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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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July 26, 1956     Walsh County Press
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July 26, 1956
 

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PAGE TWO PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, JULY 26, Actually, I don&apos;t know how to start this column, for what I un- covered a coupla days ago is so darn far-fetched that I'm liable to get a berth in the hospital at Jamestown if I put it in writing. But here goes nothing... bwk Now, I know that you folks have heard of pink elephants, flying horses, mermaids, talking dogs and such, and I wouldn't even be sur- prised if some of you had run across some of these critters at one time or another. But, I'm doggone sure that none of you have been introduced yet to a talking mailbox. Yep, you heard me . . . an honest-to-goodness hunk of tin with vocal chords. hwk Stay wit me readers, and rll explain te latest combination to hit the large city street corners since fire hydrants and stray dogs . . the mailbox with a voice. Now, X'm aware as the next fella of how Postmaster General Summerfield is attempting to jack up the postal department. So far, he's made more changes than a new mother with a two-weeks-old kid. I been noticing such remark- able innovations as new light- weight ballpoint pens in place of the old fashioned scratchy kind, and in large metropolis's such as Grafton they even got some pulse- quickening red, white and blue mailboxes to replace those khaki colored oldtimers. Also, they tell me that a lot of the country's let- ter carriers now go on their ap- pointed rounds looking like hotel bellhops in their maroon striped pants and ties. hwk Well, I've strung along with Summerfield in hopes that the law of averages would hit him on the noodle and get him hustling on the. raeal problem--slow mail de- liveries. About the only difference I can detect, however, since they started these new tangled ideas. that instead of just coming late s before, the mail arrives late now in circus colored trucks. hwk To get back to the talking mail- box . . . I like the old fashioned one fine just the way it is. The only complaint ] got is that the colleetion"alwayb seems to take place five minutes before I get there with an important letter, and sometimes it takes an awful lot of time for the letter to get from the mail box to the recipient. Otherwise, me and the old style models used, to get along swell. In fact, until this latest bit of news came out, they've been my favorite partners in conversation. They and walls. I always kind of figured a guy could unload his woes on them without the bank, neighbors, or wife getting wind of it. But mow comes the word that the new mail boxes can indulge in two-way confabs with thefr customers. From now on I'm going to keep my trap shut around them. I'll just talk to walls. Actually, I guess its still in the :experimental stage, but by that I imagine they mean that the alum- inum Frankenstein can only carry on a conversation in one lang- uage. First thing ya know, the dad- blamed things will be striking up a conversation with a gent about .yesterday's ballgame while he is waiting on the corner for his mis- sus. And the second thing you know, you'll wind up betting against the Yankees, or maybe miss the wife. Or you dash up to mail a letter and the box says smugly, "The next collection will be at 7 P. M. tomorrow. Better trot down to the main post office, you dope." hwk I imagine there ain't a blamed :thing I can do about the situation, but it sure paints a gloomy out- ]ook for the near future. It is only a question of time, from what I hear, until everything else will be Pvetty much in the same boat. The gents with the brains got a fancy name for thi$ new era that we are entering  'automationism.' I only holm that some of, these science fiction writers aren t right, for I've read a couple stories where the machines suddenly got emotional & took over the world. I'm pretty rttre that'd never happen, you un- derstand, especially if you keep a limit on the number. Still. they tell me those were the famous last Words uttered, when they put the float rabbit in Australia. You people probably think that rm making this malarkey up, but it's the truth. Why, I even read