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Park River , North Dakota
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May 19, 1955     Walsh County Press
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PAGE EIGHT WALSH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, MAY 19, I HORT TOPS.. I Meeting in Bismarck last week end the North Dakota Federation of Women's clubs went on record as favoring .a few things. This was done mainly by resolutions which will very likely accomplish nothing much if they are as effective s most such wordy documents. Oe of the things that the good ladies in convention assembled resolved abolrSFas the lake which will be cre: by the impounding of the wa*Of the Missouri river by the Garrison dam. They want it named "Sawea '' in honor of the Indian woman Who guided the Lewis and Clark expedition through these parts exactly 150 years ago now. OoO seems like a reasonable me. And, maybe it will pass, who knows? Sakaka- you old timers, they don't put the "J" in it any more) was known.to the members of the expe- dition as "The Bird Woman" be- cause that is what her Indian name means. This is the sesquicentennial (isn*t that a dickens of a long word to use in place of 150?) anniversary of the Lewis & Clark expedition and it seems that after all Sakaka- wea did for those two gents, it seems recognition for her is long over due. She was about 19 years of age when she guided the group on their urney to look over the ter- ritory the U S. government got in the Louisiana Purchase. She was a mighty handy gal to have in the party, especially in this area for she was familiar with the lay of the land and also was able to prevent attacks by the Indians who didn't care much about having Lewis & Clark or any other white men mess- ing around in their hunting gvounl n O o It is quite possible that when she was actually on the scene doing her stuff Sakakawea didn't get full credit for her ability from the men she aided so skillully. However, one present day writer has listed her as one of the six important women in history. In view of that fact, she won'only have a lake named after her. b,she may get into the hall of fme, She will, that Is, if Minnie J. l.oValley City gets her way. SI@,2h Dakota has ao repre- itv,in the hall o mne in , D. C., Minnie J. is in vo* Of Z lying The Bird Woman I$W. To that end she is head- ilaaovmnent topt the legis- lt/ re410 mmmthln-.--. ;'t  000 Be,id ]nuBlnl a law about ii. th lellltrll/ undoubtedly., would l/I/cl aproprlate some mon to i lb'Ele statue and other expen. *4'ted with the proJee lt,/hhe legislative assembly Vreel that Sakakawea is the n: should be named to l1$ilkOta's niche in the .hall of i t:: moot question. On what si shoM such an honor be given sta.e0 bring out a division of opinion. It might bring on days and days of discussion. Just because the Women,s Federation is advocating special North Dakota honors for the-famed Indian woman is no sign she will be accorded them. There 17-OZ. 100% only the p100lC00 i cang/ 12.95 Choice o] FOREST GREEN * /  SAGE GREY DESERT TAN Cruisers Available EBBSEN'S Park River, N. D. III MRS. HARRY O'BP, I I I -- are other ideas as to what the Gar- rison dam lake should oughta be called. There is strong support for naming the lake after Highway . Commissioner Sivert W. Thompson, of Bismarck, who was one of the early supporters of the Missiouri River Diversion project. The final decision will be up to Congress and I there's no telling what they will de- .cide. But the-women can dream, can't they? o O o Another type of name-calling also went orFin Bismarck lasteek and in other parts of the state following the appointment of Toly Schmidt of Napoleon as State land commis- sioner to suCceed John O. Lyngstad. The