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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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July 26, 1956     Walsh County Press
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July 26, 1956
 

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at the moment Some are fastened to the corners of buildings high above the sidewalk and others may be on lamp posts on the corner of the street. Some have such long hoods shading the lights it is hard to see whether you are to stop or go. Speaking of traffic lights, makes me think of something that hap- pened to me on June 18 of this year. I was driving into the airport at Grand Forks about 10 p. m. anx- ious to meet an incoming plane bearing some mighty precious car- go, and in the excitment of antici- pation I forgot to dim the car's headlights. I was suddenly brought back to earth by a screaming siren and a flashing red turbine light as a highway patrolman drew up be- side my car. He took down my per- sonal history and pointed out that I was guilty of a dangerous infrac- tion of the traffic laws of the state. He also said this offense would be made a part of my permanent: driving record in Bismarck. This made me sad, indeed, but I com- plimented the fellow for being on the alert and for checking me up, which I deserved to be. Today I re- ceived notice from Clark J. Mon- roe, State superintendent of the highway patrol in Bismarck that the patrolman had done as he said he would. In another week or so I expect to drive to Chicago and I have quite a few misgivings about the coming experience, but one thing, I'm sure of, I may not know how their street traffic lights operate, but I've made myself mighty fam- iliar with the dimmer pedal on my car, and I intend to use it. I've definitely seen the light. R Adams News green light and when to go into action. Apparently there is no end to the things that can be dreamed up to confuse pedestrians and mo- torists when it comes to the use of red and green lights. In Fargo on, Monday, I was thrown off balance, even though I wasn't driving the car, by an arrow indicating that it !was O K to turn right on a red light. And, no wonder, when the arrow flashed on in the center of a green light that came on while the red one was ordering traffic to halt. I don't get it. Odd things happen all the time of course, but Monday afternoon while waiting for a light to turn from red to green, I was surprised as anythingto have the driver of the car next to us, call out my name in a real fri?ndly manner. Here it turned out to be a man who farms near Sheldon, N. D., whom I hadn't seen for two years or more. We exchanged greetings and then the light changed and we were lost in the traffic. Probaby I won't see him again for umpteen i years. Who knows? On the way to Fargo a signal light on highway 81 at Hillsboro also throws me for a loss. It has a sign under it saying "stop before turning right on red." It seems to me that admonition should not be altogether necessary. If other mo- torists are like me, their first in- stinct ought to be to stop dead still the second a red light comes into sight and this should be doubly true if a sharp turn has to be ne- gotiated. There's no harm in warn- ing drivers, of course, and I am mighty glad those stop signs are in general use. Yet, that brings to mind another feature about sema- phores, as traffic lights are called, that irks me. Why in the world can't they be uniformly placed? In the early days of their use, the lights were on a post in the middle of a street in- tersection and operated much the same as a traffic cop does. But, in the name 6f progress or something, this system was changed. Probably the posts were considered hazards, anyway now you can look any old place for the stop & go lights and be apt to find them. The ones that are suspended over head and dangle from guy wires in the mid- dle of the intersection are in the poorest location of all. You have to crane your neck out the window r, ometimes to see them and if you happen to be facing the sun, it is hard to tell what color is showing Sis of our Times . . . Or may- be they aren't considered