that someplace_ over. in Germany ff rd drop a coupla mark= in a matr, a little card po L out, tucin you to a lady or tn in matrimony. Guess t also furnishes a description ot eyes, hair, disposition and :finances. By go, I' almost wager that m0re information is psented on that little card than some people took time to find out when the were in the market for a spou, I've seen some duets that  together about as well as taffy and false teeth. In fact, I might go as far as to recommend that they put them marriage vending mach- ines up all over. I figure it would save a lot of folks from wasting unnecessary time and money, not to mention a few broken hearts. It kinda makes me sad to think of all the foolish women who have squandered their time trying to snare such cagey bachelors as Dr. R. W. Baldwin, Glen Engh,Gummy Rtliff, this city, and Louie Whelan, St. Thomas. Now, if they just had one of those vending Home00 EcTeacher Has Language DiffiCulties in German Dialects Miss Virginia Falter, former I "In the class for younger cnil- Home Economics teacher in Park ldren they sang several songs for River, writes another letter from lme and then went on with their Germany where she is spending I studies. The second class was read- the summer. / ing the story of the country mouse are crossed. He'll probably boot you off the premises and give the loot to the burglar. I'm even afraid they'll mess around with Thanksgiving too. Soon you'll be dropping your mon- ey in a slot and steely voice will reply, "Light or dark meat, please?" hwk Yup, at the rate she's going, there'll come a day when you are plunked in a chair by a mechani- cal waiter. You eat the mechanical meal. You wait for the mechanical hatcheck to return your derby. And, when nobody's looking, you slip a thin dime into the tip slot. And the mechanical voice whis- pers, "Cheapskate." That's it folks. Looks like the machines are here to stay. "I am really having doubts about how well I will ever speak the German language. It gets more confusing all the time. On Friday I finally learned the correct high German word for 'home' It is "Hime." However, here in Grosnie- dershein, the dialect is "hame" and in Klienniedersheim (2 kilometers, or 1.2 miles away) the word is "home." In Klienneidersheim they also say 'no' for "no,' not "nay" as they do in Grosniedersheim, or nein, which is high German. machines to consult! "By the way, Grosniedersheim Otherwise though, I can't see I means big niedersheim; Klein much good in these walking means small and 2 kilos in the oth- switchboards. Can you argue with er direction is by-niedersheim. All a mechanical salesman? Can you lthese villages axe about 750 years pinch a mechanical waitress? And, I ld" when fh= fire,= om.o , A;I o ] 'The past week has been rather ............................ busy. One morning I made black mechanical cop, suppose his wires cherry jam. Here they melt the Resolution of Sympathy ] WHEREAS, the Divine Creator I has, in His infinite Wisdom, seen I fit to remove from this life one of I highly valued members of the Park River Fire Department, WALTER L. DOUGHERTY THEREFORE BE IT RESOLV- ED, That the Park River Fire De- partment does hereby express sin- care regret at his passing and ex- tends sincere and heartfelt sym- pathy to the surviving members of sugar, add the fruit pulp and boil for five minutes. The jars are ster- ilized by burning sulphur paper under them and sealed with cello- phane. I also ironed one morning with an electric iron but on a flare table. I never realized before how difficult a skirt and blouse could be to iron. That afternoon we pick- ed the cherries from the last tree. We all ate plenty. Then we pruned and tied up grapevines. It was so cold here last winter that almost all grapevines in this vicinity were killed. They come back from the roots but this year there is all the work and no grapes. Working with those low grapevines is harder on the back of the legs than setting up exercises. "Thursday I paid a visit to the local school (Folkschule) which is like our elementary school. There are two teachers, each with four classes. With the older children. I was the geography lesson for the day. They had seen movies about America in school and wanted to check on the facts. Does the mail really come by auto to a box on the farms? Do you have cowboys with guns in North Dakota? How did you get to Germany? What route did you take? Do all girls in America wear short hair or do some have braids? Do you really eat bacon & eggs for breakfast? (Here breakfast consists of bread, butter, jam and coffee with milk.