appointment was made by the Board of University and School Lands, which for the first time in many moons is cont2blled by the Nonpartisan League. Members of the Board are Governor Brunsdale, M. F. Peterson, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Ben Meier, Sec- retary of State, Berta Baker, State Auditor and Leslie R. Burgum At- torney General. Directed at Bur- gum the epitaphs included such terms as are familiar in politics-- double cross, turn coat. traitor etc It was believed that the Attorney General could have blocked the ap- pointment if he had chosen to do SO. o O o Many were contending for the post but in recent weeks the field was narrowed down to Schmidt and Orris G. Nordhougen of Leeds, for- mer state senator and unsuccessful candidate for the U. S, House of Representatives in 1954. For those who don't know, the rPL is divided into two factions, the old guard and the insurgents. Schmidt is. an old guard and so is Meier. Both hail from the same community, Napol- eon, so it is easy to see why they stuck together. Mrs. Baker Is also a conservative and she supported Schmidt too. The governor and Peterson are members of the Re- publican Organizing Committee and they didn't want any brand of NPL member, but stood solid be- hind the incumbent Lynptad. In- asmuch as Burgum poed' as a Democrat for many year, and re- considerable oil on the troubled waters to get support of the warring groups. He surely will need more than the Old Guard NPL o win. ooo I read with considerable interest the account of the voting at the Board meeting where Schmidt was chosen. Supt. Peterson passed his vote, saying he never had met Schmidt and knew nothing about him, and--quote: "I do not want to be accused of voting for someone I've never seen." That is quite typi- cal of Mr. Peterson in most matters. A modest appearing, mild manner- ed school man, Mr. Peterson usual- ly avoids taking a stand on any sub- ject. Legend. has it, however, that there are some notable occasions on which he did take a stand. One was the year the Republican party sold Tom Whelan down the river when he sought reelectio as State Republican chairman. The")ld tale has it that the convention was deadlocked with Whelan and Milton Rue (present Republican chairman) as candidates. Peterson had been for Whelan all along but after several ballots it was Peterson who switch- ed after a "trip to the wood shed" in company with some of the top brass. Rue was elected and it was not long afterwards that Mr. P. re: ceived an appointment to work in in the office he now heads. Some think the two events had some con- nection with each other. Could be. oOo A more recent story about what Mr. Peterson accomplishes when he does take a stand is said to have tak- en place this year as candidates for the Board of Higher Education were being considered. Along with some other Walsh County people, the name of R. R. Morgan of Grafton had been put up. Who was it but Mr. Peterson who was reported to have turned thumbs down on his name. The rules say the choice of candidates must be unanimous by the Board, sooo this let Morgan out; If thesestories be true, that man Peterson must be dynamlte when he chooses to let himself go, but you'd neyer guess it by looking at him. ooo Something else I heard in Bis- marck from no less a person than Sen. William Langer also had some- thing to do with names. This was the-name of our ate--North Da- kota, which the Senator claims has not been proclaimed properly in song. He said he was tired of not having a catchy song to identify our state and so he set about having one written. In his own inimitable Way'lr. Langer told o the ups and cetved considerable support from dowrm he encountered in hisquest the liberals out the state