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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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March 8, 1956     Walsh County Press
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March 8, 1956
 

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THIS ISSUE HAS EIGHT PAGES WALSH COUNTY00000000 PR S THIS IUE , WILL REACH 5,6O0 READERS 73 PARK  W,T.H COUNTY, N. D. THURSDAY, MAP 8, 1956 NUMBER 4 County FFA, 4-H Teams Place at Valley City Winter Show Walsh County 4-H and FFA tional FFA competition in Kansas won an imposing string of City. The team received a gold honors over the week and at award in the national contest. Valley City 4-H and FFA live- The WCAS livestock judging and grain judging contests team, coached by vocational agri- m conjunction with the annual culture instructor M. G. Lannoye, City Winter Show. won fourth place in the team corn- Miller High Individual petition last week at the Wintez In the Future Farmers of America Show. There were 48 FFA teams judging competition, Bob and approximately 220 individuals won the "high over all" in- competing in livestock judging. The award. arrison team won first, Mort, sec- Bob is a sophomore at the Walsh ond; Mohall was third and Medina Agricultural School in Park was fifth. and is a son of Mr. and Mrs. The Waish County School's FFA Miller of Fordville. Last year team was high team in swine judg- was one of the three high indi- ing with Miller tied for third in in sheep judging at the Val- individual scoring. City show and was named to Other members of the William livestock judging team which A. Broyles team besides Miller, the state in the Na- were: Gerald Puppe, Hensel, Den- nis Riske, Minto. Alternates were Jim Miller and Gary McLaughlin, About $7,000 Lankin Tops in Crop Judging Finish Payment A WCAS FFA team also took top honors in crops judging. The team, Sales Ring coached by vocational ag instructor $7,000 is needed to take Howard Gordon, won a gold award. of remaining bills on the Park And one of the team members: Livestock Sales pavilion, Fred Charles Hodek, Jr., of Lankin was reported at the Park Rive]: singled out for a gold award in in- Club meeting Thurs- dividual competition. Members of the WCAS gold award crops judging team besides cost of the new building Hodek were his brother, Joe, and be approximately $30,000 (in- the cost of painting the Joseph Zahradka, Lawton. Both this spring) Zahradka and Joe Hodek received club's li ...... " silver awards as individuals. *socz committee is Approximately 50 teams, compris- a final drive to solicit ad- ed of some 220 members, competed the remaningmVestments$7,000necessarYin bills, to in crop judging. The contestants also was reported that the sales had to identify weed plants and seeds as well as the common crop had its biggest sale to date plants and seeds in the state. An- Wednesday (Feb. 28). A total some 230 head of livestock went other part of the contest consisted the ring130 head of cat- of rating samples of grain as to and 100 hogs. their quality, and the third part of other business President Floyd the contest involved identification reported on efforts to assist in of about 20 marketing factors, such a site for a local clinic. The as why 'ain may be graded down also discussed the possibility when it gets to the elevator). A ApPreciation Day to nerfect score in ;the contest would date in order not to conflict be 1,100 points. Charles' Hodek's weekly livestock sale on total ws 1.012 points. and the committee in RonId Unke oi' Hen1 lso was of the event was instructed one of the WCAS contestants in a meeting of participating cro-s tudginm to consider the change Gordon said that officials at the to consider revising the Winter Show declared this was one Day setup, of the hihest caliber contests in veers--that some winners o.s ffod awards last year. for example, [ Tll thlsqo muehVerhiner.besuse the scores were than 50 persons spent the Walsh 4-H'Team Among Top Park River Saturday learn- Walsh county's 4-H team entry ways to have fun and placed fifth in over-all scoring meetings and parties, among the 65 teams entered in live- was the first recreation work- stock judging. Dickey county was by the Walsh Coun- first. Traill county, second and Union. Mrs. Howard third: Kidder. fourth. "Over-all" of Fairdale. county Farm- refers to the total score in beef, recreational director, con- sheep and swine judging with thre Workship which included classes of each. m such activities as par- Firs! in Sheep Judging folk dances, relays, con- The Walsh team took first place in group singing and in shhep judging. was conducted by Orville Aune of Fairdale was of Tolna and Lor- high individual in sheep judging. of Minot, field workers He is a member of the Walsh team FU state office. --the O & S Hustlers of Edinburg. began in the morn- Other members of the team were in the afternon with Jerome Axvig and Floyd Aune. Joe lunch, and was follow- a "Family Fun Night" Axvig is leader of the O & S Hust- lers 4-H club and Walter Aune is Public. Other Farmers associate leader. embers assisting in direct- recreation were Mrs. A team consists of three members, Park River, Mrs. ] but two other members from Walsh Mrs. Albert Gher- county also competed in the 4-H Ernest Lofthus, all of livestock judging. They were Ro- t bert Bergcmist and Glenn Okeson. members of the Happy Hustlers 4-H club of the Adams-Fairdale area. Gives WCAS The club's leader and associate " ecredltation lender are Lloyd Hilde and Vernon Vetas, both