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Walsh County Press
Park River , North Dakota
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January 28, 2015     Walsh County Press
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January 28, 2015
 

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. . _ L..&apos;- .... - :.. . ': .-: .2 '" " " .... : " " .......... " : ' Page 6 THE WALSH COUNTY PRESS, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 28, 2015 :: Walsh Corm to p00dpate in ne00USDA ' Rural Conservation Partnership Program FARGO, N.D. -- Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced recently that 115 high-impact projects across all 50 states, in- cluding North Dakota, will re- ceive more than $370 million as part of the new Regional Conser- vation PartnershipProgram. The RCPP is"a new, historic focus on public-private partner- ships enabling private companies, local communities and other non- government partners a way to in- vest in efforts to keep our land resilient and water clean, and pro- mote tremendous economic growth in: :agriculture, construe- tion iouri and outdoor recre- ation, and other industries. "Partners are seeing the value of conservation and investing in their future," Vilsack said. "These partnerships are forging a new path for getting conservation on the ground and are providing op- portunities for communities to have a voice and ownership in protecting and improving our nat- ural resources. The Regional Con- servation Partnership Program ushers in a new era of conserva- tion, and we're excited about the down-the-road benefits from this new Farm Bill program." "RCPP puts 6ur parmers in the driver's seat," said Mary Podoll, USDA'S Natural Resources Con- servation Service state conserva- tionist in North Dakota. "Projects are led locally, and demonstrate the value Ofstrrng public-private partnerships that deliver solutions to tough natural resource chal- lenges." One of the RCPP projects se- lected in North Dakota is "How Far North Can We Grow: 49th Parallel Cover Crop Project." This project is led by the Northern Plains Resource Conservation and Development Council based out of De3z/ls. Lake, ND, serving northeastern ND counties. The "How Far North Can We Grow" Project will demonstrate innovative approaches for the adoption of cover crops to im- prove soil health practices in the relatively cool, wet, and short-sea- son climate in northern North Dakota. New techniques will be evaluated by ag producers in part- nership with Soil Conservation Districts, including the Walsh County SCD, NRCS, and North Dakota State University County Extension staff and NDSU Soil Health Team personnel. "This will be an exciting op- portunity to develop and docu- ment innovative approaches to raising cover crops in northeastern ND," said Northern Plains RC&D Council Chair Paul Overby. A key feature of the project will be en- couraging farmers in the project to try different things and then share the results with each other. Other counties involved in this project are Pembina, Cavalier, Towner, Pierce, Benson, Ramsey, Nelson and Walsh Counties. "The Coun- cil is also involved with efforts to develop a parallel project in Man- itoba, Canada," said Overby Other RCPP projects funded in North Dakota include the Medora Grazing Association North Billings Prairie Grasslands Con- servation Project to provide a proactive approach for ranchers to augment their conservation stew- ardship on the National Grass- lands under US Forest Service management; and, the Red River Basin of the North Flood Preven- tion Plan to reduce flooding, ponding, and excess water on farm lands, thereby increasing the resiliency of agriculture, as well as to reduce nutrient loads in this re- gion of Minnesota and North Dakota. According to USDA, this year's projects will engage hun- dreds of partners across the coun- try with wide-ranging interests, including communities, conserva- tion districts, agribusiness, non- government  organizations, for- and non-profit organizations, state and federal agencies and Tribal governments. In addition to USDA funds, partners' will con- tribute an estimated $400 million, more than doubling USDA's in- vestment. 00san:mritan Sbcicn' POSITIONS AVAILABLE: RN/I_PN Part-time 8-hour shifts. DAY SHIFT CNA FULL-TIME. CNA part-time various shifts. $1 diff&ent[al pay for evening shifts, $1.50 for night shifts. New call-in and weekend employee incentives. Benefit eligible at 30 hours. Benefits: health, dental, life insurance. Vacation and Christmas Accounts, Credit Union. If you enjoy working with people in a Christian envi- ronment, please apply @ www.good-sam.com. All qualified applicants will receive consideration without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability or protected veteran status. jtb Annual Ralph Engelstad Arena /\\; Indoor Walk "-<SK-'Outdo0 r Fun I. I1 Health & Wellness Fir / Kids Zone Activities All proceeds go to the efforts to build the SUNSHINE HOSPITALITY HOME Register today at SunshineMemorial.org For more information on how to get involved or make a donation, please contact us at: info@su nshineme morial.org or www.su nshinememorial.org -.-m,Altru Sponsored by: Minto native on North Dakota Soybean Council: visits NDS00s W'mter Soy )ean Nurseries in Chile FARGO, N.D. -- The North Dakota Soybean Council (NDSC) has been a funding pa.1 t- ner of NDSU's soybean breedl program since 1986 under the d- rection of soybean breeder Dr. Ted Helms. This year NDSC has allocated approximately 7 $345,000 for the NDSU soybean breeding program. To see these research dollars at work, NDSC's Research Com- mittee conducted a fact-finding. mission to NDSU's winter nurs- ery in Santiago, Chile January 3- 10, 2015. The delegation included NDSC board and research com- mittee members Tyler Speich, Milnor; Charles Linderman, Car- rington; Rick Albrecht, Wimble- don; Brent Kohls, Mayville; Joe Ericson, Wimbledon; Scott Gaus- low, Colfax; Art Wosick, Minto; and Mike Appert, Hazelton. Five representatives from the Min- nesota Soybean Research and Promotion Council were invited to participate on the delegation, along with NDSU Soybean Breeder Dr. Ted Helms and Dr. Jim Off, University of Minnesota soybean