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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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May 12, 1955     Walsh County Press
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May 12, 1955
 

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-PAGE TWO WALSH COUNTY PRESS, Editorially Speaking..... If you live in Walsh county, you know we have three hospi- tals, one at Park River and two at Grafton. This being National Hospital Week, we readily acknowledge that we are mighty fortunate to have them. The three hospitals represent healthy financial invest- ments --about a million and a half dollars. That is a lot of money tQ spend for repair shops (if you think of them in that way.) But, in the repair of human bodies and minds, the cus- tomers demand nothing but the best. The carcass is sensitive. The feeling of pain multiplies the need for comfort and atten- tiveness. That means it takes a more elaborate "garage" to ad- minister to the human mechanical troubles than it does to tune up a balky automobile motor. We are lucky that Walsh county is so well equipped. In Park River where this newspaper is published, we are more familiar with St. Ansgar's hospital than the others. To give some idea of the size of the hospital operation, compare these figures with your family budget. To start off with, the hospital itself cost about $500,000. It usually has about 20 em- ployers and its monthly payroll runs to some $4,000. Its food bill alone is $800 a month and it costs approximately $6,000 a year to keep it heated. The bill for electricity runs around $300 a month. That accounts for part of your hospital-cost dollar. Thct there are other items of expense such as office upkeep, surgery, medical, x-ray, anaesthesia and wholesale supply. The charade for a room at St. Ansgar's hospital is $8.50 a day. That includes meals (sometimes lunch between meals) and 24 hours a day service. In many hotels around the state, it costs at last $5 for a room and that does not include meals. That the hospital is operated by a religious group, Sisters of the Order of the Presentation of Mary, apparently has not affected radically its place as a community hospital. The presi- dent of the women's auxiliary is the wife of a local Protestant minister and the auxiliary's membership is made up of women of all faiths. The unit is an organization that worksbut.hard. It spent some $1.200 last year for the hospital on easy chairs for the patients, bed linens, a "blood shaker" and a viewing box used in typing blood. It also does numerous other things, such as providing flowers for special occasions and visiting and remembering patients with gifts on their birthdays while they aze hospitalized. The benefits of a hospital are not confined to status as a healing haven. Businessmen noticeably are aware of that. If a family is in town to take someone to the hospital or to visit a patient, chances are the family will visit the stores, go to a movie or in some other way do a little business. Someone once remarked rather poetically and round- about that some of the world's most desolate creatures have learned the "simple dues of fellowship and social comfort" in hospitals. We are all for social comfort. But neither do we hesi- tate in recommending hospitals as a place to go while getting some good, solid physical comfort if you get a bad pain in the belly, or something worse. PISEK LEGION POST NAMES ANTON ZIDON COMMANDER Anton A. Zidon was named tom- ba. chaplain and Daniel Praska, mander of the American Legion ] sergeant-at-arms. post at Pisek when the group met Retiring officers are Louis Ka- Sunday evening, May 1. chena, commander; George. Chyle. Other officers are Peter Zikmund vice commander; Louis B. Greicar, l adj utant and finance officer; Louis adjutant and finance officer; Albert I Lovcik. chaplain and Stanley Pas- service officer: Emil Kou- I torek, sergeant-alarms. Kaehs.na, J Greater Good of State Served by Higher Pool Level A fight that has been going on for almost 10 years was continued in Washington last week when North Dakota delegations appeared before the House and Senate Appropria- tions subcommittees considering the operating level of Garrison Re- servoir. There is one big difference though. This year the arguments Ior a high level pool will be pre- sented in full and will be backed up by endorsements from counties. cities and rural electric co-ops which will benifit from the use of Garrison Dam to its full capabilities. In the past n few people around Williston h:ve been able to secure amendments to the Garrison appro- pri]tion bills which prohibited fed- eral acquisition of land in the