it1 of a pr ditty for us to be known his recent electio R wua :W. b ' He venito a New York so/i blow, indeed, when he' topedfav  W, dte ahd" suggested that the feI orin Nordhougen and:/Iy thre ] vth!p cute ua with the verve and in with Meier and'BakerifflnllhJ apF6ttle " lcwa Corn Song o . :" ,,,"  /:.:  ' l"bh)in'"Imt .t-ti*tortll Scuttlebutt in Blsm|lR I/d It l rH Rh fli notes agree f8 that now Nordhogu'en has beenld>"the'0J,"butfelt he would b piomised support if he becomes Jrn0re-':ff/ nspired if hehadil candidate for goverli'n'i,l.:Aiii [ lln )nti tej: y 'ab0ut $100 "in s, more scuttlebiitt his lt!!he iib ] s: !kt: pl::?he Senr feR handiwork of 'Se. H Day + Of I fhe price ws a"ltflIe .ep, +but" k Grand Forks warnoted :n' i | Was |ghtyanxious  geta pro'l" move in order to get the' Leeds::man s0ng for lls home state so- he shell: ott bf the way in case Day lectdeS e diout. n due time the song, corn= to run for Congr,ess next year. AnP- pIete;'ith Words & -music, c/me Way, the DemUrs and te I ,alonf arid HIz Honor scrounged Insurgents and the ROC are all mad around and got somebody to play at BurgUm o if he runs agaio in and sing it 'for him. While it dldnt '56. he probably will have to pour rike him as being a $100 worth of i Do it Yourself KENTILE AsphoH TILE 9"x 9" squares in e wde variety of 7 C smart new colors. You can easily do the work yo,rseif. You can buy all you need on our easy terms .... $5.00 per month. CH ROBERTSON IuHMEB ER COMPANY Dial 36601 Vern Chally, Mgr. Park River THERE'S A ROBERTSON YARD NEAR YOU melody, he didn't want to pass his own judgment on it too hasitily so called up ten friends in North Da- kota and had the song presented to them by long distance telephone. They were unanimous in saying the song was a stinkeroo and so it was discarded. ooo Not being a man to give up easily, Sen. Langer tried again and now claims he has hit the jackpot so far as OUR STATE SONG goes. Next Saturday the song will be introduc- ed in the state at the WDAY music festival in Fargo. It will be on TV and the radio and the Senator says he has had 1,000 records made of it. The recordings were made by a group of singers on the Perry Como show known as "The Strangers." Written by Paul Cunningham, with music by Leonard Whitcup and pub- lished by the Remiek Music Corp., of New York, all royalties have been waived and any monies com- ing from the sale of the song will go to the Crippled Children's School at Jamestown, ooo Here are the words for the new song--watch for it on TV and radio from Fargo Saturday, May 21: oOo North Dakota. North Dakota, Where blue skies brighten your way, There's no state half as great And it gets greater ev'ry day, With its mountains and its valleys And stalwart sons on the go, Rolling plains, vast domains, Oh we love North 1kota so With the black gold flowing And the wheat crop growing And the cattle grazing there, With its friendly people looking t'ward a steeple On a house of Prayer. North Dakota. North Dakota, Is really up on its toes, There's no state half as great As the State of the Prairie Rose! o O o Didn't I get an earful in Bis- marck last week end, though? R Smorgasbord ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH Rural Hoople Memorial Day Monday, May 30 Serving 5 to 8 P. M. Adults $1.00. Childrer/ under 12. 50c MENU Ham, Rullepole, Cpld Cuts Lefse, Home Made Rolls, Salads Nbrwegian Flote Grot, Cheese, Fresh Vegetable& Cookies AI'TFAfD SIFL'TOWIIKI FUNEIIL )II IIA&y' Funeral services for J. . Schtle. towski. 88, were he]d Saturday at Mary's church kere / with the Rev. John J. O'Meara officiating. Those from out of town who at- tended the rites were Mr. and Mrs. Joe Pzybiiski. Mrs. Pearl Yutrinka of Argyle, Minn.; Mrs. Andrew. Ro- minski and John Grotzeh of Strand- quEst. Minn., Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Kuznia and son and Anion dish- ovski and daughter and Mrs. Ger- Budishovski of Stephen, Mlrmt., Mr. and Mrs. Jack Johnson. Mayville; Penas of Grand Forks. Mr. Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Curfman of La- Leonard Ottem and son, Roger, verne, N. D, Jennifer and Clinton Philip Penas of Fargo. Nay Crowning Sunday, May 22 Procession Starts 3 P. M. . AT PISEK Baccalaureate Service for Pisek School in Chuh i!nndiately following. + DINNER SERVED BEGINNING AT 5 P. M. THE PUBLIC IS INIVTED St. John Nepomuk Church Pisek, North Dakota Cars Trucks Tractors 1951 Ford Fordor Custom V-8 Radio, Heater, Overdrive, Low Mileage 1950 Ford Custom Tudor V-8 Radio, Heater, Overdrive 1949 Plymouth, Fordor & Tudor Both clean cars - Low Price ".' Wide+Variety '46, '47, '48 models 1951 Ford V-8 -Ton Pickup Low Mileage - Excellent Condition 1938 Ford Truck with box "'H" . 00rpat 0nal Excellent Condition, Good Rubber, with pump 1950 John ne00r"00 + mbWer " BATEMAN MOTORS parR'River, N. Dak.. '- Dial +36271 " 1315 BIRTHDAY SALE MAY 19 20 21 Ocean Spray ,CRANBERRIES, Strained 2 cans 4Sc Dulaney GREEN BEANS, French Style 2 cans 45c Butter Kernel CORN, Cream or Wh. Kernel . 6 cans69c PEAS, Butter Kernel, No. 3 sv. - 6 cans $1.00 TREET, 12 oz can - 39c BEEF STEW, Dinty Moore, 24 oz can - 39c DOG FOOD, Vets canned 11 cans 1.00 BISQUICK 40 oz pkg 43c Devils Food, Spice, White-Marble CAKE MIX, Duncan Hines - 3 pkgs $1.00 SHORTENING, E-Z KREEM, . 3-1b can 7Sc COFFEE FLAV-O-RICH, Ib tin 19 SUGAR 10-1b bag 97 FRESH FROZEN FOOD STRAWBERRIES, Birds Eye, 10-oz 3 pkg 85c PEAS, NORTH STATE, 10-oz 7 pkgs CAULIFLOWER, No. State, 10 oz. - 2 pkgS CUT CORN, North State, 10 oz 2 pkg s MEATS SLAB BACON, by the piece Ib' PORK SAUSAGE Ib SMOKED PORK LINKS Ib YORKSHIRE CERVELAT - I Fruits & Vegetables PASCAL CELERY . bun LEMONS 6 for ORANGES, 288 size 2 doX LETTUCE 2 head GRAPEFRUIT, Ruby Red 3 for WE BUY EGGS WE GIVE .. GREEN STAMPS LOCKERS GROCERIES  F.A ft PAGE EIGHT WALSH COUNTY PRESS, PARK RIVER, NORTH DAKOTA THURSDAY, MAY 19, I HORT TOPS.. I Meeting in Bismarck last week end the North Dakota Federation of Women's clubs went on record as favoring .a few things. This was done mainly by resolutions which will very likely accomplish nothing much if they are as effective s most such wordy documents. Oe of the things that the good ladies in convention assembled resolved abolrSFas the lake which will be cre: by the impounding of the wa*Of the Missouri river by the Garrison dam. They want it named "Sawea '' in honor of the Indian woman Who guided the Lewis and Clark expedition through these parts exactly 150 years ago now. OoO seems like a reasonable me. And, maybe it will pass, who knows? Sakaka- you old timers, they don't put the "J" in it any more) was known.to the members of the expe- dition as "The Bird Woman" be- cause that is what her Indian name means. This is the sesquicentennial (isn*t that a dickens of a long word to use in place of 150?) anniversary of the Lewis & Clark expedition and it seems that after all Sakaka- wea did for those two gents, it seems recognition for her is long over due. She was about 19 years of age when she guided the group on their urney to look over the ter- ritory the U S. government got in the Louisiana Purchase. She was a mighty handy gal to have in the party, especially in this area for she was familiar with the lay of the land and also was able to prevent attacks by the Indians who didn't care much about having Lewis & Clark or any other white men mess- ing around in their hunting gvounl n O o It is quite possible that when she was actually on the scene doing her stuff Sakakawea didn't get full credit for her ability from the men she aided so skillully. However, one present day writer has listed her as one of the six important women in history. In view of that fact, she won'only have a lake named after her. b,she may get into the hall of fme, She will, that Is, if Minnie J. l.oValley City gets her way. SI@,2h Dakota has ao repre- itv,in the hall o mne in , D. C., Minnie J. is in vo* Of Z lying The Bird Woman I$W. To that end she is head- ilaaovmnent topt the legis- lt/ re410 mmmthln-.