} Of course I had trouble under- standing and speaking but all spoke slowly for my benefit. Fre- quently we had to draw pictures and the city mouse. The first class had a short story about a mouse and cat. I happened to be sitting near the door when it was time for dismissal and had to shake hands and say Goodbye to all 30 of them. They must have run home to tell Angela (the four-year-old in the family) I was in school because at lunch it was reported that they had said, "Angela's fraulein was in school and spoke very good Ger- man." I can say "auf weidersehen" (goodbye} quite well. "Tomorrow I am going with the school by omnibus for a tour of Pfaltz (the state). "Here in Germany the children have only 8 weeks vacationtwo weeks in the fall and six in sum- mer. They have school all day in winter but in summer only until noon. starting at 7 a. m. "Yesterday I went to church. There were about 40 people pres- ent, mostly older women and young children. There were only five men in church, besides the I mstor and the organist. The church s supported by a tax which has recently been raised from 8% to 10%. In Grosniededsheim, after the war. to replace the bells, the women of the church did have a cake sale where they also served lunch. 'Trau Webel. my host, is about 28 or 30 years old and is a very up to date home maker. She attended the farm wife school and took her master briefing, which would be about equivalent to having a college degree in home economics. After attending school, she had to work on another farm for a period of time doing all phases of work-- cooking, sewing, child care, garden- ing, field work etc. She also has had several of these girl appren- tices in her home. "Her husband, about 30 or 35, was a prisoner of war with the Russians for three years. He has spoken of it very little except to say he was bent over like an old man when he came home and that there was never enough to eat. I have met other prisoners of war, too. Some have been American prisoners and some were held by the Soviets. Last night we visited Frau Webel's cousin, whose hus- band had been an American pris- oner of war I talked also with a man who had been in Missouri and I STRICTLY BUSINESS W DAHLS RETURN FROM Federated Clubs VACATION TRIP TO COAST Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Dahl and Plan District Meel their son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Dahl. returned on Wednesday from a two weeks' va- cation trip that took them to the west coast. On the way out they stopped at Libby, Mont., to visit the Ben Ar- ness family, formerly of Park River and toured Glacier National park and Grand Coulee dam. said to be the largest dam in the world. At Puyallup, Wash., they called on Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hot/is, the latter being a niece of Mrs. Theo. Dahl. Going on to British Columbia. the Park Riverites stopped to see Roy Gillespies at Vancouver and at the Alex Gillespie home in Langley. Traveling south along the coast. they did some sight seeing in San Francisco and came home by way of Yellowstone National park and the Garrison dam in North Dakota. In Garrison they called on Mr. and Mrs. Miles Vreeland. Scratch pads, 20c a pound, at The Press office, tf At Langd0n The First District of the Federst" ed clubs will hold the annoal di trict meeting at Langdon Frid' August 31, with the Langon W0 an's club as hostess. Mrs. Harry O'Brien of Park er, district president, and Mrs. " D. Uglem, Northwood district retary, will meet Saturday,  28, with the Langdon club to r plans for the conclave. Mrs. Walter Schfeter of L$ don, district vice president, is of the hostess club. Main speaker for the distrid meeting will be Mrs. E. K. 1, boldt, of Gackla, State president ^!"t  the North Dakota Federation " Women's clubs. Miss Bessie Wright of Gr. Forks spent last week here Wi her sisters, the Misses Cha rl0t and Ruth Wright. his family. It is further ordered on the board  we could under- Colorado for over two years. He that this resolution be made a per- stand each other. For their Ger- had then been in England for 10 manent part of the records of the man lesson they had to put some months and