of Fairdale. County Agricultural been notified that it s been classified as a "fully school by the state Dakota State department of instruction. Smith. WCAS superintend- says the rating is the highest by the state department. In the school of its rating, Smith said, the state report that the new building will the plant defficieneies with the exception locker and dressing room facili- which are below standard. Walsh County School also been a member of the North Association of Secondary and Colleges. receiving its "unqualified approval", rating. North Central associa- not released its ratings for current year. Jesse Bates was in Park visiting relatives over te end. He is stationed with the in Brubakken, Germany. He to Prk River from Lyons, While on emergency leave the illnes and death of J. Bates at the army at Bryon, Texas. County Extension A-ent Robert Amstrup accompanied the five 4-H club members to Valley City. The Busy Beavers 4-H club also prticip,ted Jn the grain judging contest but Amtru) sid that he hd not been notified of the results of *he contest as of yesterday. The B-v Bever tm wa ac- eomn,n;d by their club leaders. Mark Midgarden and Nels Midgard- en Amstruu sid that a total of 436 'FA nd 4-H members cmaeted in the V.lley City comnetition. The breakdown on th;s wa, 1 4-H members and 220 FFA members. (00emeterY Groun Sets Annual Meet The Park River Cemetery AssO- ciation will have its annual meeting next Tuesday, March 13. The meeting is scheduled to start romptly at 7 p. m. in the city hall basement and is expected to last lss than an hour. President Charles Hrris says there will be an im- portant discussion of plans for the development of the new area in the cemetery which has been sur- veyed and plotted Hav#:a Winter Check-up Is Your Fire Insurance t,,. FromPhillipines Call fo Bid Pool, Filtration PI t ... to ,nro.. S r s on an At County School The Park River city council set ed the city of late. At present the will negotiate with the Bank of A school principal from the Phil- lipine Islands is going to "enroll" at the Walsh County Agricultural School in Park River this month. His intention is to study the WC- AS program and methods of teach- ng agricultural subjects and help apply that knowledge in shaping the vocational agricultural instruc- tion system in his own country's schools. Pedro A. Venture, 43, principal of the Masbate National Agricultnr. al School, Phillipine Islands, is scheduled to spend two weeks at WCAS starting March 17, according to word received by Supt. F. U. Smith. Ventural is one of a group of Phil- lipine educators sent to this country to work with teachers and the na- tional office of education in pre- paring subject matter and curricula for their own vocational agricultur- al education program. Ventura is spending 10 months in this country. He went first to Louisiana State university and re- cently came to Maddock, N. D., to observe the Benson county voca- I tional agricultural school setup I there. When he leaves WCAS, Smith says, the visiting educator will enroll at North Dakota Agri- cultural College in Fargo for the spring quarter. During his time at Park River, his studies also probably will in- clude visits to some of the farms in the area and the Langdon experi- mental station. Ventura's .trip is being made through the office of international education, U. S. Office of Education, assisted by the Inter- national Cooperation Administra- tion. I W. D. Hanrahan Dies After Illness William D. Hanrahan, 63, promi- nent Minto business man and civic leader, died early Feb. 27, at his home after an extended illness. Mr. Hanrahan was born at Kemp- ton, N. D., Aug. 16, 1892, and grad- uated from the Larimore high school. He enlisted for service in World War I at Billings, Mont., Dec. 11, 1917, and was sent to Fort George Wright. Wash., and later served, in the 53rd Provisional Re- cruit Squadr6 of the Waco, Texas. aviation camp. When discharged at Fort D. A. Russel, Wyo., June 28, 1918, he was a corporal with the 344th Field Artillery. He served overseas from July 6, 1918, to June 15. 1919. Mr. Hanrahan came to Minto in 1924 from Thomnson, N. D.. and was manager of the National Grair Elevator until in 1927 when he be- came grain manager and buyer for the Farmers Co-orerative Elevabr a position he held until his retire- ment in 1955. Survivors. include his wife, the former Verda Hawkland: four daughters, Mrs. R. E. Hewitt of Spokane. Wash.. Mrs. Shanley Campbell of Fro. nd Mis Jean Hanrahn and Mrs. C. Robert John- n. bth nf Minto: a sister. Mrs. EH-,beth Fo of Santa Ana. Calif.. nd 11 grandchildren. Toastmasters Pick Judges for ConteSt The Park River Toastmasters club Monday elected John Flaten and Paul Meberg as judges for the Area Toastmasters speech contest to be held March 19 in Grafton. Rossford Johnson was toastmaster for the dinner meeting which was held in the Catholic church base- ment. Ronnie Hagen was topiemast- or. John Flaten and Lee Neste were main sp[akers., Flatten ,talked on "Big Town" while the subject of Neste's talk was "Earth Satellite Vehicles and You". Arden Buridge was master evalu- ator and Earl Garder was topic evaluator. Gordon Ramsey and Lou- is Moo were speech evaluators. Rossford Johnson gave a report from the nominating committee and announced that election of officers will be held at the next meeting. Thirteen members and two guests were present. Guests were Bart Hankey and M. H. Larson. WEATHER REPORT More snow and cold has been the weather program here this week. A total of 4% inches of new snow