Will- iston area above the 1 340-foot level. The dam has been designed and constructed for a mamu,n operat- level of 1.850 feet above sea level. The Williston intcrests first tried to hgld the pool down to 1,830 feet, and then to ].840. Now their argu- ment is that the government should not take the land until just before it would be flooded. RcI. Usher Burdick cR-NDi, one of the strongest proponents for the love level reservoir, claims that the water won't reach the 1.830-foot mark for five years, so he asks, "'Why not let the people use this 90 thousand acres of some of the best land in North Dakota until it is needed?" In most cases the Army Engine- ers would do just that, by ]easing unflooded lands, with the former owners being given preference. But if the acquisition is delayed five years how is the Bureau of Re- clamation going to know for sure whether to plan irrigation projects to be supplied with water from Garrison Dam? The Bureau would not know whether water would be available at the 1,830 or the 1,850 foot level and that 20-foot diference represents millions of dollars when it comes to digging canals or in- stalling pumping stations. Nor would the Bureau know for sure how much firm hydroelectric power would be supplied by Garri- son Dam to rural electric co-ops. The potential power output per year would be 151 million kilo- watt hours of energy less at 1,840 feet than it would be at 1.850. In addition, all the cities of central and eastern North Dakot l=,ave it major stake in the high--level res- Everything it takes to be"T0PS" 5'1'AN DARD 6ASOLIHES ... he/00ce# for top power, economg, and all "round performance ... and raised to the Highe__00 Octane levels in our historg We are mighty proud of our new gasolines. They have been stepped up to the hig])est octane ratings in our history .. desi6ned to give knock-free per[ormance in tne mos moaern of high compression engines, and older cars as well. But !portant as octane is, good gasolines need something more. hey must be balanced too. S'rANDARD WHITE CROWN and RE]) CROWS Gasolines are balanced to give youtop performance, with controlled volatility--the rign gasoKne for the right seasonwith no vapor lock even in the hottest summer weather.  , Try a tankful of one of these clean-burning, high octane, balanced gasolines today, and prove to yourself that there is a dierence in gasolines, You exnect more from and get itl IT'S NORTH DAKOTA MADE FOR NORTH DAKOTA TRADE Standard Gasoines sold in Horth Dakota are made from North Dakota crude oil and refined by North Dakota citlzas at our DeW Maan Refinery, Hardy' Standard Service Bert Hardy, Prop. "Park River, N.D. Dial 36721 PA RK RIVER, NORTH u.=dKOTA ervoir, because it represents future mumcipal water supply for cities as widely separated as Fargo and Minot. With such a municipal supply as- sured, there would be no limiting factors on the growth of North Da- kota cities. And with irrigation wa- ter available for between one mil- lion and two million acres of land, there would be no limiting the fu- ture expansion of North Dakota's farm economy. There is so much at stake in this question of whether the Gar- rison pool should be 20 feet shal- lower than planned that all of North Dakota must convince Con- gress that the greater good would be served by the higher level. The Fargo Forum. County Agent He,00s By- Robert W. Amstrup County Extension Agent I believe this year more certified small grain was planted than in any other previous year in Walsh coun- ty and therefore. I have received many requests for information on how to keep grain certified. If you have gram that you wish to keep certified you .mus follow the rules and regulatiOiS as set up by the State Seed Department. All the necessary info.rmation for certi- fying your rain can be obtained from my office. Following are a few of the regu- lations: 1. Plant grain on clean land, pre- ferably summerfallow land or clean row crop land. (These are excep- tions, however). 2. Leave a border of at least 10 feet around the field. This border should be cultivated and kept weed free throughout the growing season. 3. You must apply for field in- spection by June 20. Application blanks for this purpose are avail- able at my office. If you do not get this application in by June 20 you can apply until July 5 but there is a cash penalty for all applications submitted between June 20 and July 5. No applications will be ac- cepted after July 5. 4. Cost for field inspection for small grains is 50 cents per acre be- fore June 20 and 60 cents per acre from June 20 to July 5, with a min- imum fee per farm of $5.00 and a minimum per field of $2:00. . 