spoke flawless Eng- The Walsh County Press Park River Fire Department and of the things I had said into the lish. I4 was good to be able to talk that a suitably inscribed copy be best possible German and write it as much as I liked and he helped down. I read if to them in German the Webels and me cheek our un-  .... ,-- . ' NATIONAL EDITORIA ByPresentedthe Committeet the familYon Resolutlons:f our be- fwhich really was funny) and then derstanding of each other. We have Mrs. arry u rmn  i IASbCIITI NA T '= loved and departed member, in English. Most of the children been doing very well. S'O C' will go on to a higher school where 'The mail just arrived. Airmall Editor & Publisher .'; I I  ,-./ J Harold Schlenk English will be one of the subjects, letters take 5 days; others, 12 days. Published every Thursday from The - <'-Press bniltling,Park River, N_. Henry W. Kelly Dakota, and entered in the lrk River postoffice under the Act of C Parents of Local Weed and Insect Control gress of March 3,1879. Subseription rates, $2.50 a year in North Dal Woman Honored =3 a year elsewhere. On Anniversary When Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hall- dorson of Mountain observed their 50th wedding anniversary on June 24, more than 200 relatives and friends called at their home at Mountain. They are parents of Mrs. Fridjon Thorleifson of Park River, and are frequent visitors at her home. Open house was held from 3 to 5 o'clock, with children of the hon- ored couple as sponsors. Inga Bjarnason poured and Kathy Thor- leifson was in charge of the guest book. A bouquet of flowers placed beneath a heart shaped arch form- ed the centerpiece for the refresh- ment table. Mr. and Mrs Halldorson were married June 24, 1906, in Vikur Lu- theran church at Mountain with the Rev. H.B. Thorgrimson offi- ciating. Their attendants were Rosa Josephson, Mozart. Sask., and Tryggvi Bjarnson, of Mountain, who were present for the anniver- sary observance. The Halldorsons have always been residents of the Mountain vi- cinity with the exception of two years spent at Hollywood Calif. They had farmed near Mountain until they retired and moved into Mountain. Besides Mrs. Thorleifson, there are four other children: Marvin and Richard of Mountain: Ernest, of Los Angeles and Mrs John Berndson of Van Nuys, Calif. IN MEMORIAM In memory of our husband and father, Henry Clemetson. who passed away in July 1941. Not lost to those that love him, Not dead. just gone before: He still lives in our memory And will forever more. Rest In Peace Mxs. Gustie Clemetson VIr. and Mrs. Selvin Dahlen, Mx. and Mrs, Alden Clemetson, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Staven, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Larson. Mr. and Mrs. G1ad- Wln Clametson, Mr. and Mrs. Clair Cledetsoyle Clemetson. SKJERVEN'S FLYING SERVICE Dial 36201 or 36952 PARK RIVER Business - Professional Directory DR. R. W. BALDWIN Dentist Park River Dial 22831 ROY A. NESTE Lawyer Dial 36781 Park River DR. M. C. FLATEN Dentist Edinburg Phone 1 call .2 Drs. Galloway K Otis Practica Limited to Optometry -- The Science of Vl,loD J. K. Galloway Vernon Otis. Devils Lake, N. L Phone 334 PARK RIVER CLINIC Dial 22271 H. R. Hiltingsd, M. D. Jamea K. O'Toole, M. D. Physicians and Surgeons 22941 Home Dials 46411 DR. J. V. JAEHNING Dentist Office Over Penney= Grafton Phone 795 NORTH SIDE GROCERY Homer Lucken Prop. Groceries and Cold Meats Store Hours: Week day=, 8 a. m. to9p. m. Sun. 2 to 6 p. n Park River Dial 22291 PARK RIVER ELECTRIC See us for Farm & Home wiring. Free Estlmate. Low costs. Licensed and Bonded M. 1 Sorenson, Prop Dial 22092 Park River WE$ SAMSON Electrical Contractor Licensed & Bonded WIRING OF ALL KINDS DONE RIGHT Guaranteed EUmM Park River Dial MI6i OVERBYE FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL DIRECTORS Ambulance Service Monuments Phone: Day 38542 Night, 22961 or 46211 Park Rtve, North Dakota NO OBLmAT00O S I 9 9 5 Jast try it - - if yon dtid# # (Cover Ea) buy, pay only $2 down, $2 montMy Everything yo= cook will taste more delicious with controlled electric heat/ ELECTRIC FRYPAPi Now you can try'the SUNBEAM FRYPAN in your o ome for 10 days without cost or obligation-prepare favorite foods without guessi on the temperature, witb ,watching , . . Then, ff you decide to keep . constant Frypan, pay only $2.00 a month for controlled heat c od'" ing-or return the F  absolutely no obllgs ti LOOK FOR THEOO-OP MAN WITH THE ELECTIIO FRYPAI Watch o your ]ocslo'l ttve psentv k e wgl  at l'lrl'. 