fell Saturday night and Tuesday. High wind and storm conditions, with re- sulting blocked and icy roads kept travel to a minimum Tuesday and Wednesday. High temperature for the week was 35 above on Sunday with the low, 3 below, yesterday. Spring is still scheduled to arrive March 21. CHAPMAN the dates for bid openings on the local proposed swimming pool and the water treatment plant. Meeting in regular session Mon- day the council authorized the city auditor to advertise for bids on both projects beginning March 8. Bids will be opened on the swimming pool March 28 at 8 p. m., while those on the water treatment plant will be opened April 2 at 8 p. m. In approving the motion to ac- cept the plans and specifications for water treatment and purifies- city receives its water supply from a well but finds it increasingly dif- ficult to meet the demand. Through the use of the proposed filtration plant, the city would take its water directly from the river, thereby be- ing assured of a sufficient supply. The water would also be "softened" through a treatment process. The Grand Forks engineering firm, MacKichan and Associates, es- timates the cost of the project will range from $70,000-$75,000; utilizing some of the facilities of the power- North Dakota for $50,000 in ]:evenue bonds. The bonds dated Aug. 1, w ill be retired over a period of 10 years. The council discussed proposed rat- es but stated that there would be no changes until the plant is ready for operation. At a special session Thursday, the council approved the plans for three alternate bids on the swim- ming pool project. The specifica- tions presented by engineer Lloyd Richmond, Grand Forks, provide for a pool with dimensions of 35 tion equipment, the council took house. Present plans call for the x 75 f.eet and a depth of two feet another step in solving the water building to be remodeled, at the shallow end, with an alter- ci- [nate bid calling for a 7V2 foot ex- supply problem which has confront- The council indigatedthat the t tension on the same grade to a minimum depth of 18 inches. Also, Fi[i E[ |i an alternate bid on a pool 40 feet x .g Deadline Near for ec on 97 feet with aminimum depth of 18 inches. In all instances, no roof The deadline for filing petitions by candidates for office in the April 2 city elections is next Tuesday, March 13, according to City Auditor Elsie Catherwood. The deadline or filing nominat- ing petitions is 20 days before the city election. To be elected this year are three aldermen, a justice of peace, police Red Cross Drive To Begin March 12 The annual Red Cross fund-rais- ing drive will be conducted in Park River next week, March 12-17 The Book and Discussion club which is handling the drive this year, set the dates Tuesday at the club's regular meeting. Mrs. Art Meagher has been ap- pointed genel-al chairman of the city drive. Mrs. Duncan Meagher gave the lesson on "The Negro in America", reviewing the experiences of two Minneapolis Tribune reports recent- ly when they wrote a series of ar- ticles .entitled "Dixie Divided". Aft- er reviewing the negro's part in American history, Mrs. Meagher touched on the Supreme court's ex- plosive de-segregation ruling and some of the recent developments including the negros' bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., and squabble surrounding the attempts of the ne coed, ". Autherine Lucy,.to enter the University of Alabama. Club members answered roll call by giving brief biographies of fam- ous negros. Lunch was served. The business meeting was conducted by Mrs. Elmer Argetsinger, president. Remind Wool Men of ASC Regulations Despite the efforts to get details of the new wool program to wool growers, reports reaching the Walsh County Agricultural Stabilization arid Conservation Office indicate that at least a few growers will be disappointed when their wool in- centive payment is received The disappointment will result from failure of growers to realize the often emphasized point that the size of the incentive payment depends on the price received for the wool. With the second wool marketing year under the new program start- ing April 1, 1956, Oscar J. Westby, Chairman of the Walsh County Ag- ricultural Stabilization and Conser- vation Committee again points out that the more the grower gets when he sells his wool the greater will be his incentive payment--the lowex lower the sale price, the smaller the payment. Here;s the way Chairman Westby explains it. The payment will not be determined until the 1955-clip sales records are in. The payment to the grower will be based upon the percentage needed to bring the National average return to wool growers to 62 cents a pound. The words "National average" are signi- ficant. So is "percentage". If it fig- ures out that a 15-percent payment is needed to bring the National av- erage return to 62 cents per pound, the grower will get a payment bas- ed on 15 percent of what he receiv- ed when he sold his wool. It is recognized that the 1955 crop, with few exceptions, has been sold. Nothing can be done about that. But another season is at hand and the new marketing year will begin April 1. It is for that reason that the chairman emphasizes again "the more you get when you sell your wool, the greater will be your wool payment." Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Bernston and children. Steven and Brent, spent the week end in Valley City with his mother Mrs. Bernt Bernston. magistrate and one member on the Park board. Expiring this year are terms of ward; and Harold Dougherty, thi-d Alderman David Mebzrg, frs' ward. ' Holdovers on the council are Mayor M. O. Johnson and Aldermen John Bures, Dr. W. E. Cowger and M. S. Bateman. Mrs. J. Danlelski Dies at Mlnto Mrs. John Danielski, 75, died Feb. 29 at her home in Minto. A fire in her home shortly before that time, injured her slightly and is believed to have brought on a fatal heart attack. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Steltman, she was born in Perham, Minn., May 10, 1880, and came to the Warsaw area with her parents about 72 years ago. She was married to John Daniel- ski at Warsaw Jan. 17, 1898. Survivors are two daughters, Mrs. Adam Stoltman (Frances), Oslo, and Mrs. Bernard N'arloch (Julia), Min- to; three sons, John at home, Julius of Detroit, and Harry of San Diego, Calif.; 13 grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Her husband died in 1951. 4-H Leaders Meet In P R March 15 A county 4-H leadere training meeting for 4-H agricu!tural readers and associate leaders will be held at Park River next Thursday, March 15. The meeting starts at 1:30 p. m. in the city hall basement. John J. Zaylskie, extension forest- er from the State College Station at Fargo, will be in charge of the meeting, giving demonstrations on safety, engineering and horticulture. The information and material which the leaders will get will be is to be erected over the bath house. In other business the council: * Instructed a committee com- prised of Aldermen Bures, Meberg and Dougherty, to purchase an aerial ladder for the city. The com- mittee was appointed at a previous meeting to investigate prices and i types. ! -k Made a motion to acknow- i ledge the Great Northern Railway's transfer of deed for the old water tower to the city. * Instructed the City Treasurer to insure three units of the city fleet for the remainder of 1958 and the following year. Heard a statement by Mayor M. O. Johnson that he had ordered two carloads of cement with deliv- ery as soon as possible. PSC To Conduct Phone Hearing A public hearing will be held at the court house in Grafton Wednes- day, March .14, by Public Service Commissioner Martin Vaaler on an application of Polar Rural Tele- phone Mutual Aid Corporation of Grafton to take over four phone companies. In its application, the Polar Cor- poration asks permission to pur- chase the Edinburg-Gardar Tele- phone Co., of Edinburg, the St. Thomas Rural Telephone Co,, the Glasston Mutal Telephone Co,, and the South Carlisld Telephone Co., Hamilton. Polar also seeks ission to make a clrge of 25 cents per month for dial service furnished non-members and to establish a minimum monthly guarantee of $7.50 for each semi-public phone. It also wishes to discontinue furnish- ing extended area service between exchanges at Hoople and St. Thom- as. The hearing has been set to re- ceive information and testimony by all parties concerned. It will begin used to train their 4-H club mere- at 9:30 a. m., aCcording to Elmer bers for the balance 0f the current Olson, the commission's secretary. club year. Vaaler will be accompanied to In addition to the leaders and as- sociate leaders, County Extension Agent Robert Amstrup said older members of the 4-H clubs also are invited to attend the training meet- ing. W00lsh Educators On Review Board Walsh County Agricultural School Superintendent F. U. Smith and Grafton High School Supt. James Maxwell have been appointed to serve on a reviewing committee of the North Dakota Central Associa- tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Smith and Maxwell will be among a dozen or so North Dakota educators on North Central associa- tion committees which study school reports, seeing that certain stand- ards are maintained if a school is to keep its accreditation by the North Central association. Smith al- so was one of the North Dakotans on the committees last year. The committees are to meet at lhe North Central association's annual sesion April 9-13 at Chicago. In Region 3 Finals Defending Class C Champion Os- nabrock and Hannah will mee in the finals of the Region 3 basketball tournament tonight at 7:30 in Park Grafton by Clarence Bryant, the commission's chief engineer. WHAT'S DOING March 8: Walsh Co. NPL conven- tion, 2 P. M., Park River city hall. March 9, Walsh Co. Republican convention. 2 p. m. Courthouse at Grafton. March 9: St. Ansgar's Hospital Auxiliary meets. March 9: Garden Club meets at Mrs. I. E. Hansen's home 2 P. M. March 12-17: Red Cross fund drive in Park River. March 12: American Legion Aux- iliary meets 8 p. m. at the Legion hall. Party for members of the Am- erican Legion to follow March 12: American Legion Aux- iliary meets 8 p. m. in eLgion hall. Birthday party for the American Legion members same night at 9. March 13: Park River Cemetery association meets. 7 p. m. City hall b.sement March 14: The Federated Guild will meet at the home of Mrs. IV/. S. Bateman. March 15: Walsh County 4-H leaders training meeting. 