5. Final certlflcation cleaning, tags, etc.. also require special 'care and this information can also be ob- tained from my office. o O o Time to Plant Glads One of the most popular flowers in North Dakota is gladiolus and I suggest you try some this year. The cost and work involved is very small compared to the pleasure one gets from them and for those who have never grown them. Hundreds of varieties of Glads are to be had but a few suggested varieties to try are: Snow Princess. White-Midseason; Maid of Orleans; White-early; Beacon-pink late; Gold Dust, Yellow. Early; Blue Beauty blue. Midseason. Plant glads in any good drained garden soil where they will be pro- tected from the wind and in sunny places. The early part of May is a good time to plant glads but bette.J make several plantings from 15 to June 1. Glad Corms, or "bulbs" as l are commonly, but wrongly, should be planted or set 3 ches deep and six inches the row. If you plant more one row the distance rows should be 28 to 36 incheS, The time to dig up the bulbs is normally during tober, their storage and other tors for care and culture of all given in the Extension A-92 (revised) which is my office and can be dropping me a card. STOP, = BEFORE PAINT YOUR HOUSE Read this MARSHALL-WELLS /00HOUSE PAINT BLISTER-PROOF GUARANTEE DOUBle-YOUR-MONEY- BACK GUARANTEE "You are guaranteed that, when applied according to the easy directions, Marshall.Wells' IMPERIAL House Paint will not be stained by rusting or cor- roding metals, that it will not bc discolored by sulfur-bearing fumes and, further, that it will not form blisters due to moisture, when applied so pre- viously unpainted wood..." IT'S PRINTED ON EVERY CAN OF THIS REVOLUTIONARY PAIN'[ OH YOUR NEW HOME or for your next re-paiN use this sensational new k|nd of house paint. Once you feel the better body spread smoothly and evenly under your brush--once you see its color and beauty live and last you'll never again use a conventional paintl AND NEW IMPERIAl. HOUSE PAINT COSTS NO MORE THAN THE OLD-STYLE PAINTS YOU'VE USED BEFOREI $5.95 Marshall.Wells Stores PARK RIVER. NORTH DAKOTA settle for #W00-R r//E a 1949 engine in your new 1955 truck! Make sure you get it in aim your new truck... ....... Short-itroke engine reduces piston travel, cuts friction. Piston rings last up to 53% longer, Gas savings up to 1 gallon in 7. ONLY FORD gives you a modern Short Stroke engine, V-8 or Six, in truck! Ford T_ripl_e Economy Trucks ' Bateman Motors PARK RiVeR, NORTH DAKOTA M.S.BATEMAN, PROP. Only Ford Dealers Sell Used Cars and DIAL -PAGE TWO WALSH COUNTY PRESS, Editorially Speaking..... If you live in Walsh county, you know we have three hospi- tals, one at Park River and two at Grafton. This being National Hospital Week, we readily acknowledge that we are mighty fortunate to have them. The three hospitals represent healthy financial invest- ments --about a million and a half dollars. That is a lot of money tQ spend for repair shops (if you think of them in that way.) But, in the repair of human bodies and minds, the cus- tomers demand nothing but the best. The carcass is sensitive. The feeling of pain multiplies the need for comfort and atten- tiveness. That means it takes a more elaborate "garage" to ad- minister to the human mechanical troubles than it does to tune up a balky automobile motor. We are lucky that Walsh county is so well equipped. In Park River where this newspaper is published, we are more familiar with St. Ansgar's hospital than the others. To give some idea of the size of the hospital operation, compare these figures with your family budget. To start off with, the hospital itself cost about $500,000. It usually has about 20 em- ployers and its monthly payroll runs to some $4,000. Its food bill alone is $800 a month and it costs approximately $6,000 a year to keep it heated. The bill for electricity runs around $300 a month. That accounts for part of your hospital-cost dollar. Thct there are other items of expense such as office upkeep, surgery, medical, x-ray, anaesthesia and wholesale supply. The charade for a room at St. Ansgar's hospital is $8.50 a day. That includes meals (sometimes lunch between meals) and 24 hours a day service. In many hotels around the state, it costs at last $5 for a room and that does not include meals. That the hospital is operated by a religious group, Sisters of the Order of the Presentation of Mary, apparently has not affected radically its place as a community hospital. The presi- dent of the women's auxiliary is the wife of a local Protestant minister and the auxiliary's membership is made up of women of all faiths. The unit is an organization that worksbut.hard. It spent some $1.200 last year for the hospital on easy chairs for the