10 D.FIUgR.;rRI OFFER as=ee d=der f= =a=01 dens. Nodak Rural EleCtric Co.operatlVe PAGE TWO PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, JULY 26, Actually, I don't know how to start this column, for what I un- covered a coupla days ago is so darn far-fetched that I'm liable to get a berth in the hospital at Jamestown if I put it in writing. But here goes nothing... bwk Now, I know that you folks have heard of pink elephants, flying horses, mermaids, talking dogs and such, and I wouldn't even be sur- prised if some of you had run across some of these critters at one time or another. But, I'm doggone sure that none of you have been introduced yet to a talking mailbox. Yep, you heard me . . . an honest-to-goodness hunk of tin with vocal chords. hwk Stay wit me readers, and rll explain te latest combination to hit the large city street corners since fire hydrants and stray dogs . . the mailbox with a voice. Now, X'm aware as the next fella of how Postmaster General Summerfield is attempting to jack up the postal department. So far, he's made more changes than a new mother with a two-weeks-old kid. I been noticing such remark- able innovations as new light- weight ballpoint pens in place of the old fashioned scratchy kind, and in large metropolis's such as Grafton they even got some pulse- quickening red, white and blue mailboxes to replace those khaki colored oldtimers. Also, they tell me that a lot of the country's let- ter carriers now go on their ap- pointed rounds looking like hotel bellhops in their maroon striped pants and ties. hwk Well, I've strung along with Summerfield in hopes that the law of averages would hit him on the noodle and get him hustling on the. raeal problem--slow mail de- liveries. About the only difference I can detect, however, since they started these new tangled ideas. that instead of just coming late s before, the mail arrives late now in circus colored trucks. hwk To get back to the talking mail- box . . . I like the old fashioned one fine just the way it is. The only complaint ] got is that the colleetion"alwayb seems to take place five minutes before I get there with an important letter, and sometimes it takes an awful lot of time for the letter to get from the mail box to the recipient. Otherwise, me and the old style models used, to get along swell. In fact, until this latest bit of news came out, they've been my favorite partners in conversation. They and walls. I always kind of figured a guy could unload his woes on them without the bank, neighbors, or wife getting wind of it. But mow comes the word that the new mail boxes can indulge in two-way confabs with thefr customers. From now on I'm going to keep my trap shut around them. I'll just talk to walls. Actually, I guess its still in the :experimental stage, but by that I imagine they mean that the alum- inum Frankenstein can only carry on a conversation in one lang- uage. First thing ya know, the dad- blamed things will be striking up a conversation with a gent about .yesterday's ballgame while he is waiting on the corner for his mis- sus. And the second thing you know, you'll wind up betting against the Yankees, or maybe miss the wife. Or you dash up to mail a letter and the box says smugly, "The next collection will be at 7 P. M. tomorrow. Better trot down to the main post office, you dope." hwk I imagine there ain't a blamed :thing I can do about the situation, but it sure paints a gloomy out- ]ook for the near future. It is only a question of time, from what I hear, until everything else will be Pvetty much in the same boat. The gents with the brains got a fancy name for thi$ new era that we are entering  'automationism.' I only holm that some of, these science fiction writers aren t right, for I've read a couple stories where the machines suddenly got emotional & took over the world. I'm pretty rttre that'd never happen, you un- derstand, especially if you keep a limit on the number. Still. they tell me those were the famous last Words uttered, when they put the float rabbit in Australia. You people probably think that rm making this malarkey up, but it's the truth. Why, I even read that someplace_ over. in Germany ff rd drop a coupla mark= in a matr, a little card po L out, tucin you