--. ;'t  000 Be,id ]nuBlnl a law about ii. th lellltrll/ undoubtedly., would l/I/cl aproprlate some mon to i lb'Ele statue and other expen. *4'ted with the proJee lt,/hhe legislative assembly Vreel that Sakakawea is the n: should be named to l1$ilkOta's niche in the .hall of i t:: moot question. On what si shoM such an honor be given sta.e0 bring out a division of opinion. It might bring on days and days of discussion. Just because the Women,s Federation is advocating special North Dakota honors for the-famed Indian woman is no sign she will be accorded them. There 17-OZ. 100% only the p100lC00 i cang/ 12.95 Choice o] FOREST GREEN * /  SAGE GREY DESERT TAN Cruisers Available EBBSEN'S Park River, N. D. III MRS. HARRY O'BP, I I I -- are other ideas as to what the Gar- rison dam lake should oughta be called. There is strong support for naming the lake after Highway . Commissioner Sivert W. Thompson, of Bismarck, who was one of the early supporters of the Missiouri River Diversion project. The final decision will be up to Congress and I there's no telling what they will de- .cide. But the-women can dream, can't they? o O o Another type of name-calling also went orFin Bismarck lasteek and in other parts of the state following the appointment of Toly Schmidt of Napoleon as State land commis- sioner to suCceed John O. Lyngstad. The appointment was made by the Board of University and School Lands, which for the first time in many moons is cont2blled by the Nonpartisan League. Members of the Board are Governor Brunsdale, M. F. Peterson, Superintendent of Public Instruction, Ben Meier, Sec- retary of State, Berta Baker, State Auditor and Leslie R. Burgum At- torney General. Directed at Bur- gum the epitaphs included such terms as are familiar in politics-- double cross, turn coat. traitor etc It was believed that the Attorney General could have blocked the ap- pointment if he had chosen to do SO. o O o Many were contending for the post but in recent weeks the field was narrowed down to Schmidt and Orris G. Nordhougen of Leeds, for- mer state senator and unsuccessful candidate for the U. S, House of Representatives in 1954. For those who don't know, the rPL is divided into two factions, the old guard and the insurgents. Schmidt is. an old guard and so is Meier. Both hail from the same community, Napol- eon, so it is easy to see why they stuck together. Mrs. Baker Is also a conservative and she supported Schmidt too. The governor and Peterson are members of the Re- publican Organizing Committee and they didn't want any brand of NPL member, but stood solid be- hind the incumbent Lynptad. In- asmuch as Burgum poed' as a Democrat for many year, and re- considerable oil on the troubled waters to get support of the warring groups. He surely will need more than the Old Guard NPL o win. ooo I read with considerable interest the account of the voting at the Board meeting where Schmidt was chosen. Supt. Peterson passed his vote, saying he never had met Schmidt and knew nothing about him, and--quote: "I do not want to be accused of voting for someone I've never seen." That is quite typi- cal of Mr. Peterson in most matters. A modest appearing, mild manner- ed school man, Mr. Peterson usual- ly avoids taking a stand on any sub- ject. Legend. has it, however, that