breeder. Dr. Gary Secor, NDSU potato breeder and pro- fessor; Dr. Gonzalo Rojas-Ci- fuentes, assistant director of NDSU's foundation seedstocks; and Viviana Rivera-Varas, re- search assistant in NDSU's De- partment of Plant Pathology accompanied the delegation as the group's country experts and interpreters. NDSU's soybean breeding program develops conventional and glyphosate-resistance soy-. bean varieties for the general-use and specialty-export markets. Dr. Helms also tests private-company varieties to assist farmers in the selection of the best variety for their farm. He has been using winter nurseries in Chile since 1987. ._ "Having a winter nursery is standard practice for soybean breeders and helps reduce the number of years the breeding process takes from 10 years to 7 years," says Dr. Ted Helms, soy- bean breeder at NDSU. "This al- lows farmers to take advantage of the better, high yielding, im- proved pest resistant soybean va- Photo: Submitted Above: North Dakota Soybean Coundl board members travel to Chile January 3-10, 2015 to see research dollars at work with NDSU's soybean winter nurseries. From left to right: Charles Underman, cacrington; Tyler Speich, Milnor; Scott Gauslow, Colfax; Mike Appert, Hazelton; Rick Albrecht, Wimbledon;'and Art Wosick, Mint0. rieties more quickly." NDSU has two winter nurs- eries in Chile. NDSU's winter nursery used to develop glyphosate-resistance experimen- tal lines is located near Rancagua, Chile. Thanks to NDSU's glyphosate-resistance breeding program, a new and an improved glyphosate resistance variety could be released in 2017, with commercial quantity of seed available for farmers in 2018. "We anticipate that farmers will be able to save their own seed of glyphosate-resistance soybean varieties developed by NDSU," says Dr. Helms. "Plant- ing NDSU developed glyphosate-resistance types will save growers money by reducing seed costs." A second winter nursery is hosted at the Chilean Institute of Agricultural Research (1NIA) at La Platina in Santiago. The fa- cility continues to play a vital role in the research and develop- ment of new genetic varieties of conventional soybeans. "This is the first time NDSC has traveled to Chile to see Dr. Helms' soybean breeding pro- gram, and it gave our board good insight on how Ted's soybean program works," says Tyler Spe- ich, chairman of NDSC's Re- search Committee and farmer from Milnor, N.D. "Checkoff dollars invested-in soybean breeding research at NDSU pro- vides a significant return on in- vestment to North Dakota growers because of the success- ful role of the Chile winter nurs- eries." While in Chile, the delegation also visited Dr. Orf's University of Minnesota soybean breeding facility at La Platina in Santiago and learned about his work with glyphosate-resistance soybeans, food grade and high oleic soy- beans. The North Dakota and Minnesota soybean delegation toured the winter nurseries of DuPont Pioneer and Monsanto, both located about an hour from Santiago. ,, "The public breeding ,pro- grams of North Dakota State Uni- versity and the University of Minnesota under the leadership of Dr. Helms and Dr. Orf, respec- tively, are very important to northern soybean producers," says NDSC Director of Reseai'ch Program Kendall Nichols. The breeding programs Supply grow- ers with disease resistant, high- yielding varieties to North Dakota and Minnesota'soybean growers years earlier by utilizing the winter nurseries in Chile." North Dakota soybean farmers across the state are represented on the NDSC Board, whictf+e- sees a grass.r0ots promofirfi, rd- search and marketing program funded by soybean checkoffdol- lars. The Council's mission is to effectively invest and leverage North Dakota soy checkoffre - sources to maximize thebenefits of North Dakota soy. The Council is organized by Nortt/ Dakota State law. Park River Parks and Rec Annual ice Fishing Derby .... Registration to start 12:30 Kids 12 & under are free! l'a rk? c Recreation First Care Health Center's Feb. Schedule Dr. Baig, Gastroenterologist ............................................. Feb. 11 (Colonoscopy, Endoscopy, Hepatic Consults) Dr. Khokha, Surgeon ............... :. ........................... Every Thursday Dr. Go, Cardiologist ............... . .......................................... Feb. 19 Dr. Ronald Broekman, Ophthalmologist ........................... Feb. 17 Audiocare AM - Brenda Haugen .......................................... Feb. 24 Wakefield Hearing Center 9 AM - 5 PM ............................ Feb. 17 Richard Wakefield, BCH Mammograms, Digital .................................................. Feb. 4, 18 Foot Care Clinic 9AM - 2PM ............................................. Feb. 18 Nuclear Medicine ............................................................... Feb. 5 Christina Bata, Dietitian .......... . ................................. Every Thursday Mental Health Therapists-- Caitlin Massop, M.A .............................................. Tuesdays & Thursdays Aleska Hagan, MS .............................................................. Wednesdays Eliah Reding, B.A .................................................................. Every Friday C T Scans available daily MRIs--every Thursday Ultrasounds--every Monday and Thursday DEXA Scans- Bone Density Measurement--Wed. & Friday (Must have a health provider orders) Call 284-7555 for an appointment i First Care Health Center Park River, ND www.firstcarehc.com .__,o.,,,o,,,,,,,,,,,<o=t,,,o,,I 284-6333 or wcpross@polarcomm.com  , i North Platte Hiring Fair February 5:7: Mid Plains Community College, BU,mNC AMEmCX 1101 Halligan Drive North Platte, NE 69101 Immediate Openings for Electricians, Mechanics and Train Crew On the spot interviews and offers Railroad benefits including low-cost health care and retirement Stable work environment .. Tools and equipment provided Interested candidates should apply at www.UP.jobs priorto the event. For more information Or job applications, contact rrmarsha@up'.:om o(www.UP.jobs What will ,ou build? www.UP.iobs of North Dakota adults read their NEWSPAPER every wiek! 73"{ of 18 to 24-year-o!ds .74% of 25 to 34:year olds .73% , 35 to 44-year-olds ,89% of 45 to 54-year olds .91 }b of those 55+ F