signs, but my gripe this week has to do with stop and go lights that regulate the flow of traffic in various places. Certainly I realize that they are Very necessary and since the number of vehicles on the road is constantly increasing, traffic sure- ly would be in a snarl without some means of regulating it. How- ever, it seems to me that these important little lights ought to be operated uniformly all over the country. But they don't seem to be. When I get into a bigger town, the ordinary red and green lights meaning stop and go, don't foul me up, but it's the variations on them that throw me or a loss and make me and my vehicle a definite traffic hazard. For instance, when I was in Bis- marck recently I all but took my life in my own hands wheri I tried on foot to cross one of their busier thoroughfares. This was because a new tangled traffic light system is being tried out in that section of the city and I didn't know how it operated. Being used to walking leisurely across the street when a ,,green light flashed on, I still don't know what pedestrians are sup- POsed to do when a red light is on and suddenly right below it a green one with the word WAIT in the center, comes on. What to do? Being a country jake and Inexper- ienced in things like new traffic installations, I started walking to the other side of the street when the green light came on. What hmppened? Everybody around stay- ed put on the edge of the side- Walk and cars kept sailing through honking their horns at me. In due time the lower light went out and the red light above turned to green, also showing the word WALK in big letters, which every- one did but me, because I had al- ready managed a perilous crossing to the other side where I wanted to be. Thank goodness, this type of traffic regulation was in use only on that one corner and I discover- ed it before I had occasion to ' drive my car into such a confusing set-up. A fellow, who undoubtedly noted that I was a green horn, told me this was a fandangle from California that is being tried out as an experiment in our capital city. Maybe the Californians can oper- ate satisfactorily with such a sys- tem, but I'm certain North Dako- tans are going to need some educa- tion on when to Wait on a red- "Outdoor Cookin'" July 26 27 28 By Mrs. Lena Nordbye Mrs. Karin Nilson, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Stark from Esksharad, Swed- en and Mr. and Mrs. Stromgren of Duluth were guests of Mrs. Julia Norquist and Mr. and Mrs. William Dahlgren from Thursday until Sat- urday. Mrs. Thorn Kjelaas visited Mrs. Dahlgren Thursday evening. Other visitors during the week were Mesdames Peder Hilde, Lofthus, E. Hedlund, Norquist and Nordbye. The Adams Livewires Jr., 4-H club met at the home of Larry Borchgrevink July 17 with five members present. A calf-washing demonstrationg was given and a lesson on tractor care and safety was read. The 4-H tour is planned for August 5. Lunch was served. Janet Olson and Randy Skorheim were visitors present. The next meeting will be held at the home of Jackie Johron. Mrs. I. Midthlyng went to La- kota Monday to meet Mrs. Cora Westburg who came up from South Dakota to spend some time FRESH FROZEN FOOD Birds Eye 6-oz can ORANGE JUICE ................ 2 for 43c Sea Mist 12-oz can WHITE LEMONADE ............ 2 for 49c North State 10 oz pkg. CUT CORN .................... 2 for 35c Swanson's 8-oz BEEF POT PIES ................ 2 for 57c MEATS PORK ROAST ................... lb. 43c PORK STEAK ................... lb. 43c GROUND BEEF .............. 3 Ibs $1.00 RING BOLOGNA ................ lb. 42c Fruits & Vegetables Ma Brown 12-oz Jar GRAPE JAM ................. 5 for $I.00 KETCHUP, Heinz, 14-oz bottle ........ 19c Libby 14-oz can PORK & BEANS ................ 4 for 49c Libby 303 can FRUIT COCKTAIL ............ 4 for $1.00 Libby No. 3 Seive 303 can EARLY JUNE PEAS ............ 3 for 49c Treet 12 oz can LONCHEON MEAT ................. 35 Good Value 32-oz jar SALAD DRESSING . each 43c Ocean Spray Strained 300 can CRANBERRY SAUCE ........... 2 for 39 Joan of Arc 300 can KIDNEY BEANS ............... 2 for 29 Cream or Whole 303 can FESTAL CORN ................ 