there are some notable occasions on which he did take a stand. One was the year the Republican party sold Tom Whelan down the river when he sought reelectio as State Republican chairman. The")ld tale has it that the convention was deadlocked with Whelan and Milton Rue (present Republican chairman) as candidates. Peterson had been for Whelan all along but after several ballots it was Peterson who switch- ed after a "trip to the wood shed" in company with some of the top brass. Rue was elected and it was not long afterwards that Mr. P. re: ceived an appointment to work in in the office he now heads. Some think the two events had some con- nection with each other. Could be. oOo A more recent story about what Mr. Peterson accomplishes when he does take a stand is said to have tak- en place this year as candidates for the Board of Higher Education were being considered. Along with some other Walsh County people, the name of R. R. Morgan of Grafton had been put up. Who was it but Mr. Peterson who was reported to have turned thumbs down on his name. The rules say the choice of candidates must be unanimous by the Board, sooo this let Morgan out; If thesestories be true, that man Peterson must be dynamlte when he chooses to let himself go, but you'd neyer guess it by looking at him. ooo Something else I heard in Bis- marck from no less a person than Sen. William Langer also had some- thing to do with names. This was the-name of our ate--North Da- kota, which the Senator claims has not been proclaimed properly in song. He said he was tired of not having a catchy song to identify our state and so he set about having one written. In his own inimitable Way'lr. Langer told o the ups and cetved considerable support from dowrm he encountered in hisquest the liberals out the state it1 of a pr ditty for us to be known his recent electio R wua :W. b ' He venito a New York so/i blow, indeed, when he' topedfav  W, dte ahd" suggested that the feI orin Nordhougen and:/Iy thre ] vth!p cute ua with the verve and in with Meier and'BakerifflnllhJ apF6ttle " lcwa Corn Song o . :" ,,,"  /:.:  ' l"bh)in'"Imt .t-ti*tortll Scuttlebutt in Blsm|lR I/d It l rH Rh fli notes agree f8 that now Nordhogu'en has beenld>"the'0J,"butfelt he would b piomised support if he becomes Jrn0re-':ff/ nspired if hehadil candidate for goverli'n'i,l.:Aiii [ lln )nti tej: y 'ab0ut $100 "in s, more scuttlebiitt his lt!!he iib ] s: !kt: pl::?he Senr feR handiwork of 'Se. H Day + Of I fhe price ws a"ltflIe .ep, +but" k Grand Forks warnoted :n' i | Was |ghtyanxious  geta pro'l" move in order to get the' Leeds::man s0ng for lls home state so- he shell: ott bf the way in case Day lectdeS e diout. n due time the song, corn= to run for Congr,ess next year. AnP- pIete;'ith Words & -music, c/me Way, the DemUrs and te I ,alonf arid HIz Honor scrounged Insurgents and the ROC are all mad around and got somebody to play at BurgUm o if he runs agaio in and sing it 'for him. While it dldnt '56. he probably will have to pour rike him as being a $100 worth of i Do it Yourself KENTILE AsphoH TILE 9"x 9" squares in e wde variety of 7 C smart new colors. You can easily do the work yo,rseif. You can buy all you need on our easy terms .... $5.00 per month. CH ROBERTSON IuHMEB ER COMPANY Dial 36601 Vern Chally, Mgr. Park River THERE'S A ROBERTSON YARD NEAR YOU melody, he didn't want to pass his own judgment on it too hasitily so called up ten friends in North Da- kota and had the song presented to them by long distance telephone. They were unanimous in saying the song was a stinkeroo and so it was discarded. ooo Not being a man to give up easily, Sen. Langer tried again and now claims he has hit the jackpot so far as OUR STATE SONG goes. Next Saturday the song will be introduc- ed