to a lady or tn in matrimony. Guess t also furnishes a description ot eyes, hair, disposition and :finances. By go, I' almost wager that m0re information is psented on that little card than some people took time to find out when the were in the market for a spou, I've seen some duets that  together about as well as taffy and false teeth. In fact, I might go as far as to recommend that they put them marriage vending mach- ines up all over. I figure it would save a lot of folks from wasting unnecessary time and money, not to mention a few broken hearts. It kinda makes me sad to think of all the foolish women who have squandered their time trying to snare such cagey bachelors as Dr. R. W. Baldwin, Glen Engh,Gummy Rtliff, this city, and Louie Whelan, St. Thomas. Now, if they just had one of those vending Home00 EcTeacher Has Language DiffiCulties in German Dialects Miss Virginia Falter, former I "In the class for younger cnil- Home Economics teacher in Park ldren they sang several songs for River, writes another letter from lme and then went on with their Germany where she is spending I studies. The second class was read- the summer. / ing the story of the country mouse are crossed. He'll probably boot you off the premises and give the loot to the burglar. I'm even afraid they'll mess around with Thanksgiving too. Soon you'll be dropping your mon- ey in a slot and steely voice will reply, "Light or dark meat, please?" hwk Yup, at the rate she's going, there'll come a day when you are plunked in a chair by a mechani- cal waiter. You eat the mechanical meal. You wait for the mechanical hatcheck to return your derby. And, when nobody's looking, you slip a thin dime into the tip slot. And the mechanical voice whis- pers, "Cheapskate." That's it folks. Looks like the machines are here to stay. "I am really having doubts about how well I will ever speak the German language. It gets more confusing all the time. On Friday I finally learned the correct high German word for 'home' It is "Hime." However, here in Grosnie- dershein, the dialect is "hame" and in Klienniedersheim (2 kilometers, or 1.2 miles away) the word is "home." In Klienneidersheim they also say 'no' for "no,' not "nay" as they do in Grosniedersheim, or nein, which is high German. machines to consult! "By the way, Grosniedersheim Otherwise though, I can't see I means big niedersheim; Klein much good in these walking means small and 2 kilos in the oth- switchboards. Can you argue with er direction is by-niedersheim. All a mechanical salesman? Can you lthese villages axe about 750 years pinch a mechanical waitress? And, I ld" when fh= fire,= om.o , A;I o ] 'The past week has been rather ............................ busy. One morning I made black mechanical cop, suppose his wires cherry jam. Here they melt the Resolution of Sympathy ] WHEREAS, the Divine Creator I has, in His infinite Wisdom, seen I fit to remove from this life one of I highly valued members of the Park River Fire Department, WALTER L. DOUGHERTY THEREFORE BE IT RESOLV- ED, That the Park River Fire De- partment does hereby express sin- care regret at his passing and ex- tends sincere and heartfelt sym- pathy to the surviving members of sugar, add the fruit pulp and boil for five minutes. The jars are ster- ilized by burning sulphur paper under them and sealed with cello- phane. I also ironed one morning with an electric iron but on a flare table. I never realized before how difficult a skirt and blouse could be to iron. That afternoon we pick- ed the cherries from the last tree. We all ate plenty. Then we pruned and tied up grapevines. It was so cold here last winter that almost all grapevines in this vicinity were killed. They come back from the roots but this year there is all the work and no grapes. Working with those low grapevines is harder on the back of the legs than setting up exercises. "Thursday I paid a visit to the local school (Folkschule) which is like our elementary school. There are two teachers, each with four classes. With the older children. I was the geography lesson for the day. They had seen movies about America in school and wanted to check on the facts. Does the mail really come by auto to a box on the farms? Do you have cowboys with guns in North Dakota? How did you get to Germany? What route did you take? Do all girls in America wear short hair or do some have braids? Do you really eat bacon & eggs for breakfast? (Here breakfast consists of bread, butter, jam and coffee with milk.