2 for 35c Happy Host 303 can CUT GREEN BEANS ............ 2 for 29c Happy Host 303 can TOMATOES ................... 2 for 33c VET'S DOG FOOD, 16 oz can .... 6 fer 57 Vermont Maid 12 oz bottle CANE & MAPLE SYRUP ......... each 32c Duncan Hines 18-oz Pkg. BUTTERMILK PANCAKE MIX ........ 19 'WE BUY EGGS GREEN APPLES ............... 2 Ibs 39 BING CHERRIES ............... 2 Ibs 69c NEW POTATOES ............ 10 Ibs $1.09 GREEN PEPPERS ...... Ib 39c WE GIVE $ & H GREEN STAMPS PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA visiting here. The Adams Willing Workers 4-H club met July 11 at the Legion hall with Leah Rae Boe presiding. Barbara Swenson led the recre- ation Diane McLean demonstrated how to make cherry pie. Mrs. Gladys Overland served lunch. The Willing Workers spent July 20th in Grand Forks where they toured the meat packing plant and had a picnic in Riverside park. They had supper at the Bronze Boot care in Grand Forks and stopped in Grafton to see a movie before coming home. Mr. and Mrs. Silas Bjorg and son, Allen, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Bjorg autoed to Devils Lake Sunday to attend the water carnival at Lake- wood park. The Naomi circle met at the home of Mrs. Rodger Boe. Mrs. O. T. Haugen gave the Bible study. Lunch was served by the hostess. Mr and Mrs. Herbert Midtlyng of Grand Forks, Mr. and Mrs. Rag- LOCKERS GROCERIES THURSDAY, er Gustafson, Mr. find Mrs. Fred Sukstorf and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. John Hefta, Mr. and Mrs. Donnelly Hosna and baby were Sunday visitors at the Ingebrit Midtlyng home. Mr. and Mrs. Homer_ Midtlyng spent Saturday and unday in Battle Lake and Fargo. The Ruth Circle met the Ells- worth Grove home Tuesday. Visi- tors were Mrs. O. T. Haagen, who gave the Bible lesson. Mrs. Loft- hus, Mrs. Clara Wallgren, Mrs. C. Grcve, Mrs. Loft and Mrs. Nord- bye. Mr. and Mrs. Memford Nelson of Moorhead visited at the Oscar Lundquist home recently. Mrs. Clara Wallgren, Douglas Grove and Clarion Lien went to Crookston by bus from Grafton on July 14. Mr. and Mrs. Tilford Grove drove down Sunday to bring Adam_s with relatives. Mr. and Mrs Clifford and family of Grafton day with Mr. (] Mr. and Mrs. John Mr. and Mrs. Bill Park River called on MrR. and at the Otto Dvorak nesday. Mrs. Howard Wade, Mrs. Amelia John Erickson were guests of Mrs. Otto day afternoon. The two sons of Mr. Neff Samuelson are week with their and Mrs. Adolph Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ru GlenburnrN'ers 1VI D. and the [siste , s. James McG ' [nie Rutledge) and Mrs. Grieve of Hannah, were them home. er visitors Monday. A The Ray Skorheim family have lcal resident, Mr. Rutledge returned to Minot after visiting in I been back for 44 years. a complete home trucked to your lot from Canada] u u - --  u ...delivered anywhere in North Dakota l 3-bedroom ,4,800 0 F.O.B. MORDEN, MANITOBA r- i i i B F. OI1OO ' BEDoA OErl '; g'Ox 1.3 e 4Y'GX I 1#'"' F,I 0 ! H Dlmna l e le O11 LIIW$ r OIn J ii, 2 . II,  v ' L._ i | L o,ion C-J 40-O 2-bedroom ,3,875 oo F.O.B. MORDEN, MANITOBA ! l- 9'-Ox IO,-G 9'.O x IO'.G z on *-.  c I LIVinG ...... J Expertly built by the MONARCH LUMBER COMPANY (serving Western Canada for more than 50 years) PRE-BUILT HOMES, COMPLETELY CON- STRUCTED IN OUR YARD AT MORDEN, MANITOBA, AND TRUCKED COMPLETE TO YOUR LOT AND SET ON YOUR BASE- MENT (BASEMENT PLANS PROVIDED). BUILT TO F.H.A. STANDARDS AND N.H.A. STANDARDS (NATIONAL HOUSING ACT OF CANADA). THESE ARE NOT PRE-FAB HOMES. If you're planning a home, this is a practical Cana- dian idea you shouldn't miss. For more informa- tion, write or phone. Better still, drive up and see these attractive homes on display ir our yard. Talk it over with our Mr. Jim Baillle, Morden, Mani- toba. Good roods all the way! We will also build a home to YOUR plans and specifications. You Provide: Lot, Basement, Plumbing and Heating, plus trucking and duty charges. We ship a complete home as illustrated, solidly built of quality materials and featuring:  in. drywall construction (Stonebord wallboard with a fire proof gypsum core that will nat shrink or expand, and finishes beautifully (paint or wallpaper)- Attractive, roomy kitchen cabinets. Fully