patients, bed linens, a "blood shaker" and a viewing box used in typing blood. It also does numerous other things, such as providing flowers for special occasions and visiting and remembering patients with gifts on their birthdays while they aze hospitalized. The benefits of a hospital are not confined to status as a healing haven. Businessmen noticeably are aware of that. If a family is in town to take someone to the hospital or to visit a patient, chances are the family will visit the stores, go to a movie or in some other way do a little business. Someone once remarked rather poetically and round- about that some of the world's most desolate creatures have learned the "simple dues of fellowship and social comfort" in hospitals. We are all for social comfort. But neither do we hesi- tate in recommending hospitals as a place to go while getting some good, solid physical comfort if you get a bad pain in the belly, or something worse. PISEK LEGION POST NAMES ANTON ZIDON COMMANDER Anton A. Zidon was named tom- ba. chaplain and Daniel Praska, mander of the American Legion ] sergeant-at-arms. post at Pisek when the group met Retiring officers are Louis Ka- Sunday evening, May 1. chena, commander; George. Chyle. Other officers are Peter Zikmund vice commander; Louis B. Greicar, l adj utant and finance officer; Louis adjutant and finance officer; Albert I Lovcik. chaplain and Stanley Pas- service officer: Emil Kou- I torek, sergeant-alarms. Kaehs.na, J Greater Good of State Served by Higher Pool Level A fight that has been going on for almost 10 years was continued in Washington last week when North Dakota delegations appeared before the House and Senate Appropria- tions subcommittees considering the operating level of Garrison Re- servoir. There is one big difference though. This year the arguments Ior a high level pool will be pre- sented in full and will be backed up by endorsements from counties. cities and rural electric co-ops which will benifit from the use of Garrison Dam to its full capabilities. In the past n few people around Williston h:ve been able to secure amendments to the Garrison appro- pri]tion bills which prohibited fed- eral acquisition of land in the Will- iston area above the 1 340-foot level. The dam has been designed and constructed for a mamu,n operat- level of 1.850 feet above sea level. The Williston intcrests first tried to hgld the pool down to 1,830 feet, and then to ].840. Now their argu- ment is that the government should not take the land until just before it would be flooded. RcI. Usher Burdick cR-NDi, one of the strongest proponents for the love level reservoir, claims that the water won't reach the 1.830-foot mark for five years, so he asks, "'Why not let the people use this 90 thousand acres of some of the best land in North Dakota until it is needed?" In most cases the Army Engine- ers would do just that, by ]easing unflooded lands, with the former owners being given preference. But if the acquisition is delayed five years how is the Bureau of Re- clamation going to know for sure whether to plan irrigation projects to be supplied with water from Garrison Dam? The Bureau would not know whether water would be available at the 1,830 or the 1,850 foot level and that 20-foot diference represents millions of dollars when it comes to digging canals or in- stalling pumping stations. Nor would the Bureau know for sure how much firm hydroelectric power would be supplied by Garri- son Dam to rural electric co-ops. The potential power output per year would be 151 million kilo- watt hours of energy less at 1,840 feet than it would be at 1.850. In addition, all the cities of central and eastern North Dakot l=,ave it major stake in the high--level res- Everything it takes to be"T0PS" 5'1'AN DARD 6ASOLIHES ... he/00ce# for top power, economg, and all "round performance ... and raised to the Highe__00 Octane levels in our historg We are mighty proud of our new gasolines. They have been stepped up to the hig])est octane ratings in our history .. desi6ned to give knock-free per[ormance in tne mos moaern of high compression engines, and older cars as well. But !portant as octane is, good gasolines need something more. hey must be balanced too. S'rANDARD WHITE CROWN and RE]) CROWS Gasolines are balanced to give youtop performance, with controlled volatility--the rign gasoKne for the right seasonwith no vapor lock even in the hottest summer weather.  , Try a tankful of one of these clean-burning, high octane, balanced gasolines today, and prove to yourself that there is a dierence in gasolines, You exnect more from and get itl IT'S NORTH DAKOTA MADE FOR NORTH DAKOTA TRADE Standard Gasoines sold in Horth Dakota are made from North Dakota crude oil and refined by North Dakota citlzas at our DeW Maan Refinery, Hardy' Standard Service Bert Hardy, Prop. "Park River, N.D. Dial 36721 PA RK RIVER, NORTH u.