} Of course I had trouble under- standing and speaking but all spoke slowly for my benefit. Fre- quently we had to draw pictures and the city mouse. The first class had a short story about a mouse and cat. I happened to be sitting near the door when it was time for dismissal and had to shake hands and say Goodbye to all 30 of them. They must have run home to tell Angela (the four-year-old in the family) I was in school because at lunch it was reported that they had said, "Angela's fraulein was in school and spoke very good Ger- man." I can say "auf weidersehen" (goodbye} quite well. "Tomorrow I am going with the school by omnibus for a tour of Pfaltz (the state). "Here in Germany the children have only 8 weeks vacationtwo weeks in the fall and six in sum- mer. They have school all day in winter but in summer only until noon. starting at 7 a. m. "Yesterday I went to church. There were about 40 people pres- ent, mostly older women and young children. There were only five men in church, besides the I mstor and the organist. The church s supported by a tax which has recently been raised from 8% to 10%. In Grosniededsheim, after the war. to replace the bells, the women of the church did have a cake sale where they also served lunch. 'Trau Webel. my host, is about 28 or 30 years old and is a very up to date home maker. She attended the farm wife school and took her master briefing, which would be about equivalent to having a college degree in home economics. After attending school, she had to work on another farm for a period of time doing all phases of work-- cooking, sewing, child care, garden- ing, field work etc. She also has had several of these girl appren- tices in her home. "Her husband, about 30 or 35, was a prisoner of war with the Russians for three years. He has spoken of it very little except to say he was bent over like an old man when he came home and that there was never enough to eat. I have met other prisoners of war, too. Some have been American prisoners and some were held by the Soviets. Last night we visited Frau Webel's cousin, whose hus- band had been an American pris- oner of war I talked also with a man who had been in Missouri and I STRICTLY BUSINESS W DAHLS RETURN FROM Federated Clubs VACATION TRIP TO COAST Mr. and Mrs. Theo. Dahl and Plan District Meel their son and daughter-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Dahl. returned on Wednesday from a two weeks' va- cation trip that took them to the west coast. On the way out they stopped at Libby, Mont., to visit the Ben Ar- ness family, formerly of Park River and toured Glacier National park and Grand Coulee dam. said to be the largest dam in the world. At Puyallup, Wash., they called on Mr. and Mrs. Walter Hot/is, the latter being a niece of Mrs. Theo. Dahl. Going on to British Columbia. the Park Riverites stopped to see Roy Gillespies at Vancouver and at the Alex Gillespie home in Langley. Traveling south along the coast. they did some sight seeing in San Francisco and came home by way of Yellowstone National park and the Garrison dam in North Dakota. In Garrison they called on Mr. and Mrs. Miles Vreeland. Scratch pads, 20c a pound, at The Press office, tf At Langd0n The First District of the Federst" ed clubs will hold the annoal di trict meeting at Langdon Frid' August 31, with the Langon W0 an's club as hostess. Mrs. Harry O'Brien of Park er, district president, and Mrs. " D. Uglem, Northwood district retary, will meet Saturday,  28, with the Langdon club to r plans for the conclave. Mrs. Walter Schfeter of L$ don, district vice president, is of the hostess club. Main speaker for the distrid meeting will be Mrs. E. K. 1, boldt, of Gackla, State president ^!"t  the North Dakota Federation " Women's clubs. Miss Bessie Wright of Gr. Forks spent last week here Wi her sisters, the Misses Cha rl0t and Ruth Wright. his family. It is further ordered on the board  we could under- Colorado for over two years. He that this resolution be made a per- stand each other. For their Ger- had then been in England for 10 manent part of the records of the man lesson they had to put some months and spoke flawless Eng- The Walsh County Press Park River Fire Department and of the things I had said into the lish. I4 was good to be able to talk that a