wired, with fixtures Fully insulated Weiser Door Hardware Cedar Bungalow Siding Painted Exterior 210-1b. Asphalt Shingles. MANITOBA - TELEPHONE No. 3 - MANAGER: JIM BAli.UE o at the moment Some are fastened to the corners of buildings high above the sidewalk and others may be on lamp posts on the corner of the street. Some have such long hoods shading the lights it is hard to see whether you are to stop or go. Speaking of traffic lights, makes me think of something that hap- pened to me on June 18 of this year. I was driving into the airport at Grand Forks about 10 p. m. anx- ious to meet an incoming plane bearing some mighty precious car- go, and in the excitment of antici- pation I forgot to dim the car's headlights. I was suddenly brought back to earth by a screaming siren and a flashing red turbine light as a highway patrolman drew up be- side my car. He took down my per- sonal history and pointed out that I was guilty of a dangerous infrac- tion of the traffic laws of the state. He also said this offense would be made a part of my permanent: driving record in Bismarck. This made me sad, indeed, but I com- plimented the fellow for being on the alert and for checking me up, which I deserved to be. Today I re- ceived notice from Clark J. Mon- roe, State superintendent of the highway patrol in Bismarck that the patrolman had done as he said he would. In another week or so I expect to drive to Chicago and I have quite a few misgivings about the coming experience, but one thing, I'm sure of, I may not know how their street traffic lights operate, but I've made myself mighty fam- iliar with the dimmer pedal on my car, and I intend to use it. I've definitely seen the light. R Adams News green light and when to go into action. Apparently there is no end to the things that can be dreamed up to confuse pedestrians and mo- torists when it comes to the use of red and green lights. In Fargo on, Monday, I was thrown off balance, even though I wasn't driving the car, by an arrow indicating that it !was O K to turn right on a red light. And, no wonder, when the arrow flashed on in the center of a green light that came on while the red one was ordering traffic to halt. I don't get it. Odd things happen all the time of course, but Monday afternoon while waiting for a light to turn from red to green, I was surprised as anythingto have the driver of the car next to us, call out my name in a real fri?ndly manner. Here it turned out to be a man who farms near Sheldon, N. D., whom I hadn't seen for two years or more. We exchanged greetings and then the light changed and we were lost in the traffic. Probaby I won't see him again for umpteen i years. Who knows? On the way to Fargo a signal light on highway 81 at Hillsboro also throws me for a loss. It has a sign under it saying "stop before turning right on red." It seems to me that admonition should not be altogether necessary. If other mo- torists are like me, their first in- stinct ought to be to stop dead still the second a red light comes into sight and this should be doubly true if a sharp turn has to be ne- gotiated. There's no harm in warn- ing drivers, of course, and I am mighty glad those stop signs are in general use. Yet, that brings to mind another feature about sema- phores, as traffic lights are called, that irks me. Why in the world can't they be uniformly placed? In the early days of their use, the lights were on a post in the middle of a street in- tersection and operated much the same as a traffic cop does. But, in the name 6f progress or something, this system was changed. Probably the posts were considered hazards, anyway now you can look any old place for the stop & go lights and be apt to find them. The ones that are suspended over head and dangle from guy wires in the mid- dle of the intersection are in the poorest location of all. You have to crane your neck out the window r, ometimes to see them and if you happen to be facing the sun, it is hard to tell what color is showing Sis of our Times . . . Or may- be they aren't considered signs, but my gripe this week has to do with stop and go lights that regulate the flow of traffic in various places. Certainly I realize that