in the state at the WDAY music festival in Fargo. It will be on TV and the radio and the Senator says he has had 1,000 records made of it. The recordings were made by a group of singers on the Perry Como show known as "The Strangers." Written by Paul Cunningham, with music by Leonard Whitcup and pub- lished by the Remiek Music Corp., of New York, all royalties have been waived and any monies com- ing from the sale of the song will go to the Crippled Children's School at Jamestown, ooo Here are the words for the new song--watch for it on TV and radio from Fargo Saturday, May 21: oOo North Dakota. North Dakota, Where blue skies brighten your way, There's no state half as great And it gets greater ev'ry day, With its mountains and its valleys And stalwart sons on the go, Rolling plains, vast domains, Oh we love North 1kota so With the black gold flowing And the wheat crop growing And the cattle grazing there, With its friendly people looking t'ward a steeple On a house of Prayer. North Dakota. North Dakota, Is really up on its toes, There's no state half as great As the State of the Prairie Rose! o O o Didn't I get an earful in Bis- marck last week end, though? R Smorgasbord ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH Rural Hoople Memorial Day Monday, May 30 Serving 5 to 8 P. M. Adults $1.00. Childrer/ under 12. 50c MENU Ham, Rullepole, Cpld Cuts Lefse, Home Made Rolls, Salads Nbrwegian Flote Grot, Cheese, Fresh Vegetable& Cookies AI'TFAfD SIFL'TOWIIKI FUNEIIL )II IIA&y' Funeral services for J. . Schtle. towski. 88, were he]d Saturday at Mary's church kere / with the Rev. John J. O'Meara officiating. Those from out of town who at- tended the rites were Mr. and Mrs. Joe Pzybiiski. Mrs. Pearl Yutrinka of Argyle, Minn.; Mrs. Andrew. Ro- minski and John Grotzeh of Strand- quEst. Minn., Mr. and Mrs. Vincent Kuznia and son and Anion dish- ovski and daughter and Mrs. Ger- Budishovski of Stephen, Mlrmt., Mr. and Mrs. Jack Johnson. Mayville; Penas of Grand Forks. Mr. Mr. and Mrs. Cecil Curfman of La- Leonard Ottem and son, Roger, verne, N. D, Jennifer and Clinton Philip Penas of Fargo. Nay Crowning Sunday, May 22 Procession Starts 3 P. M. . AT PISEK Baccalaureate Service for Pisek School in Chuh i!nndiately following. + DINNER SERVED BEGINNING AT 5 P. M. THE PUBLIC IS INIVTED St. John Nepomuk Church Pisek, North Dakota Cars Trucks Tractors 1951 Ford Fordor Custom V-8 Radio, Heater, Overdrive, Low Mileage 1950 Ford Custom Tudor V-8 Radio, Heater, Overdrive 1949 Plymouth, Fordor & Tudor Both clean cars - Low Price ".' Wide+Variety '46, '47, '48 models 1951 Ford V-8 -Ton Pickup Low Mileage - Excellent Condition 1938 Ford Truck with box "'H" . 00rpat 0nal Excellent Condition, Good Rubber, with pump 1950 John ne00r"00 + mbWer " BATEMAN MOTORS parR'River, N. Dak.. '- Dial +36271 " 1315 BIRTHDAY SALE MAY 19 20 21 Ocean Spray ,CRANBERRIES, Strained 2 cans 4Sc Dulaney GREEN BEANS, French Style 2 cans 45c Butter Kernel CORN, Cream or Wh. Kernel . 6 cans69c PEAS, Butter Kernel, No. 3 sv. - 6 cans $1.00 TREET, 12 oz can - 39c BEEF STEW, Dinty Moore, 24 oz can - 39c DOG FOOD, Vets canned 11 cans 1.00 BISQUICK 40 oz pkg 43c Devils Food, Spice, White-Marble CAKE MIX, Duncan Hines - 3 pkgs $1.00 SHORTENING, E-Z KREEM, . 3-1b can 7Sc COFFEE FLAV-O-RICH, Ib tin 19 SUGAR 10-1b bag 97 FRESH FROZEN FOOD STRAWBERRIES, Birds Eye, 10-oz 3 pkg 85c PEAS, NORTH STATE, 10-oz 7 pkgs CAULIFLOWER, No. State, 10 oz. - 2 pkgS CUT CORN, North State, 10 oz 2 pkg s MEATS SLAB BACON, by the piece Ib' PORK SAUSAGE Ib SMOKED PORK LINKS Ib YORKSHIRE CERVELAT - I Fruits & Vegetables PASCAL CELERY . bun LEMONS 6 for ORANGES, 288 size 2 doX LETTUCE 2 head GRAPEFRUIT, Ruby Red 3 for WE BUY EGGS WE GIVE .. GREEN STAMPS LOCKERS GROCERIES  F.A ft