pouring. Piano music throughout the after- noon was provided by John C. H. Moan and Mrs. C. E. Lien. local music teachers. ] Little Worm Damage Noted Little damage by army worms in Walsh county has been noted as yet, Robert W. 2mstrup, extension , agent has stated after an inspection tour of fields in eastern and central sections of the county. While many fields have worms attacking grain foliage, the pests, except in isolated cases, ard not in sufficient numbers to cause appre- ciable damage, nor to warrant at- tempts at control by spraying, the agent believes. Some of the worst infested fields have worms at the rate of abgut i0 to the square foot, Mr. Arnstrup aid. This number, he believes, s not sufficient to greatly damage the grain. While worms may chop away parts of the leaves and even eat beards from the heads of the grain, few kernels are destroyed. Geerally, Mr. Axnstrup said, in- festation is greatest in low spots on a field where grain is lodged be- cause of dense growth. Effective spraying of such a field is difficult, as the chemical will not be able to penetrate to the bottom of the foli- age. Worms coming near the head of the grain and thus into contact with the chemical will be killed, while near the bottom, the worms will be able to continue their dep- radations. Thousands of acres in Minnesota and North Dakota have been treat- ed by chemicals where the expense I did not warrant the operation. Mr. Amstrup believes. In the county, the agent says, the average infestation of army worms may not be over one per square foot of grain. This would not be sufficient to greatly damage the maturing grain. Furthermore, Mr. Amstrup said, many of the worms are now enter- ing the pupate stage when they will go into the ground and hibernate. The worms proceed from larvae to pupate stage in about four weeks. When a worm is from one to one and one-half inches long, it is near the pupate stage. Farmers are advised by the coun- ty agent to Watch fields closely, es- pechlIy during the late evening or early morning hours when worms are feeding. If infestation appears to be over 10 worms per square foot. consideration should be given to spraying the plot. Grain is not believed to be dam- aged in so far as marketin is con- cerned, by chemical application, Mr, Amstrup said after contacting the:, NDAC entomologists by phone. If spraying is done five or six days before harvesting, it is believed there can be no reason why the grain can not immediately be put and Walter O'Brien, Kodiak, Alas- ka. Besides the two brothers in Park River there is another brother, Jack Dougherty of Waterloo, Ia. There are also 12 grandchildren. Funeral' services will be held at St. Mary's Catholic church in Park River Saturday at 10 a. m. with Roy. J. J. O'Meara officiating. Bur- ial will be in Mt. Calvary cemetery. Members of the family are ex- pected to arrive here today. Anton F. Schanllec Anton F. Schanilec, 53, native of Prarie Centre township, died un- expectedly July 19 at his home. He was born in Waish County June I0, 1901 and resided in the Prarie Centre township area his  entire life. Mr. Schanilee married Elizabeth Dusek at Vesleyville June 27. 1926. Survivors are his widow; his mo- ther, Mrs. Mary Schanflec; one son, Valarian, at home; two daughters, Mrs. James Kiedrowski (Frances) and Mrs. Leo K. Klave(Alexia), both of Minto; three brothers, John J. of Grafton. Albert J. of Minto and Louis W. of Pisek; two sisters, Mrs. Anton Dnsek of Lewistown, Mont., and Mrs. Frank Stropnicky, Grand Forks, anl one grandchild. His father died in 1951. One brother also preceded him in death. Mr. Schanilec was a member of the board of supervisors in Prarie Centre township and a member of his local school board. He was a member of St. Luke's Catholic church at Vesleyville and a member of the Knights of Columbus and the Catholic Workmen lodge. Services were conducted Thurs- ' c [ - .