they are Very necessary and since the number of vehicles on the road is constantly increasing, traffic sure- ly would be in a snarl without some means of regulating it. How- ever, it seems to me that these important little lights ought to be operated uniformly all over the country. But they don't seem to be. When I get into a bigger town, the ordinary red and green lights meaning stop and go, don't foul me up, but it's the variations on them that throw me or a loss and make me and my vehicle a definite traffic hazard. For instance, when I was in Bis- marck recently I all but took my life in my own hands wheri I tried on foot to cross one of their busier thoroughfares. This was because a new tangled traffic light system is being tried out in that section of the city and I didn't know how it operated. Being used to walking leisurely across the street when a ,,green light flashed on, I still don't know what pedestrians are sup- POsed to do when a red light is on and suddenly right below it a green one with the word WAIT in the center, comes on. What to do? Being a country jake and Inexper- ienced in things like new traffic installations, I started walking to the other side of the street when the green light came on. What hmppened? Everybody around stay- ed put on the edge of the side- Walk and cars kept sailing through honking their horns at me. In due time the lower light went out and the red light above turned to green, also showing the word WALK in big letters, which every- one did but me, because I had al- ready managed a perilous crossing to the other side where I wanted to be. Thank goodness, this type of traffic regulation was in use only on that one corner and I discover- ed it before I had occasion to ' drive my car into such a confusing set-up. A fellow, who undoubtedly noted that I was a green horn, told me this was a fandangle from California that is being tried out as an experiment in our capital city. Maybe the Californians can oper- ate satisfactorily with such a sys- tem, but I'm certain North Dako- tans are going to need some educa- tion on when to Wait on a red- "Outdoor Cookin'" July 26 27 28 By Mrs. Lena Nordbye Mrs. Karin Nilson, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Stark from Esksharad, Swed- en and Mr. and Mrs. Stromgren of Duluth were guests of Mrs. Julia Norquist and Mr. and Mrs. William Dahlgren from Thursday until Sat- urday. Mrs. Thorn Kjelaas visited Mrs. Dahlgren Thursday evening. Other visitors during the week were Mesdames Peder Hilde, Lofthus, E. Hedlund, Norquist and Nordbye. The Adams Livewires Jr., 4-H club met at the home of Larry Borchgrevink July 17 with five members present. A calf-washing demonstrationg was given and a lesson on tractor care and safety was read. The 4-H tour is planned for August 5. Lunch was served. Janet Olson and Randy Skorheim were visitors present. The next meeting will be held at the home of Jackie Johron. Mrs. I. Midthlyng went to La- kota Monday to meet Mrs. Cora Westburg who came up from South Dakota to spend some time FRESH FROZEN FOOD Birds Eye 6-oz can ORANGE JUICE ................ 2 for 43c Sea Mist 12-oz can WHITE LEMONADE ............ 2 for 49c North State 10 oz pkg. CUT CORN .................... 2 for 35c Swanson's 8-oz BEEF POT PIES ................ 2 for 57c MEATS PORK ROAST ................... lb. 43c PORK STEAK ................... lb. 43c GROUND BEEF .............. 3 Ibs $1.00 RING BOLOGNA ................ lb. 42c Fruits & Vegetables Ma Brown 12-oz Jar GRAPE JAM ................. 5 for $I.00 KETCHUP, Heinz, 14-oz bottle ........ 19c Libby 14-oz can PORK & BEANS ................ 4 for 49c Libby 303 can FRUIT COCKTAIL ............ 4 for $1.00 Libby No. 3 Seive 303 can EARLY JUNE PEAS ............ 3 for 49c Treet 12 oz can LONCHEON MEAT ................. 35 Good Value 32-oz jar SALAD DRESSING . each 43c Ocean Spray Strained 300 can CRANBERRY SAUCE ........... 2 for 39 Joan of Arc 300 can KIDNEY BEANS ............... 2 for 29 Cream or Whole 303 can FESTAL CORN ................ 2 for 35c Happy Host 303 can CUT GREEN BEANS ............ 2 for 29c Happy Host 303 can TOMATOES ................... 2 for 33c VET'S DOG FOOD, 16 oz can .... 