=dKOTA ervoir, because it represents future mumcipal water supply for cities as widely separated as Fargo and Minot. With such a municipal supply as- sured, there would be no limiting factors on the growth of North Da- kota cities. And with irrigation wa- ter available for between one mil- lion and two million acres of land, there would be no limiting the fu- ture expansion of North Dakota's farm economy. There is so much at stake in this question of whether the Gar- rison pool should be 20 feet shal- lower than planned that all of North Dakota must convince Con- gress that the greater good would be served by the higher level. The Fargo Forum. County Agent He,00s By- Robert W. Amstrup County Extension Agent I believe this year more certified small grain was planted than in any other previous year in Walsh coun- ty and therefore. I have received many requests for information on how to keep grain certified. If you have gram that you wish to keep certified you .mus follow the rules and regulatiOiS as set up by the State Seed Department. All the necessary info.rmation for certi- fying your rain can be obtained from my office. Following are a few of the regu- lations: 1. Plant grain on clean land, pre- ferably summerfallow land or clean row crop land. (These are excep- tions, however). 2. Leave a border of at least 10 feet around the field. This border should be cultivated and kept weed free throughout the growing season. 3. You must apply for field in- spection by June 20. Application blanks for this purpose are avail- able at my office. If you do not get this application in by June 20 you can apply until July 5 but there is a cash penalty for all applications submitted between June 20 and July 5. No applications will be ac- cepted after July 5. 4. Cost for field inspection for small grains is 50 cents per acre be- fore June 20 and 60 cents per acre from June 20 to July 5, with a min- imum fee per farm of $5.00 and a minimum per field of $2:00. . 5. Final certlflcation cleaning, tags, etc.. also require special 'care and this information can also be ob- tained from my office. o O o Time to Plant Glads One of the most popular flowers in North Dakota is gladiolus and I suggest you try some this year. The cost and work involved is very small compared to the pleasure one gets from them and for those who have never grown them. Hundreds of varieties of Glads are to be had but a few suggested varieties to try are: Snow Princess. White-Midseason; Maid of Orleans; White-early; Beacon-pink late; Gold Dust, Yellow. Early; Blue Beauty blue. Midseason. Plant glads in any good drained garden soil where they will be pro- tected from the wind and in sunny places. The early part of May is a good time to plant glads but bette.J make several plantings from 15 to June 1. Glad Corms, or "bulbs" as l are commonly, but wrongly, should be planted or set 3 ches deep and six inches the row. If you plant more one row the distance rows should be 28 to 36 incheS, The time to dig up the bulbs is normally during tober, their storage and other tors for care and culture of all given in the Extension A-92 (revised) which is my office and can be dropping me a card. STOP, = BEFORE PAINT YOUR HOUSE Read this MARSHALL-WELLS /00HOUSE PAINT BLISTER-PROOF GUARANTEE DOUBle-YOUR-MONEY- BACK GUARANTEE "You are guaranteed that, when applied according to the easy directions, Marshall.Wells' IMPERIAL House Paint will not be stained by rusting or cor- roding metals, that it will not bc discolored by sulfur-bearing fumes and, further, that it will not form blisters due to moisture, when applied so pre- viously unpainted wood..." IT'S PRINTED ON EVERY CAN OF THIS REVOLUTIONARY PAIN'[ OH YOUR NEW HOME or for your next re-paiN use this sensational new k|nd of house paint. Once you feel the better body spread smoothly and evenly under your brush--once you see its color and beauty live and last you'll never again use a conventional paintl AND NEW IMPERIAl. HOUSE PAINT COSTS NO MORE THAN THE OLD-STYLE PAINTS YOU'VE USED BEFOREI $5.95 Marshall.Wells Stores PARK RIVER. NORTH DAKOTA settle for #W00-R r//E a 1949 engine in your new 1955 truck! Make sure you get it in aim your new truck... ....... Short-itroke engine reduces piston travel, cuts friction. Piston rings last up to 53% longer, Gas savings up to 1 gallon in 7. ONLY FORD gives you a modern Short Stroke engine, V-8 or Six, in truck! Ford T_ripl_e Economy Trucks ' Bateman Motors PARK RiVeR, NORTH DAKOTA M.S.BATEMAN, PROP. Only Ford Dealers Sell Used Cars and DIAL