1:30 p. m., Park River city hall. March 15: Presbyterian Mission- ary will meet in Federated church parlors. River. March 19: Harmony Homemakers Osnabrock downed Fordville 50- at Mrs. Fred Silliman's Postponed 40 and Hannah beat Brocket 46-34 from March 5. in elimination playoffs last night. March 20: Waish Co. and Three The tournament was to have open- ed a day earlier but was postponed because of bad weather. PARK RIVER GRAIN MARKET Flax $3.31; wheat $2.13; durum, t $2.35; oats 47e; barley 65c to $I.O0 Buy U. S. Sevings Bonds Today! Rivers Soil Conservation elecion of supervisors. March 20: Township and village elections. March 28: Easter Seal Drive. March 21: Walsh County Wildlife Federation "Stag Night", Grafton armory. See Us Abolrl: Our New lud00t Life Insurance THIS ISSUE HAS EIGHT PAGES WALSH COUNTY00000000 PR S THIS IUE , WILL REACH 5,6O0 READERS 73 PARK  W,T.H COUNTY, N. D. THURSDAY, MAP 8, 1956 NUMBER 4 County FFA, 4-H Teams Place at Valley City Winter Show Walsh County 4-H and FFA tional FFA competition in Kansas won an imposing string of City. The team received a gold honors over the week and at award in the national contest. Valley City 4-H and FFA live- The WCAS livestock judging and grain judging contests team, coached by vocational agri- m conjunction with the annual culture instructor M. G. Lannoye, City Winter Show. won fourth place in the team corn- Miller High Individual petition last week at the Wintez In the Future Farmers of America Show. There were 48 FFA teams judging competition, Bob and approximately 220 individuals won the "high over all" in- competing in livestock judging. The award. arrison team won first, Mort, sec- Bob is a sophomore at the Walsh ond; Mohall was third and Medina Agricultural School in Park was fifth. and is a son of Mr. and Mrs. The Waish County School's FFA Miller of Fordville. Last year team was high team in swine judg- was one of the three high indi- ing with Miller tied for third in in sheep judging at the Val- individual scoring. City show and was named to Other members of the William livestock judging team which A. Broyles team besides Miller, the state in the Na- were: Gerald Puppe, Hensel, Den- nis Riske, Minto. Alternates were Jim Miller and Gary McLaughlin, About $7,000 Lankin Tops in Crop Judging Finish Payment A WCAS FFA team also took top honors in crops judging. The team, Sales Ring coached by vocational ag instructor $7,000 is needed to take Howard Gordon, won a gold award. of remaining bills on the Park And one of the team members: Livestock Sales pavilion, Fred Charles Hodek, Jr., of Lankin was reported at the Park Rive]: singled out for a gold award in in- Club meeting Thurs- dividual competition. Members of the WCAS gold award crops judging team besides cost of the new building Hodek were his brother, Joe, and be approximately $30,000 (in- the cost of painting the Joseph Zahradka, Lawton. Both this spring) Zahradka and Joe Hodek received club's li ...... " silver awards as individuals. *socz committee is Approximately 50 teams, compris- a final drive to solicit ad- ed of some 220 members, competed the remaningmVestments$7,000necessarYin bills, to in crop judging. The contestants also was reported that the sales had to identify weed plants and seeds as well as the common crop had its biggest sale to date plants and seeds in the state. An- Wednesday (Feb. 28). A total some 230 head of livestock went other part of the contest consisted the ring130 head of cat- of rating samples of grain as to and 100 hogs. their quality, and the third part of other business President Floyd the contest involved identification reported on efforts to assist in of about 20 marketing factors, such a site for a local clinic. The as why 'ain may be graded down also discussed the possibility when it gets to the elevator). A ApPreciation Day to nerfect score in ;the contest would date in order not to conflict be 1,100 points. Charles' Hodek's weekly livestock sale on total ws 1.012 points. and the committee in RonId Unke oi' Hen1 lso was of the event was instructed one of the WCAS contestants in a meeting of participating cro-s tudginm to consider the change Gordon said that officials at the to consider revising the Winter Show declared this was one Day setup, of the hihest caliber contests in veers--that some winners o.s ffod awards last year. for example, [ Tll thlsqo muehVerhiner.besuse the scores were than 50 persons spent the Walsh 4-H'Team Among Top Park River Saturday learn- Walsh county's 4-H team entry ways to have fun and placed fifth in over-all scoring meetings and parties, among the 65 teams entered in live- was the first recreation work- stock judging. Dickey county was by the Walsh Coun- first. Traill county, second and Union. Mrs. Howard third: Kidder. fourth. "Over-all" of Fairdale. county Farm- refers to the total score in beef, recreational director, con- sheep and swine judging with thre Workship which included classes of each. m such activities as par- Firs! in Sheep Judging folk dances, relays, con- The Walsh team took first place in group singing and in shhep judging. was conducted by Orville Aune of Fairdale was of Tolna and Lor- high individual in sheep judging. of Minot, field workers He is a member of the Walsh team FU state office. --the O & S Hustlers of Edinburg. began in the morn- Other members of the team were in the afternon with Jerome Axvig and Floyd Aune. Joe lunch, and was follow- a "Family Fun Night" Axvig is leader of the O & S Hust- lers 4-H club and Walter Aune is Public. Other Farmers associate leader. embers assisting in direct- recreation were Mrs. A team consists of three members, Park River, Mrs. ] but two other members from Walsh Mrs. Albert Gher- county also competed in the 4-H Ernest Lofthus, all of livestock judging. They were Ro- t bert Bergcmist and Glenn Okeson. members of the Happy Hustlers 4-H club of the Adams-Fairdale area. Gives WCAS The club's leader and associate " ecredltation lender are Lloyd Hilde and Vernon Vetas, both of Fairdale. County Agricultural been notified that it s been classified as a "fully school by the state Dakota State department of instruction. Smith. WCAS