-  Lukes hurch Rev, . da lI1 o. V Y^r officiated. Burial was in . .... the I church cemetery. al.lOearers were: [ Louis" John aria AlDert Sch-,-d,nlec, William Suda, Frank Stropnick and Jerome Dusek. Y' score. The count stayed that way ntil th enth and f" " in Among the guests were friends u __e sev _ real mn g.l ............. in Irom FlseK LanKln Edlnourg, Aci- M to scored when Llzakowskl ' ' .. drew a walk sole QeoAnA s, *hn I ares and Grafton, as well as many went the rest of th _ [from Park River The Grafto e way on a . aoub] hv D v+, Dv w;,,,- women presented a bolt of outing r-Ili 'b" hn'-" n+'h" -m flannel to the auxiliary for hospital frame-when-Bin'g'L'arsonsmas%e-'d ]use' Mrs. M. B. Overbye, auxiliary a line drive into center field that uresident, expressed appreciation was good for two bases. David Flint walked. Tony Leonard rapped out a double that brought Larson in for the first run and Ronnie Berger popped the ball into short right field to score Flint and ice the game. Larson and Dvorak were the win- nine, battery. D. Shelley was on the mound for Minto while O'Connell was behind the plate. FARM FATALITIES SEEN' "IN NORTH DAKOTA While safety practices need more general acceptance in order to pre- vent the needless toll of lives taken by farm accidents each year, pro- gress is being made in North Da- kota toward safer farms and homes This is pointed out by John Zayl- skie, forester and farm safety spe- cialist of NDAC Extension service. He cites North Dakota State Health department figures to show that fatal accidents on farms were re- duced almost 50%, comparing 1943 with I953. Forty fatal farm accidents occur- red in 1943. compared with 24 in 1953. Actually, fatal accidents have been high in number in the past 10 years, but a trend downward is ap- parent. Zaylskie urges frm people to make Farm Safety Week. now be- ing observed, a starting point to- ward safer practices. Power ma- chines, especially tractors, are in- volved in most fatalities in North Dakota. He suggests that attention be given immediaitely to safety rules in the handling of such equip- ment. for this gesture of good will and thanked Mrs. Farup and Mrs. Han- sen for offering their home for this community project. She also ex-] pressed gratitude to all who help- ed in any way to make- the event such a success. County Bond Sale Totals S12,14,812 A iota] of $12,142,812 of Series E and H bonds were purchased by North Dakotans the first six months of 1954, or 19% more than the $10.- 225.563 purchased during the first half of 1953. according to County Savings Bonds Chairman Gordon S. Larson of Park River. "Sales for the state, during the month of June. amounted to $1,790,- 418. 25 more than June sales last year, and is $158.519 better than last month's $1,631,899," Mr. Larson said. He further added. "Walsh countY sold $69.602 of Series E and H Sv- ins bonds during the month Of June this year which brings the total of sales of these two issues to $396,061 for the first six months of 1954. This figure compares to the first half of 1953 and is more than a 20% improvement in the purchase of these bonds 'in the county. ,'Nationally," Mr. Larson conclud- ed, "purchases of Series E and H on the market. QuRe a number of fields in the county have been sprayed for army worm control, Mr. Amstrup said. He cautioned farmers not to get "panicky" about the infestation but to study apparent damage careful- ly before incurring the expense of spraying. Baseball Season Concluded Sunday Grafton and Veseleyville came through with victories in the Walsh County baseball league Sunday to tie for the lead in the eastern div- ision. The schedule ended Sunday. ConwayFordville won the wes- tern diviison title Sunday by beat- ing Park River 11 to 8. Conway. Fordvi]le will now play the win- ner of the Grafton-Veseleyville play-off in the best two out of three series for the league cham- pionship. Ron Lunde pitched one-hit ball Sunday as Grafton came through with a 5 to 0 victory over Warsaw in a game played at Chandler field in Grafton. Wilson and Halliday pitched for Warsaw. Bob Evenson pitched three-hit ball for Nash Sunday but his team- mates fielding support left some- thing required and Veseleyville came through with an 8 to 1 vic- tory. Evenson struck out 17 Vese- leyville batters but Nash commit- ted a total of eight errors during the game. Ernie Schanilec hurled for Veseleyville and permitted four hits. His team made one error. Ole Omdahl hurled Conway-Ford- savins bonds during the first six ville to its victory over Park River. months of 1954 amounted to $2.516.- Merle Onstad was on the mound for 000.000, the best sales record for the Park River. first half of any year since 1945'. is 13% above the same period of last PARK RIVER MARKET Durum $3.45: Wheat 2.16: Oats .55; year:of twoandyearsiS ago."44% better than that 1 Barley $1.25", Flax $3.27. A CE 00HURSDAY, JULY, Thursday, Aug.5 American Legion Coliseum ! MusiebyPrestonL00e Music by l)ei.Clayto...}