suitably inscribed copy be best possible German and write it as much as I liked and he helped down. I read if to them in German the Webels and me cheek our un-  .... ,-- . ' NATIONAL EDITORIA ByPresentedthe Committeet the familYon Resolutlons:f our be- fwhich really was funny) and then derstanding of each other. We have Mrs. arry u rmn  i IASbCIITI NA T '= loved and departed member, in English. Most of the children been doing very well. S'O C' will go on to a higher school where 'The mail just arrived. Airmall Editor & Publisher .'; I I  ,-./ J Harold Schlenk English will be one of the subjects, letters take 5 days; others, 12 days. Published every Thursday from The - <'-Press bniltling,Park River, N_. Henry W. Kelly Dakota, and entered in the lrk River postoffice under the Act of C Parents of Local Weed and Insect Control gress of March 3,1879. Subseription rates, $2.50 a year in North Dal Woman Honored =3 a year elsewhere. On Anniversary When Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hall- dorson of Mountain observed their 50th wedding anniversary on June 24, more than 200 relatives and friends called at their home at Mountain. They are parents of Mrs. Fridjon Thorleifson of Park River, and are frequent visitors at her home. Open house was held from 3 to 5 o'clock, with children of the hon- ored couple as sponsors. Inga Bjarnason poured and Kathy Thor- leifson was in charge of the guest book. A bouquet of flowers placed beneath a heart shaped arch form- ed the centerpiece for the refresh- ment table. Mr. and Mrs Halldorson were married June 24, 1906, in Vikur Lu- theran church at Mountain with the Rev. H.B. Thorgrimson offi- ciating. Their attendants were Rosa Josephson, Mozart. Sask., and Tryggvi Bjarnson, of Mountain, who were present for the anniver- sary observance. The Halldorsons have always been residents of the Mountain vi- cinity with the exception of two years spent at Hollywood Calif. They had farmed near Mountain until they retired and moved into Mountain. Besides Mrs. Thorleifson, there are four other children: Marvin and Richard of Mountain: Ernest, of Los Angeles and Mrs John Berndson of Van Nuys, Calif. IN MEMORIAM In memory of our husband and father, Henry Clemetson. who passed away in July 1941. Not lost to those that love him, Not dead. just gone before: He still lives in our memory And will forever more. Rest In Peace Mxs. Gustie Clemetson VIr. and Mrs. Selvin Dahlen, Mx. and Mrs, Alden Clemetson, Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Staven, Mr. and Mrs. Hubert Larson. Mr. and Mrs. G1ad- Wln Clametson, Mr. and Mrs. Clair Cledetsoyle Clemetson. SKJERVEN'S FLYING SERVICE Dial 36201 or 36952 PARK RIVER Business - Professional Directory DR. R. W. BALDWIN Dentist Park River Dial 22831 ROY A. NESTE Lawyer Dial 36781 Park River DR. M. C. FLATEN Dentist Edinburg Phone 1 call .2 Drs. Galloway K Otis Practica Limited to Optometry -- The Science of Vl,loD J. K. Galloway Vernon Otis. Devils Lake, N. L Phone 334 PARK RIVER CLINIC Dial 22271 H. R. Hiltingsd, M. D. Jamea K. O'Toole, M. D. Physicians and Surgeons 22941 Home Dials 46411 DR. J. V. JAEHNING Dentist Office Over Penney= Grafton Phone 795 NORTH SIDE GROCERY Homer Lucken Prop. Groceries and Cold Meats Store Hours: Week day=, 8 a. m. to9p. m. Sun. 2 to 6 p. n Park River Dial 22291 PARK RIVER ELECTRIC See us for Farm & Home wiring. Free Estlmate. Low costs. Licensed and Bonded M. 1 Sorenson, Prop Dial 22092 Park River WE$ SAMSON Electrical Contractor Licensed & Bonded WIRING OF ALL KINDS DONE RIGHT Guaranteed EUmM Park River Dial MI6i OVERBYE FUNERAL HOME FUNERAL DIRECTORS Ambulance Service Monuments Phone: Day 38542 Night, 22961 or 46211 Park Rtve, North Dakota NO OBLmAT00O S I 9 9 5 Jast try it - - if yon dtid# # (Cover Ea) buy, pay only $2 down, $2 montMy Everything yo= cook will taste more delicious with controlled electric heat/ ELECTRIC FRYPAPi Now you can try'the SUNBEAM FRYPAN in your o ome for 10 days without cost or obligation-prepare favorite foods without guessi on the temperature, witb ,watching , . . Then, ff you decide to keep . constant Frypan, pay only $2.00 a month for controlled heat c od'" ing-or return the F  absolutely no obllgs ti LOOK FOR THEOO-OP MAN WITH THE ELECTIIO FRYPAI Watch o your ]ocslo'l ttve psentv k e wgl  at l'lrl'. 10 D.FIUgR.;rRI OFFER as=ee d=der f= =a=01 dens. Nodak Rural EleCtric Co.operatlVe