superintend- says the rating is the highest by the state department. In the school of its rating, Smith said, the state report that the new building will the plant defficieneies with the exception locker and dressing room facili- which are below standard. Walsh County School also been a member of the North Association of Secondary and Colleges. receiving its "unqualified approval", rating. North Central associa- not released its ratings for current year. Jesse Bates was in Park visiting relatives over te end. He is stationed with the in Brubakken, Germany. He to Prk River from Lyons, While on emergency leave the illnes and death of J. Bates at the army at Bryon, Texas. County Extension A-ent Robert Amstrup accompanied the five 4-H club members to Valley City. The Busy Beavers 4-H club also prticip,ted Jn the grain judging contest but Amtru) sid that he hd not been notified of the results of *he contest as of yesterday. The B-v Bever tm wa ac- eomn,n;d by their club leaders. Mark Midgarden and Nels Midgard- en Amstruu sid that a total of 436 'FA nd 4-H members cmaeted in the V.lley City comnetition. The breakdown on th;s wa, 1 4-H members and 220 FFA members. (00emeterY Groun Sets Annual Meet The Park River Cemetery AssO- ciation will have its annual meeting next Tuesday, March 13. The meeting is scheduled to start romptly at 7 p. m. in the city hall basement and is expected to last lss than an hour. President Charles Hrris says there will be an im- portant discussion of plans for the development of the new area in the cemetery which has been sur- veyed and plotted Hav#:a Winter Check-up Is Your Fire Insurance t,,. FromPhillipines Call fo Bid Pool, Filtration PI t ... to ,nro.. S r s on an At County School The Park River city council set ed the city of late. At present the will negotiate with the Bank of A school principal from the Phil- lipine Islands is going to "enroll" at the Walsh County Agricultural School in Park River this month. His intention is to study the WC- AS program and methods of teach- ng agricultural subjects and help apply that knowledge in shaping the vocational agricultural instruc- tion system in his own country's schools. Pedro A. Venture, 43, principal of the Masbate National Agricultnr. al School, Phillipine Islands, is scheduled to spend two weeks at WCAS starting March 17, according to word received by Supt. F. U. Smith. Ventural is one of a group of Phil- lipine educators sent to this country to work with teachers and the na- tional office of education in pre- paring subject matter and curricula for their own vocational agricultur- al education program. Ventura is spending 10 months in this country. He went first to Louisiana State university and re- cently came to Maddock, N. D., to observe the Benson county voca- I tional agricultural school setup I there. When he leaves WCAS, Smith says, the visiting educator will enroll at North Dakota Agri- cultural College in Fargo for the spring quarter. During his time at Park River, his studies also probably will in- clude visits to some of the farms in the area and the Langdon experi- mental station. Ventura's .trip is being made through the office of international education, U. S. Office of Education, assisted by the Inter- national Cooperation Administra- tion. I W. D. Hanrahan Dies After Illness William D. Hanrahan, 63, promi- nent Minto business man and civic leader, died early Feb. 27, at his home after an extended illness. Mr. Hanrahan was born at Kemp- ton, N. D., Aug. 16, 1892, and grad- uated from the Larimore high school. He enlisted for service in World War I at Billings, Mont., Dec. 11, 1917, and was sent to Fort George Wright. Wash., and later served, in the 53rd Provisional Re- cruit Squadr6 of the Waco, Texas. aviation camp. When discharged at Fort D. A. Russel, Wyo., June 28, 1918, he was a corporal with the 344th Field Artillery. He served overseas from July 6, 1918, to June 15. 1919. Mr. Hanrahan came to Minto in 1924 from Thomnson, N. D.. and was manager of the National Grair Elevator until in 1927 when he be- came grain manager and buyer for the Farmers Co-orerative Elevabr a position he held until his retire- ment in 1955. Survivors. include his wife, the former Verda Hawkland: four daughters, Mrs. R. E. Hewitt of Spokane. Wash.. Mrs. Shanley Campbell of Fro. nd Mis Jean Hanrahn and Mrs. C. Robert John- n. bth nf Minto: a sister. Mrs. EH-,beth Fo of Santa Ana. Calif.. nd 11 grandchildren. Toastmasters Pick Judges for ConteSt The Park River Toastmasters club Monday elected John Flaten and Paul Meberg as judges for the Area Toastmasters speech contest to be held March 19 in Grafton. Rossford Johnson was toastmaster for the dinner meeting which was held in the Catholic church base- ment. Ronnie Hagen was topiemast- or. John Flaten and Lee Neste were main sp[akers., Flatten ,talked on "Big Town" while the subject of Neste's talk was "Earth Satellite Vehicles and You". Arden Buridge was master evalu- ator and Earl Garder was topic evaluator. Gordon Ramsey and Lou- is Moo were speech evaluators. Rossford Johnson gave a report from the nominating committee and announced that election of officers will be held at the next meeting. Thirteen members and two guests were present. Guests were Bart Hankey and M. H. Larson. WEATHER REPORT More snow and cold has been the weather program here this week. A total of 4% inches of new snow fell Saturday night and Tuesday. High wind and storm conditions, with re- sulting blocked and icy roads kept travel to a minimum Tuesday and Wednesday. High