6 fer 57 Vermont Maid 12 oz bottle CANE & MAPLE SYRUP ......... each 32c Duncan Hines 18-oz Pkg. BUTTERMILK PANCAKE MIX ........ 19 'WE BUY EGGS GREEN APPLES ............... 2 Ibs 39 BING CHERRIES ............... 2 Ibs 69c NEW POTATOES ............ 10 Ibs $1.09 GREEN PEPPERS ...... Ib 39c WE GIVE $ & H GREEN STAMPS PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA visiting here. The Adams Willing Workers 4-H club met July 11 at the Legion hall with Leah Rae Boe presiding. Barbara Swenson led the recre- ation Diane McLean demonstrated how to make cherry pie. Mrs. Gladys Overland served lunch. The Willing Workers spent July 20th in Grand Forks where they toured the meat packing plant and had a picnic in Riverside park. They had supper at the Bronze Boot care in Grand Forks and stopped in Grafton to see a movie before coming home. Mr. and Mrs. Silas Bjorg and son, Allen, Mr. and Mrs. Clayton Bjorg autoed to Devils Lake Sunday to attend the water carnival at Lake- wood park. The Naomi circle met at the home of Mrs. Rodger Boe. Mrs. O. T. Haugen gave the Bible study. Lunch was served by the hostess. Mr and Mrs. Herbert Midtlyng of Grand Forks, Mr. and Mrs. Rag- LOCKERS GROCERIES THURSDAY, er Gustafson, Mr. find Mrs. Fred Sukstorf and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. John Hefta, Mr. and Mrs. Donnelly Hosna and baby were Sunday visitors at the Ingebrit Midtlyng home. Mr. and Mrs. Homer_ Midtlyng spent Saturday and unday in Battle Lake and Fargo. The Ruth Circle met the Ells- worth Grove home Tuesday. Visi- tors were Mrs. O. T. Haagen, who gave the Bible lesson. Mrs. Loft- hus, Mrs. Clara Wallgren, Mrs. C. Grcve, Mrs. Loft and Mrs. Nord- bye. Mr. and Mrs. Memford Nelson of Moorhead visited at the Oscar Lundquist home recently. Mrs. Clara Wallgren, Douglas Grove and Clarion Lien went to Crookston by bus from Grafton on July 14. Mr. and Mrs. Tilford Grove drove down Sunday to bring Adam_s with relatives. Mr. and Mrs Clifford and family of Grafton day with Mr. (] Mr. and Mrs. John Mr. and Mrs. Bill Park River called on MrR. and at the Otto Dvorak nesday. Mrs. Howard Wade, Mrs. Amelia John Erickson were guests of Mrs. Otto day afternoon. The two sons of Mr. Neff Samuelson are week with their and Mrs. Adolph Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ru GlenburnrN'ers 1VI D. and the [siste , s. James McG ' [nie Rutledge) and Mrs. Grieve of Hannah, were them home. er visitors Monday. A The Ray Skorheim family have lcal resident, Mr. Rutledge returned to Minot after visiting in I been back for 44 years. a complete home trucked to your lot from Canada] u u - --  u ...delivered anywhere in North Dakota l 3-bedroom ,4,800 0 F.O.B. MORDEN, MANITOBA r- i i i B F. OI1OO ' BEDoA OErl '; g'Ox 1.3 e 4Y'GX I 1#'"' F,I 0 ! H Dlmna l e le O11 LIIW$ r OIn J ii, 2 . II,  v ' L._ i | L o,ion C-J 40-O 2-bedroom ,3,875 oo F.O.B. MORDEN, MANITOBA ! l- 9'-Ox IO,-G 9'.O x IO'.G z on *-.  c I LIVinG ...... J Expertly built by the MONARCH LUMBER COMPANY (serving Western Canada for more than 50 years) PRE-BUILT HOMES, COMPLETELY CON- STRUCTED IN OUR YARD AT MORDEN, MANITOBA, AND TRUCKED COMPLETE TO YOUR LOT AND SET ON YOUR BASE- MENT (BASEMENT PLANS PROVIDED). BUILT TO F.H.A. STANDARDS AND N.H.A. STANDARDS (NATIONAL HOUSING ACT OF CANADA). THESE ARE NOT PRE-FAB HOMES. If you're planning a home, this is a practical Cana- dian idea you shouldn't miss. For more informa- tion, write or phone. Better still, drive up and see these attractive homes on display ir our yard. Talk it over with our Mr. Jim Baillle, Morden, Mani- toba. Good roods all the way! We will also build a home to YOUR plans and specifications. You Provide: Lot, Basement, Plumbing and Heating, plus trucking and duty charges. We ship a complete home as illustrated, solidly built of quality materials and featuring:  in. drywall construction (Stonebord wallboard with a fire proof gypsum core that will nat shrink or expand, and finishes beautifully (paint or wallpaper)- Attractive, roomy kitchen cabinets. Fully wired, with fixtures Fully insulated Weiser Door Hardware Cedar Bungalow Siding Painted Exterior 210-1b. Asphalt Shingles. MANITOBA - TELEPHONE No. 3 - MANAGER: JIM BAli.UE o