temperature for the week was 35 above on Sunday with the low, 3 below, yesterday. Spring is still scheduled to arrive March 21. CHAPMAN the dates for bid openings on the local proposed swimming pool and the water treatment plant. Meeting in regular session Mon- day the council authorized the city auditor to advertise for bids on both projects beginning March 8. Bids will be opened on the swimming pool March 28 at 8 p. m., while those on the water treatment plant will be opened April 2 at 8 p. m. In approving the motion to ac- cept the plans and specifications for water treatment and purifies- city receives its water supply from a well but finds it increasingly dif- ficult to meet the demand. Through the use of the proposed filtration plant, the city would take its water directly from the river, thereby be- ing assured of a sufficient supply. The water would also be "softened" through a treatment process. The Grand Forks engineering firm, MacKichan and Associates, es- timates the cost of the project will range from $70,000-$75,000; utilizing some of the facilities of the power- North Dakota for $50,000 in ]:evenue bonds. The bonds dated Aug. 1, w ill be retired over a period of 10 years. The council discussed proposed rat- es but stated that there would be no changes until the plant is ready for operation. At a special session Thursday, the council approved the plans for three alternate bids on the swim- ming pool project. The specifica- tions presented by engineer Lloyd Richmond, Grand Forks, provide for a pool with dimensions of 35 tion equipment, the council took house. Present plans call for the x 75 f.eet and a depth of two feet another step in solving the water building to be remodeled, at the shallow end, with an alter- ci- [nate bid calling for a 7V2 foot ex- supply problem which has confront- The council indigatedthat the t tension on the same grade to a minimum depth of 18 inches. Also, Fi[i E[ |i an alternate bid on a pool 40 feet x .g Deadline Near for ec on 97 feet with aminimum depth of 18 inches. In all instances, no roof The deadline for filing petitions by candidates for office in the April 2 city elections is next Tuesday, March 13, according to City Auditor Elsie Catherwood. The deadline or filing nominat- ing petitions is 20 days before the city election. To be elected this year are three aldermen, a justice of peace, police Red Cross Drive To Begin March 12 The annual Red Cross fund-rais- ing drive will be conducted in Park River next week, March 12-17 The Book and Discussion club which is handling the drive this year, set the dates Tuesday at the club's regular meeting. Mrs. Art Meagher has been ap- pointed genel-al chairman of the city drive. Mrs. Duncan Meagher gave the lesson on "The Negro in America", reviewing the experiences of two Minneapolis Tribune reports recent- ly when they wrote a series of ar- ticles .entitled "Dixie Divided". Aft- er reviewing the negro's part in American history, Mrs. Meagher touched on the Supreme court's ex- plosive de-segregation ruling and some of the recent developments including the negros' bus boycott in Montgomery, Ala., and squabble surrounding the attempts of the ne coed, ". Autherine Lucy,.to enter the University of Alabama. Club members answered roll call by giving brief biographies of fam- ous negros. Lunch was served. The business meeting was conducted by Mrs. Elmer Argetsinger, president. Remind Wool Men of ASC Regulations Despite the efforts to get details of the new wool program to wool growers, reports reaching the Walsh County Agricultural Stabilization arid Conservation Office indicate that at least a few growers will be disappointed when their wool in- centive payment is received The disappointment will result from failure of growers to realize the often emphasized point that the size of the incentive payment depends on the price received for the wool. With the second wool marketing year under the new program start- ing April 1, 1956, Oscar J. Westby, Chairman of the Walsh County Ag- ricultural Stabilization and Conser- vation Committee again points out that the more the grower gets when he sells his wool the greater will be his incentive payment--the lowex lower the sale price, the smaller the payment. Here;s the way Chairman Westby explains it. The payment will not be determined until the 1955-clip sales records are in. The payment to the grower will be based upon the percentage needed to bring the National average return to wool growers to 62 cents a pound. The words "National average" are signi- ficant. So is "percentage". If it fig- ures out that a 15-percent payment is needed to bring the National av- erage return to 62 cents per pound, the grower will get a payment bas- ed on 15 percent of what he receiv- ed when he sold his wool. It is recognized that the 1955 crop, with few exceptions, has been sold. Nothing can be done about that. But another season is at hand and the new marketing year will begin April 1. It is for that reason that the chairman emphasizes again "the more you get when you sell your wool, the greater will be your wool payment." Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd Bernston and children. Steven and Brent, spent the week end in Valley City with his mother Mrs. Bernt Bernston. magistrate and one member on the Park board. Expiring this year are terms of ward; and Harold Dougherty, thi-d Alderman David Mebzrg, frs' ward. ' Holdovers on the council are Mayor M. O. Johnson and Aldermen John Bures, Dr. W. E. Cowger and M. S. Bateman. Mrs. J. Danlelski Dies at Mlnto Mrs. John Danielski, 75, died Feb. 29 at her home in Minto. A fire in her home shortly before that time, injured her slightly and is believed to have brought on a fatal heart attack. The daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Mike Steltman, she was born in Perham, Minn., May 10, 1880, and came to the Warsaw area with her parents about 72 years ago. She was married to John Daniel- ski at Warsaw Jan. 17, 1898. Survivors are two daughters, Mrs. Adam Stoltman (Frances), Oslo, and Mrs. Bernard N'arloch (Julia), Min- to; three sons, John at home, Julius of Detroit, and Harry of San Diego, Calif.; 13 grandchildren and six great grandchildren. Her husband died in 1951. 4-H Leaders Meet In P R March 15 A county 4-H leadere training meeting for 4-H agricu!tural readers and associate leaders will be held at Park River next Thursday, March 15. The meeting starts at 1:30 p. m. in the city hall basement. John J. Zaylskie, extension forest- er from the State College Station at Fargo, will be in charge of the meeting, giving demonstrations on safety, engineering and horticulture. The information and material which the leaders will get will be is to be erected over the bath house. In other business the council: * Instructed a committee com- prised of Aldermen Bures, Meberg and Dougherty, to purchase an aerial ladder for the city. The com- mittee was appointed at a previous meeting to investigate prices and i types. ! -k Made a motion to acknow- i ledge the Great Northern Railway's transfer of deed for the old water tower to the city. * Instructed the City Treasurer to insure three units of the city fleet for the remainder of 1958 and the following year. Heard a statement by Mayor M. O. Johnson that he had ordered two carloads of cement with deliv- ery as soon as possible. PSC To Conduct Phone Hearing A public hearing will be held at the court house in Grafton Wednes- day, March .14, by Public Service Commissioner Martin Vaaler on an application of Polar Rural Tele- phone Mutual Aid Corporation of Grafton to take over four phone companies. In its application, the Polar Cor- poration asks permission to pur- chase the Edinburg-Gardar Tele- phone Co., of Edinburg, the St. Thomas Rural Telephone Co,, the Glasston Mutal Telephone Co,, and the South Carlisld Telephone Co., Hamilton. Polar also seeks ission to make a clrge of 25 cents per month for dial service furnished non-members and to establish a minimum monthly guarantee of $7.50 for each semi-public phone. It also wishes to discontinue furnish- ing extended area service between exchanges at Hoople and St. Thom- as. The hearing has been set to re- ceive information and testimony by all parties concerned. It will begin used to train their 4-H club mere- at 9:30 a. m., aCcording to Elmer bers for the balance 0f the current Olson, the commission's secretary. club year. Vaaler will be accompanied to In addition to the leaders and as- sociate leaders, County Extension Agent Robert Amstrup said older members of the 4-H clubs also are invited to attend the training meet- ing. W00lsh Educators On Review Board Walsh County Agricultural School Superintendent F. U. Smith and Grafton High School Supt. James Maxwell have been appointed to serve on a reviewing committee of the North Dakota Central Associa- tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools. Smith and Maxwell will be among a dozen or so North Dakota educators on North Central associa- tion committees which study school reports, seeing that certain stand- ards are maintained if a school is to keep its accreditation by the North Central association. Smith al- so was one of the North Dakotans on the committees last year. The committees are to meet at lhe North Central association's annual sesion April 9-13 at Chicago. In Region 3 Finals Defending Class C Champion Os- nabrock and Hannah will mee in the finals of the Region 3 basketball tournament tonight at 7:30 in Park Grafton by Clarence Bryant, the commission's chief engineer. WHAT'S DOING March 8: Walsh Co. NPL conven- tion, 2 P. M., Park River city hall. March 9, Walsh Co. Republican convention. 2 p. m. Courthouse at Grafton. March 9: St. Ansgar's Hospital Auxiliary meets. March 9: Garden Club meets at Mrs. I. E. Hansen's home 2 P. M. March 12-17: Red Cross fund drive in Park River. March 12: American Legion Aux- iliary meets 8 p. m. at the Legion hall. Party for members of the Am- erican Legion to follow March 12: American Legion Aux- iliary meets 8 p. m. in eLgion hall. Birthday party for the American Legion members same night at 9. March 13: Park River Cemetery association meets. 7 p. m. City hall b.sement March 14: The Federated Guild will meet at the home of Mrs. IV/. S. Bateman. March 15: Walsh County 4-H leaders training meeting. 1:30 p. m., Park River city hall. March 15: Presbyterian Mission- ary will meet in Federated church parlors. River. March 19: Harmony Homemakers Osnabrock downed Fordville 50- at Mrs. Fred Silliman's Postponed 40 and Hannah beat Brocket 46-34 from March 5. in elimination playoffs last night. March 20: Waish Co. and Three The tournament was to have open- ed a day earlier but was postponed because of bad weather. PARK RIVER GRAIN MARKET Flax $3.31; wheat $2.13; durum, t $2.35; oats 47e; barley 65c to $I.O0 Buy U. S. Sevings Bonds Today! Rivers Soil Conservation elecion of supervisors. March 20: Township and village elections. March 28: Easter Seal Drive. March 21: Walsh County Wildlife Federation "Stag Night", Grafton armory. See Us Abolrl: Our New lud00t Life Insurance